Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Winter Cycling
Reload this Page >

Ice On the Street - how do you deal with it?

Notices
Winter Cycling Don't let snow and ice discourage you this winter. The key element to year-round cycling is proper attire! Check out this winter cycling forum to chat with other ice bike fanatics.

Ice On the Street - how do you deal with it?

Old 11-29-20, 03:42 PM
  #26  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 39,964

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 486 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6898 Post(s)
Liked 1,537 Times in 970 Posts
Originally Posted by parkbrav View Post
Hey what up Tom, hope you had a great Thanksgiving! Back for another winter season?
I spent last winter in NYC where I normally live. It was the first year ever recorded when there wasn't even as much as a dusting of snow. We had a few cold days but no brutal days. I was able to commute by bike every single day. That was nice.

Then the pandemic hit, and my spouse and I moved to our weekend home in the Hudson Valley. I don't have anywhere to commute to on bike, as I'm taking classes online. My cycling is all different now. I have to tell myself to get on the bike in order to get a ride in. In other words, my need to get places doesn't put the miles on. So in one way it's hard. I don't get enough miles in. In other ways, it's much better. The roads here are amazing. Traffic is light, scenery is fantastic, and even the drivers are nice to cyclist. We have no shoulders on the roads, so I ride in the middle of the lane. Drivers wait until it is safe to pass. But just about all the roads are very hilly.

I hope to ride as much as possible this winter. It's not my favorite season for riding but riding in the cold is better than not riding. How is your pandemic?
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 11-29-20, 08:51 PM
  #27  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 24,053

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 122 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4142 Post(s)
Liked 1,652 Times in 1,007 Posts
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Ooh, a Varsity is a great idea for a winter bike, @Gresp15C.
These are not as cheap but they will last longer than a Varsity and are far more pleasant to ride.



__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 12-01-20, 06:20 AM
  #28  
parkbrav
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 366
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 168 Post(s)
Liked 52 Times in 46 Posts
I've had work from home since March 17 or so. That was a hard-fought victory but we got it. So now I cycle only 1 day out of 7 to the grocery store.
parkbrav is offline  
Old 12-01-20, 02:07 PM
  #29  
Hypno Toad
meh
 
Hypno Toad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Hopkins, MN
Posts: 4,291

Bikes: 21 Bianchi Infinito; 17 Breezer Radar Pro; 15 Surly Pugsley; 13 Felt Z85; 11 Globe Daily; 09 Kona Dew Drop; 96 Mondonico

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 911 Post(s)
Liked 520 Times in 291 Posts
Originally Posted by Helldorado View Post
Last winter I was on my usual morning commute to work. It wast 6 AM and still dark. The temperature was about 33 American Degrees. I came onto a roundabout at the top of a hill and hit a patch of ice - and down I went. My instincts, as I felt myself falling, were to protect the bike with my body. That's what I did but I banged up my left side pretty badly. Nothing broken or irreparably damaged, though. So... How do you guys deal with treacherous ice patches in the winter gloom? It makes me not want to ride when the temp approaches the freezing point of water. Stupid ice!
The way I deal with it ... first, I go out in the early winter with summer tires saying I can handle it (reference video below); then later that day, I mount studded tires and get my winter bike ready to ride; finally, ice bruises and take some advil with whiskey. Then spend the next 12 months forgetting this lesson so I can repeat it the following winter.


Honestly, I have a dedicated winter bike that I get ready for ice/snow before temps get to freezing.

Edit/afterthought: for 'fun' we do stuff like this in Minnesota :


Last edited by Hypno Toad; 12-01-20 at 02:10 PM.
Hypno Toad is offline  
Likes For Hypno Toad:
Old 12-01-20, 02:54 PM
  #30  
Helldorado
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Tacoma, WA, USA
Posts: 161

Bikes: Cervelo Aspero Apex1x 2020; Giant Escape Disc modified commuter 2021

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 126 Post(s)
Liked 80 Times in 44 Posts
Originally Posted by Hypno Toad View Post
The way I deal with it ... first, I go out in the early winter with summer tires saying I can handle it (reference video below); then later that day, I mount studded tires and get my winter bike ready to ride; finally, ice bruises and take some advil with whiskey. Then spend the next 12 months forgetting this lesson so I can repeat it the following winter.


Honestly, I have a dedicated winter bike that I get ready for ice/snow before temps get to freezing.

