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-   -   Any way to warm up a bike faster when you bring it inside? (https://www.bikeforums.net/winter-cycling/1192398-any-way-warm-up-bike-faster-when-you-bring-inside.html)

bikerbobbbb 01-21-20 05:09 PM

Any way to warm up a bike faster when you bring it inside?
 
My bike's out in the cold, long enough to adjust/match that outside temperature.

If I bring my bike inside, is there any way to warm the bike up faster than just letting it sit? I'm trying to think of ideas. Maybe a space heater, but that might start causing more wear compared to just letting it warm up on its own. And I don't have a space heater....

It's an aluminum bike too. I've been experimenting with bringing (ie sneaking) it inside for about an hour before I need it. That seems to work fairly well. Outside cold, inside for an hour or so, and it's much nicer than the outside temps for sure.

Just fishing for ideas....

wolfchild 01-21-20 05:33 PM

Why warm up a bike ??.What's the point ??

jon c. 01-21-20 05:58 PM

Bikes are people too?

caloso 01-21-20 06:47 PM

This is a joke, right?

bikerbobbbb 01-21-20 07:32 PM

It's not a joke. The bike is outside so it's literally ice cold. You sit on a cold bike seat and then grip cold handlebars. There's definitely a difference riding a bike that's sitting outside vs. one that's kept inside -- Cold butt and fingers go numb faster gripping the cold handlebars. Add in having to squeeze the handlebars more if I wear thicker gloves when it's colder out or when it's icier out and I grip the handlebars more. So if I bring the bike inside before I ride it when I'm stuck having to leave it outside, that helps. I'm wondering if I can get it to room temperature faster though.

A fan blowing air over it. Maybe an electric blanket. Laying something on it that's warmed. Putting it by something like an old boiler or oven.

But if it goes from an outside temp and then heats up faster than just sitting there at room temperature, I wonder what might do, in terms of the faster temperature change and also if that's repeated for wearing things. I would think even without speeding up the temperature change process that it's going to wear things out a little faster than if I kept the bike inside all the time and only had it outside while riding it.

DrIsotope 01-21-20 07:37 PM

Unless you're somehow crammed into an almost impossibly small space, I dunno... keep the bike inside? Our house is not large by any measure, but I could easily clear a space to store a bike if the need were to arise.

u235 01-21-20 08:21 PM

Aluminum bike right? Do you have an electric dryer? Disconnect your electric dryer power cord and cut one of the wires. Attach one end of the cut wire to the chainstay and the other end to the right handlebar as close to the end as possible. Turn the dryer on but stay away from the bike. The dryer won't run because it's not plugged in but it has to be on. In about an hour the bike will be just about the same temperature as the air in the house. The earlier in the week you do this the better. Towards the end of the week it does not work as good. When you are done reconnect the wires and plug the dryer back in. You can limit wear on the bike by hooking the wires up the other way the next time to even things out.

bobwysiwyg 01-21-20 08:29 PM


Originally Posted by bikerbobbbb (Post 21294453)
It's not a joke. The bike is outside so it's literally ice cold. You sit on a cold bike seat and then grip cold handlebars. There's definitely a difference riding a bike that's sitting outside vs. one that's kept inside -- Cold butt and fingers go numb faster gripping the cold handlebars. Add in having to squeeze the handlebars more if I wear thicker gloves when it's colder out or when it's icier out and I grip the handlebars more. So if I bring the bike inside before I ride it when I'm stuck having to leave it outside, that helps. I'm wondering if I can get it to room temperature faster though.

A fan blowing air over it. Maybe an electric blanket. Laying something on it that's warmed. Putting it by something like an old boiler or oven.

But if it goes from an outside temp and then heats up faster than just sitting there at room temperature, I wonder what might do, in terms of the faster temperature change and also if that's repeated for wearing things. I would think even without speeding up the temperature change process that it's going to wear things out a little faster than if I kept the bike inside all the time and only had it outside while riding it.

Sounds like a bit of impatience, and this is from someone who lacks patience. Ask my wife. :rolleyes:

2manybikes 01-21-20 09:20 PM

If it's cold outside and the bike is cold you bring into say 68 degrees, something like a bike will get condensation on it. The bigger the temperature difference the more condensation there is. The faster you warm it up the worse it is. If you need to go outside when there is still condensation on something it will turn to ice if it's cold enough.
If you get condensation in the frame you can't see it. if you get some in the cables it can freeze the cable solid if there was not enough time to dry the bike out.
If you bring the bike inside let it warm up slowly, and let it dry all night long. I've seen frozen cables from this a couple of times. I was deer hunting when it was about 20f, brought the shotgun inside, leaned it against the wall and the water was pouring off the weapon.
Or leave the bike in the cold. maybe a garage, or a shed, and wear the right clothing. I do it all the time.

