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Goggles fine, but now glasses fog... ​​​​​​​

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Goggles fine, but now glasses fog... ​​​​​​​

Old 01-22-20, 08:27 PM
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AstroEng
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Goggles fine, but now glasses fog... ​​​​​​​

I've been reading a lot of threads here looking for anti-fogging solutions. I'm ordering Catcrap to try that, but I'm looking for other solutions.

I just finally broke down and got OTG Ski Goggles to replace my visorgogs. The Ski Goggles themselves work great - not a trace of fog. However, after about the 2 mi point, when I start to warm up, my glasses fog like crazy. I even tried removing my balaclava to make sure that wasn't the problem. I guess it is from the heat and humidity from my face.

Suggestions? Most of what I have found is defog one or the other, not glasses under goggles. Thanks in advance.

FWIW, the visorgogs work ok. My balaclava let's too much air go upward and the fog up. However, because they are relatively open, I can turn my head a little to induce a cross breeze. This is also part of my issue with them: I don't ride below 0F because they let in too much air and I'm worried about frostbite on the exposed skin. Hence I bought the goggles...
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Old 01-23-20, 06:49 AM
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Goggles fine, but now glasses fog...
Originally Posted by AstroEng View Post
I've been reading a lot of threads here looking for anti-fogging solutions. I'm ordering Catcrap to try that, but I'm looking for other solutions.

I just finally broke down and got OTG Ski Goggles to replace my visorgogs. The Ski Goggles themselves work great - not a trace of fog. However, after about the 2 mi point, when I start to warm up, my glasses fog like crazy.

I even tried removing my balaclava to make sure that wasn't the problem. I guess it is from the heat and humidity from my face.

Suggestions? Most of what I have found is defog one or the other, not glasses under goggles. Thanks in advance.

FWIW, the visorgogs work ok. My balaclava let's too much air go upward and the fog up. However, because they are relatively open, I can turn my head a little to induce a cross breeze. This is also part of my issue with them:

I don't ride below 0F because they let in too much air and I'm worried about frostbite on the exposed skin. Hence I bought the goggles...
​​​​​​​FWIW, see my perennial post with further discussion:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I perennially post about my winter eyewear for my 14 mile year-round commute, from about 35 down to as low as 0. I must wear my prescription eyeglasses, and fogging is one of the worst dangers of winter riding. I am entirely satisfied with my system:

I realize now that my goggles and face mask are actually an integrated system of heating and ventilation that keeps my face warm and my vision unencumbered by fogging...
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
IME, and from reading numerous posts on the subject, there are three basic methods for preventing fogging, caused by exhaled moist air onto the cold surface of the eyeglasses and goggles:...

3. Antifogging agents, like Cat Crap, soap, spit etc.: I find that when exhaling forcefully, and colder temperatures, say under 20 F, those agents can be overcome. Thats why I suggest
that any recommendations for winter riding include description of the conditions in which they are employed, i.e. lowest temperature and distance

Im not trying to be contrarian about any methods used, but I am zealous because fogging is a difficult and dangerous challenge to winter riding, and would keep me off the bike for about 3 to 4 months during the year. Every year there are many threads on about the problem.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 01-23-20 at 07:19 AM.
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Old 01-23-20, 07:24 AM
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After all, the choice is huge ... Here, for example, G2447 only has a black frame ... one minus of these glasses is the impossibility of replacing lenses, because you won’t ride in dark nights ((
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Old 01-23-20, 08:56 AM
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I still have the Scott anti-fog downhill skiing goggles, and they still work great. I bought these at my local ski & bike store

This spring, I will be trying @jim_From_Boston's idea of using hardware glasses as a wind protector. This sounds like a great suggestion!
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Old 01-23-20, 10:20 AM
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˄˄˄˄
Originally Posted by parkbrav View Post
This spring, I will be trying @jim_From_Boston's idea of using hardware glasses as a wind protector. This sounds like a great suggestion!
Thanks for the nod, @parkbrav, Speaking of good ideas, I have also recently posted:
Originally Posted by scoatw View Post
Sorry to respond so late. I just now saw it on my notifications. Just as I described. First put balaclava on covering your mouth. Second, fit headband around your head so it covers your nose and cheeks. The balaclava covers your mouth, thus warming your face.

The break between the balaclava and the headband provides an escape route for your warm exhales instead of going up into your goggles. Got it?
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I like that idea, and look foward to trying it out.

BTW, @scoatw, FYA, I have previously posted
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
... I have extracted this [winter cycling] slogan from a post by @scoatw of Ohio, "Gear and gumption." Always on bad weather days someone at work will ask me, "You didn't ride your bicycle today, did you?."

When its really bad out, my wife will chide me, You just want to ride your bike today, so you can write about it to Bike Forums."

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 01-23-20 at 11:30 AM.
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Old 01-23-20, 01:18 PM
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think you need better ventilation
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Old 01-23-20, 07:22 PM
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I've tried the hardware store safety glasses as well. The visorgogs I found to stay fog free far better and are, IMO, easier to wear (elastic strap). I have my mirror connected to my helmet and like the positioning, so I'm not concerned about a stiff side piece on the glasses.

Again, my concern is that below about 0F, the exposed skin left by open solutions like hardware store glasses and visorgogs get very cold and eventually painful, especially if there is wind coming from the sides (which seems to be the norm for me when it gets that cold).

I'll try to fidget with the goggle vents - maybe my helmet or something is blocking them. It doesn't help that I can't pull off the goggles while riding and clear fog as they tend to take my glasses with them.

It may be a while before I can try again. It looks to be relatively warm the next week or so.
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Old 01-24-20, 08:46 AM
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Let me just back up to re-iterate something

Winter: Scott anti-fogg ski goggles
https://www.amazon.com/SCOTT-Yellow-...VRNG3W8PYW4RYD


Spring: hardware glasses
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Old 01-24-20, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by AstroEng View Post
I've tried the hardware store safety glasses as well. The visorgogs I found to stay fog free far better and are, IMO, easier to wear (elastic strap). I have my mirror connected to my helmet and like the positioning, so I'm not concerned about a stiff side piece on the glasses.

Again, my concern is that below about 0F, the exposed skin left by open solutions like hardware store glasses and visorgogs get very cold and eventually painful, especially if there is wind coming from the sides (which seems to be the norm for me when it gets that cold).

I'll try to fidget with the goggle vents - maybe my helmet or something is blocking them. It doesn't help that I can't pull off the goggles while riding and clear fog as they tend to take my glasses with them.

It may be a while before I can try again. It looks to be relatively warm the next week or so.
Thanks for your consideration of my previous post. Again may I offer this suggestion:
Originally Posted by scoatw View Post
Sorry to respond so late. I just now saw it on my notifications. Just as I described. First put balaclava on covering your mouth. Second, fit headband around your head so it covers your nose and cheeks. The balaclava covers your mouth, thus warming your face.

The break between the balaclava and the headband provides an escape route for your warm exhales instead of going up into your goggles. Got it?
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I like that idea, and look foward to trying it out...
That would seem to offer much additional facial skin protection, as well as ventilation of exhaled moist air. I myself have not tried it because its been such a mild winter.


I have seen suggestions to apply Vaseline to exposed skin, but Ive never felt the need and sounds too messy for me.
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Old 01-24-20, 06:13 PM
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Had a little fogging problem with my prescription glasses underneath the goggles then used Z-Wax and fogging gone.
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