Edit/afterthought: for 'fun' we do stuff like this in Minnesota :

I thought that's why they built the Mall Of The Americas - so you people wouldn't have to do stuff like that.
Helldorado is offline  
Likes For Helldorado:
Old 12-01-20, 03:11 PM
  #31  
Hypno Toad
meh
 
Hypno Toad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Hopkins, MN
Posts: 4,291

Bikes: 21 Bianchi Infinito; 17 Breezer Radar Pro; 15 Surly Pugsley; 13 Felt Z85; 11 Globe Daily; 09 Kona Dew Drop; 96 Mondonico

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 911 Post(s)
Liked 520 Times in 291 Posts
Originally Posted by Helldorado View Post
I thought that's why they built the Mall Of The Americas - so you people wouldn't have to do stuff like that.
I tried MOA, but they won't like me bike there anymore
Hypno Toad is offline  
Old 12-01-20, 10:47 PM
  #32  
Gresp15C
Senior Member
 
Gresp15C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 3,750
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1010 Post(s)
Liked 573 Times in 372 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
These are not as cheap but they will last longer than a Varsity and are far more pleasant to ride.
I'd take either of those, or both. But I just can't bring myself to drench such nice bikes in sandy road salt every day. And I mean drench. They lay it down thick here.

Now, so far as whether anything will last longer than a 1972 Varsity, I won't be alive to find out.

My other winter bike is a 26" MTB with Kenda studs that someone was throwing out. But my son is using it now.

Just out of curiosity, how do the shocks handle salt? It looks like there are rubber boots around the stanchions. Is that the case?
Gresp15C is offline  
Old 12-02-20, 09:43 AM
  #33  
Hypno Toad
meh
 
Hypno Toad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Hopkins, MN
Posts: 4,291

Bikes: 21 Bianchi Infinito; 17 Breezer Radar Pro; 15 Surly Pugsley; 13 Felt Z85; 11 Globe Daily; 09 Kona Dew Drop; 96 Mondonico

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 911 Post(s)
Liked 520 Times in 291 Posts
Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
Just out of curiosity, how do the shocks handle salt? It looks like there are rubber boots around the stanchions. Is that the case?
The thread is about ice and handling it - so I'll start by saying that I've used both Continental Top Contact Winter (non-studded) and Nokian Mount and Ground (studded) - Never took a fall on either set if tires. Conti are fast rolling and better on a wider range of conditions, but require more caution on bare ice; the Nokian were totally sure footed, but slow rolling. My last set up before retiring this bike was Nokian on front wheel and Conti on rear - best of both works with studs for control for braking & steering up front and fast rolling where most of the weight goes in the rear.

About shocks in winter: Long story (with pics) of my old 26er winter commuter and shocks.

First pic is the Nail Trail with stock fork, it froze up on me after 3 full winters of Minnesota road salt.

Second pic is with a Surly Troll fork ... I really loved the look and set up for winter commuting.

Third pic is the massive crack in the BB that retired this bike back in 2015 (AL frame).





Hypno Toad is offline  
Old 12-02-20, 12:58 PM
  #34  
DangerousDanR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Fargo ND
Posts: 281

Bikes: Lynskey R350, Ritchey Breakaway, Ritchey Double Switchback, Lynskey Ridgeline, ICAN Fatbike

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 119 Post(s)
Liked 122 Times in 67 Posts
Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
Just out of curiosity, how do the shocks handle salt? It looks like there are rubber boots around the stanchions. Is that the case?
I had a Marzocchi fork with an air spring on my winter commuter. One sunny North Dakota January morning where the temperature was around -30F, I went to the garage to find that I had a zero spring fork.

Drat...

I pumped it up and engaged the lockout, then rode to work. The air spring fork never again would work. It is my understanding that the Bluto fat bike forks fail a lot in sub-zero conditions, but that may be exaggerated.

I replaced the fork with an Ohlins coil spring fork, which was a huge improvement on trail rides in the summer, and has not had any issues with sub-zero temperatures.
DangerousDanR is offline  
Old 12-03-20, 09:50 AM
  #35  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 24,053

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 122 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4142 Post(s)
Liked 1,652 Times in 1,007 Posts
Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
I'd take either of those, or both. But I just can't bring myself to drench such nice bikes in sandy road salt every day. And I mean drench. They lay it down thick here.

Now, so far as whether anything will last longer than a 1972 Varsity, I won't be alive to find out.

My other winter bike is a 26" MTB with Kenda studs that someone was throwing out. But my son is using it now.