308jerry 01-21-20 10:02 PM


Originally Posted by u235 (Post 21294504)
Aluminum bike right? Do you have an electric dryer? Disconnect your electric dryer power cord and cut one of the wires. Attach one end of the cut wire to the chainstay and the other end to the right handlebar as close to the end as possible. Turn the dryer on but stay away from the bike. The dryer won't run because it's not plugged in but it has to be on. In about an hour the bike will be just about the same temperature as the air in the house. The earlier in the week you do this the better. Towards the end of the week it does not work as good. When you are done reconnect the wires and plug the dryer back in. You can limit wear on the bike by hooking the wires up the other way the next time to even things out.


​​​​​​ Oh my...... :popcorn

2manybikes 01-21-20 10:07 PM


Originally Posted by 308jerry (Post 21294579)
​​​​​​ Oh my...... :popcorn

I think it would be safer to build a bonfire in the living room and throw it in the fire. Just use a stick to get it out of the fire.
Bonus `~ you can make smores while cooking the bike.

Senrab62 01-21-20 10:12 PM


Originally Posted by DrIsotope (Post 21294457)
Unless you're somehow crammed into an almost impossibly small space, I dunno... keep the bike inside? Our house is not large by any measure, but I could easily clear a space to store a bike if the need were to arise.

This plus look for a hook or system to store it vertically to reduce footprint of bike..

sweeks 01-21-20 10:18 PM


Originally Posted by 2manybikes (Post 21294549)
Or leave the bike in the cold. maybe a garage, or a shed, and wear the right clothing. I do it all the time.

This ^^. With proper clothing and the heat you'll be generating within minutes, you won't notice the cold.
I commute by bike. My commuter sits in the garage where, lately, it's been in the teens. I can't imagine wasting the time to bring the bike in every night.

WGB 01-21-20 10:44 PM

Have a quick release for the seat. Bring it inside and keep warm. Reattach in the morning.

HerrKaLeun 01-21-20 11:10 PM

Bicycles are people too. Like corporations....

If you have high ceilings, attach the bike up there since warm air rises.

Or give it a hot tub in the hot tub.

Stand it over the furnace vents. If you don't have a furnace, connect the hydronic heating supply to the head tube, and BOTH chainstays to the hydronic return line. If you only connect one chainstay, you get uneven heating of the frame and it will bend. That is how 126mm rearspacing happens.

Start a pottery hobby and put the kiln where the bike sleeps. have a batch of pottery ready to be burned before the bike comes home.

pdlamb 01-22-20 10:19 AM

Getting the literally ice-cold bike inside is going to make your hands painfully cold. You might consider wearing the gloves you put on to bring the bike inside while you're actually riding the bike.

Similar process holds for the saddle, butt I'll leave that to your imagination.

ironwood 01-23-20 02:58 PM


Originally Posted by u235 (Post 21294504)
Aluminum bike right? Do you have an electric dryer? Disconnect your electric dryer power cord and cut one of the wires. Attach one end of the cut wire to the chainstay and the other end to the right handlebar as close to the end as possible. Turn the dryer on but stay away from the bike. The dryer won't run because it's not plugged in but it has to be on. In about an hour the bike will be just about the same temperature as the air in the house. The earlier in the week you do this the better. Towards the end of the week it does not work as good. When you are done reconnect the wires and plug the dryer back in. You can limit wear on the bike by hooking the wires up the other way the next time to even things out.

I'm surprised that you didn't suggest a small nuclear reactor.

Buglady 01-24-20 03:44 PM


Originally Posted by ironwood (Post 21297060)
I'm surprised that you didn't suggest a small nuclear reactor.

No, that's for the e-bike motor :p

wolfchild 01-24-20 05:06 PM

Somebody need to invent heated handlebars and heated saddles.:rolleyes:

BobbyG 01-25-20 08:05 AM

bikerbobbbb I commute year round down to 5F. My three bikes sit outside in an unheated shed. Below 15F the bikes sometimes feel kinda stiff for a couple of minutes, and using the pump to top off the AirZound air-horn can be a little tough. Also, the cable locks can be stiff. But I've never felt like the seat or bars are cold. On the other hand, I've been wrapping my bars in 3/4" pipe insulation for a dozen years due to hand issues. And each bike has a padded gel-seat cover...well, my snow bike has an actual padded gel seat (with springs). That may have something to do with it.

noglider 01-25-20 10:23 AM


Originally Posted by WGB (Post 21294615)
Have a quick release for the seat. Bring it inside and keep warm. Reattach in the morning.