Just out of curiosity, how do the shocks handle salt? It looks like there are rubber boots around the stanchions. Is that the case?
Both of those bikes are titanium. I could ride them in the Dead Sea and they wouldn’t corrode. That’s part of the reason I have them. The YBB gets studs in the winter.

The shocks have been used for roughly 2 decades of winter riding and haven’t shown any signs of problem. They are higher quality shocks with coated stanchions but I’ve covered them with Lizard Skin covers to cut down on any issues with salt that could arise as well as keep them from getting dust covered.

I also started using KMC Ecotech chains several years ago to keep the chains from rusting.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 12-03-20, 02:21 PM
  #36  
Gresp15C
Senior Member
 
Gresp15C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 3,750
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1010 Post(s)
Liked 573 Times in 372 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Both of those bikes are titanium. I could ride them in the Dead Sea and they wouldn’t corrode. That’s part of the reason I have them. The YBB gets studs in the winter.

The shocks have been used for roughly 2 decades of winter riding and haven’t shown any signs of problem. They are higher quality shocks with coated stanchions but I’ve covered them with Lizard Skin covers to cut down on any issues with salt that could arise as well as keep them from getting dust covered.

I also started using KMC Ecotech chains several years ago to keep the chains from rusting.
Ah, nice. I had never seen boots on shocks before, not that I really looked all that closely. We've got four winter bikes in the family fleet, Two of them needed new chains this year, so I ordered KMC "rust buster" which is a galvanized chain available for 7 speed. Just in time for "all dressed up but nowhere to go" because salt season hasn't started yet and we don't know who's going to need a bike this winter with the lockdown and all.

I've been intrigued by front shock for winter riding. Did I interpret the other thread correctly, that you put a shock fork on a non-shock frame with no adverse issues?
Gresp15C is offline  
Old 12-03-20, 06:13 PM
  #37  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 24,053

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 122 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4142 Post(s)
Liked 1,652 Times in 1,007 Posts
Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
Ah, nice. I had never seen boots on shocks before, not that I really looked all that closely. We've got four winter bikes in the family fleet, Two of them needed new chains this year, so I ordered KMC "rust buster" which is a galvanized chain available for 7 speed. Just in time for "all dressed up but nowhere to go" because salt season hasn't started yet and we don't know who's going to need a bike this winter with the lockdown and all.
KMC has the Eco ProTeq for 8 speed which would also work for 7 speed. The finish is a bit more durable.

The boots are Lizard Skin fork protectors

I've been intrigued by front shock for winter riding. Did I interpret the other thread correctly, that you put a shock fork on a non-shock frame with no adverse issues?
Both of these bikes are built for shocks. Maybe not a 100 mm but the extra 20mm of travel has little effect. Both forks are air and I’ve never had any problem with them losing air in cold weather. I don’t see -30°F but they have worked down to about 0°F. For really cold temperatures, a spring fork would work very well without any worries about pressure. Some coil forks even come with lockouts for those times when you don’t need the suspension.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 12-09-20, 01:07 PM
  #38  
Notso_fastLane
Senior Member
 
Notso_fastLane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Layton, UT
Posts: 1,596

Bikes: 2011 Bent TW Elegance 2014 Carbon Strada Velomobile

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 622 Post(s)
Liked 684 Times in 411 Posts
Best way to deal with ice: Play hockey in a rotovelo!
Notso_fastLane is offline  
Likes For Notso_fastLane:
Old 12-11-20, 09:24 PM
  #39  
Alan Bikes
Banned
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Denver
Posts: 21

Bikes: cruiser, bmx,road

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Snow and slush are the main enemies. They'll bog you down. Some friends of mine love their studded tires. My opinion: nice to have but not critical.

Also, use rubber pad brakes. They never failed on me. I never had the opportunity to pick up serious speed. Stopping was never a concern; keeping up speed was the challenge. You also should have proper winter gear. Go through the checklist here:-
https://bikesreviewed.com/gear/winter-cycling-gear/
Alan Bikes is offline  
Old 12-13-20, 09:35 AM
  #40  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,572
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2090 Post(s)
Liked 498 Times in 423 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
When riding on ice you should do as Loudin Wainwright III said in The Acid Song: “don’t laugh and don’t fart and don’t sneeze”. Don’t try to turn corners. Don’t try to brake. Don’t try to shift your weight. You should act like you are on eggshells. If you have to turn, do very, very, very wide turns without leaning the bike.

If you have to brake, do so gingerly and sparingly. Use the rear more then the front. If you use the front, just realize that it takes very little brake pressure to lock the front. You won’t go over the bars but the front wheel will immediately wash out and put you on the ground. The rear is going to slide as well but it won’t put you on the ground as quickly as the front well.

Shifting your weight is more involved with pedaling than anything else. If possible, coast over the ice if it is just a short patch. Put your feet parallel to the ground and glide over the ice. Don’t coast like most people do with one foot down and one up. You are more stable if your feet as parallel to the ground. If you have to pedal, do so as smoothly as you can. Try not to rock the bike in any way.

If you do fall, keep your hands (and arms and legs) inside the vehicle at all times. Our monkey minds work really well at walking speed and we can probably “catch” ourselves when we fall at walking speed. At running speed, trying to catch yourself in a fall is probably going to result in skeletal injury. At about 4 times walking speed, putting anything out to “catch” yourself is just going to result in gravity trying to break it off for you. Ride the bike down. Keep attached to it. Hang onto the bars and let your larger muscle mass...your hip and butt...take the impact. There’s more meat there and meat does better at impacts then bone does.

Studs will make a huge difference but like many others, I don’t run them the whole winter. Roads here aren’t icy for more than a few days after a snowstorm and studs are horrible to ride on pavement. Being able to ride over short icy patches is a skill that is good to develop.
hey there cycco, I never come on here but fun to see you here.
Good recap and taking the time to try to explain the basic stuff. Its funny but bike handling skills really can only come from doing it and learning from your mistakes, for most of us goofing around on bikes since we were kids helps a lot, and for those of us who have done two wheeled riding on dirt and or anything that involves sliding , we've picked up the instincts over time and don't think about what we are doing for a given situation (and that includes falling and split second decisions of how to place our body in a fall--TOUCH WOOD, TOUCH WOOD.

those are neat front shock covers. My old Rockhopper that I use as my winter bike has late 90s non air non oil suspension, those foam things, and are great for any temperature. They just have those accordian covers, but I clean them after each ride with a soft brush I clean the whole bike with.

to me, the most important thing for a winter bike is to be disciplined and to just do a fast wash after every ride, if you are lucky and have a garage. Here on Montreal streets, salt is a major issue, so unless its bone dry and fresh snow, you're getting salt spray on stuff. I'm a really really fast cleaner now, less than 5 mins bing bang boom, including chain wipe and lube spray--I use an old attachement meant to clean a car, a big floor broom shaped thing with soft bristles, that get around corners and into nooks , and it does a great job--but again, Im lucky cuz I can do it in a garage and not worry about water on the floor.
cheers
djb is online now  
Old 12-13-20, 05:35 PM
  #41  
PaulH
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 3,661
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Liked 59 Times in 43 Posts
Carbide-studded tires go on in mid-December and stay on until mid-March. I avoid using front brakes unless I know I have dry pavement. Otherwise, I pay no attention to the weather -- hell, I'm going there anyway. Non-studded tires can work. I started winter riding 60 years ago on a balloon-tired Columbia, which was quite good on snow and ice. One could broadslide the thing around a corner with one boot down for stability. I think the wide tire gave a lot of traction, compared with a typical modern bike. Some people have reported phenomenal traction with share bikes, which are similar. However, nothing, especially a car, beats studded tires on ice. Studs on ice are about equivalent to non-studs on wet pavement.
PaulH is offline  
Old 12-14-20, 05:15 PM
  #42  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 39,964

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 486 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6898 Post(s)
Liked 1,537 Times in 970 Posts
@PaulH, I'm another person who rather inadvertently discovered how good bike share bikes are in winter. I've ridden them through slush in NYC and have been impressed. When it's bad, these bikes are much preferable to my own bike. They have slick tires or close to it, and it doesn't seem to matter. The bike is heavy and most of the weight is on the rear. I don't know how wide the tires are, perhaps 1.5 inches, perhaps more.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 12-16-20, 02:34 PM
  #43  
AmelieGagnon
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
After had terrible accident last year , I don't have enough courage to try it again
AmelieGagnon is offline  
Old 12-16-20, 02:42 PM
  #44  
Riveting
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 945

Bikes: '13 Diamondback Hybrid Commuter, '17 Spec Roubaix Di2, '17 Spec Camber 29'er, '19 CDale Topstone Gravel