This reminds me of the story my friend told me. On his winter break, he would stay with his grandparents in rural New Hampshire. They had an outhouse rather than an indoor toilet. The seats were kept above the fireplace inside. He would take one of the seats (I don't know why there were two) off the wall and carry it out to the outhouse. He said it was actually a fond memory.

Pouhana 03-07-20 08:49 PM


Originally Posted by bikerbobbbb (Post 21294453)
It's not a joke. The bike is outside so it's literally ice cold. You sit on a cold bike seat and then grip cold handlebars. There's definitely a difference riding a bike that's sitting outside vs. one that's kept inside -- Cold butt and fingers go numb faster gripping the cold handlebars. Add in having to squeeze the handlebars more if I wear thicker gloves when it's colder out or when it's icier out and I grip the handlebars more. So if I bring the bike inside before I ride it when I'm stuck having to leave it outside, that helps. I'm wondering if I can get it to room temperature faster though.

A fan blowing air over it. Maybe an electric blanket. Laying something on it that's warmed. Putting it by something like an old boiler or oven.

But if it goes from an outside temp and then heats up faster than just sitting there at room temperature, I wonder what might do, in terms of the faster temperature change and also if that's repeated for wearing things. I would think even without speeding up the temperature change process that it's going to wear things out a little faster than if I kept the bike inside all the time and only had it outside while riding it.

I have same problem except for no cold saddle complaints.

I bought a Eddie Bauer hand warmer power bank device. I turn it on and put it in a pocket.I grab it in my pocket and it quickly warms the palm of my gloved hands.
I have a very short cord to re-charge my Garmin which only lasts 8 hours and I have a headlight that plugs into the power bank.

For the seat I suggest a reusable warmer/ice pack Just warm it in microwave and hold it onto the seat for a minute. In the summer freeze it and leave with it in the pocket of your Camelback

Daniel4 03-08-20 10:12 AM

I thought the World Naked Bike Ride took place in the summer.

If your bike seat and handlebars are ice cold, put on a pair of long johns and wear gloves.

cyccommute 03-11-20 06:14 PM


Originally Posted by 2manybikes (Post 21294549)
If it's cold outside and the bike is cold you bring into say 68 degrees, something like a bike will get condensation on it. The bigger the temperature difference the more condensation there is. The faster you warm it up the worse it is. If you need to go outside when there is still condensation on something it will turn to ice if it's cold enough.

While I agree that bring a bike into the house to warm it up is a little silly, condensation isn’t a problem. The outside of the bike is painted so any water that condenses there isn’t going to do anything...not that much water is going to condense on it to begin with. Water inside the tubes might be a problem but there simply isn’t much water inside the air in the tubes and there isn’t much air for the water to be in the first place. I haven’t done the calculations but I would estimate 500mL to a liter (about a quart) of air volume in a bicycle. I suspect that would be very high for a steel bike which has much smaller tubes. At 32F, there is about 4 g (about a teaspoon) of water in a kilogram of air. The rub is that it takes 770 liters of air to equal on kg of air. In other words from about 700 times to 1400 times what you have in the tubes. In other words, you have to have a wind blowing through those tubes to get that much air through it.

Not that condensation would be much of an issue for the aluminum. It’s fairly inert to water corrosion.


Originally Posted by bikerbobbbb (Post 21294453)
It's not a joke. The bike is outside so it's literally ice cold. You sit on a cold bike seat and then grip cold handlebars. There's definitely a difference riding a bike that's sitting outside vs. one that's kept inside -- Cold butt and fingers go numb faster gripping the cold handlebars. Add in having to squeeze the handlebars more if I wear thicker gloves when it's colder out or when it's icier out and I grip the handlebars more. So if I bring the bike inside before I ride it when I'm stuck having to leave it outside, that helps. I'm wondering if I can get it to room temperature faster though.

A fan blowing air over it. Maybe an electric blanket. Laying something on it that's warmed. Putting it by something like an old boiler or oven.

My bike is kept in my garage when I ride to work and is kept inside at work. I don’t really notice much difference when riding. It’s usually warmer in the evening, of course. That said, the type of handlebar tape or grips could make a difference. Thicker tape or foam rubber grips are warmer than thinner tape or plain rubber grips. They keep the heat from your hands being sucked into the metal of the bars quite so quickly. Carbon bars can also help. Carbon is an insulator and doesn’t transmit heat as much.

nomadmax 03-12-20 05:12 AM

Just wear clothing appropriate for the weather conditions you're going to ride in. I used to ride in all weather conditions, including sub-zero ambient temps and my bike stayed outside in between calls. I can't say that I ever noticed a difference between stored inside and sitting out in the weather. Now a wet seat, that's a big difference but it's easily solved with a grocery bag or hotel shower cap.


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