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Liked 244 Times in 146 Posts
Originally Posted by Helldorado View Post
Last winter I was on my usual morning commute to work. It wast 6 AM and still dark. The temperature was about 33 American Degrees. I came onto a roundabout at the top of a hill and hit a patch of ice - and down I went. My instincts, as I felt myself falling, were to protect the bike with my body. That's what I did but I banged up my left side pretty badly. Nothing broken or irreparably damaged, though. So... How do you guys deal with treacherous ice patches in the winter gloom? It makes me not want to ride when the temp approaches the freezing point of water. Stupid ice!
It's technically a temperature scale invented in the 1700's by a German-born scientist. Americans, like me, are just the idiots still using it. Though at work, in the Aerospace industry, it's all Celsius, and "mostly" metric.
Riveting is offline  
Old 12-16-20, 07:52 PM
  #45  
xyz
Banned.
 
xyz's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Midwest
Posts: 2,027
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6072 Post(s)
Liked 891 Times in 710 Posts
Originally Posted by Riveting View Post
It's technically a temperature scale invented in the 1700's by a German-born scientist. Americans, like me, are just the idiots still using it. Though at work, in the Aerospace industry, it's all Celsius, and "mostly" metric.
Bah. Celsius is just as bad. Kelvin is the only way to go. If I'm riding I need to know when I'm going to die.

xyz is offline  
Likes For xyz:
Old 12-16-20, 09:13 PM
  #46  
Riveting
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 945

Bikes: '13 Diamondback Hybrid Commuter, '17 Spec Roubaix Di2, '17 Spec Camber 29'er, '19 CDale Topstone Gravel

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Liked 244 Times in 146 Posts
[QUOTE=xyz;21836379]Bah. Celsius is just as bad. Kelvin is the only way to go. If I'm riding I need to know when I'm going to die.[/QUOTE

Sorry, I just can't bring myself to use a scale that doesn't go negative. Though telling someone that you rode last weekend when it was 312 degrees out, does have the allure of you sounding like a total badass!
Riveting is offline  
Old 12-17-20, 01:47 AM
  #47  
y0x8
Ups!
 
y0x8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Kirovo-Chepetsk
Posts: 235

Bikes: SE, Polo&Bike, Forward Indie, New Fixed Gear

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked 155 Times in 74 Posts
-20*C (4*F)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfVtx2hV-S4&t=176s
y0x8 is offline  
Old 01-08-21, 02:00 PM
  #48  
epnnf
Senior Member
 
epnnf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 230

Bikes: 2016 Masi strada vita due, 2019 Kona Dew Plus

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 158 Post(s)
Liked 36 Times in 23 Posts
Who are we all kidding? If you're traveling on ice, you need more than 2 wheels/feet.
epnnf is offline  
Old 01-08-21, 02:16 PM
  #49  
notthe1freeman
Bike Bum Extrordinare
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: CDA Idaho
Posts: 62

Bikes: 1990s specialized hard rock ultra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by grizzly59 View Post
1) if there is ice around, NEVER use the front brake.
2) let some air out of your tires. 1.75 or wider MTB knobbies with a little less air can work pretty good. Skinny road bike tires are hopeless.
3) ride with your bike upright and your weight centered always. No big sudden movements. Anticipate braking and turns.
4) drop your seatpost an inch or so. Fine tune your sense of balance.
5) nothing works very well on glare ice
All of these... And another little trick I learned growing up in Alaska...set your rear brake to slightly drag...I mean ever so slight (I use the adjusters on my handle because I like a firm, quickly responsive rear brake anyway). The reason for this is simple...its harder for the rear to shear out of on under you (which is actually an attempt to pass the front) if its always slowing, even minutely. Yes, you lose efficiency, yes it wears parts...but yes it works! I only do this on the most glare ice days. I have been ice riding for 26 years now, and lcf for the last 7... Just saying. Its my 2 cents. They are freely given and worth every penny lol
notthe1freeman is offline  
Old 01-08-21, 06:14 PM
  #50  
xyz
Banned.
 
xyz's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Midwest
Posts: 2,027
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6072 Post(s)
Liked 891 Times in 710 Posts
Originally Posted by epnnf View Post
Who are we all kidding? If you're traveling on ice, you need more than 2 wheels/feet.
Not with studs. With studs you probably have better traction on ice than you do with normal tires on dry pavement.
xyz is offline  
Likes For xyz:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.