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Lessons learnt on my first winter century ride(extremely long)

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Lessons learnt on my first winter century ride(extremely long)

Old 12-11-11, 11:15 PM
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bikenh
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Lessons learnt on my first winter century ride(extremely long)

Okay, some still need some answers but I think you should get a kick out this. Don't think a thing about blasting me for being so STUPID to even try this...any of it. I want to stop, but I can't. Give me a reason PLEASE. LOL!!

First a little background. Last year, end of April I gave up driving, voluntarily. Didn't do much biking, errand running only pretty much the rest of the year. Of the 3,000 miles...maybe 100 were pleasure miles. About this time last December I started watching the 15 day forecast and as the forecast started to show New Years Day I was noticing it was calling for highs close to 50. I started thinking you know what, let's do nice long ride(50 miler I was thinking) for NYD if this forecast holds. Christmas Day came around and I ended up doing an early morning ride of 21+ miles, temps between 13-17 degrees, and as I got home I found myself saying "you know I don't feel like stopping but...oh well, I'm home." At the same time I found myself thinking "if the forecast remains as it has so far heck with the 50 miler, let's go for a century on NYD." I walked inside the house and looked at the forecast and it was still calling for 48-50 degrees. I started looking around to see if I could find a decent route that I could use. I found one that was right at 100 miles...here in New Hampshire that isn't all that easy of a thing to do. On Thursday evening, the 30th, I was cleaning the bike and noticed my rear tire was starting to show fabric. I started questioning if I should even think of trying the ride. I looked around and everybody was going to be closed New Years Eve so I couldn't go buy a new tire. I decided to try to reinforce the tire with some duct tape wrapped aluminum flashing I had laying around. I went for the ride and had to cut it short thanks to the tire. Ended up with 82 miles for NYD. At the last stop before I got home I found myself asking the STUPID question, "you know...is this a sign of things to come." Little did I know...

Late spring came around and I started thinking about a crazy idea. I had just come through my first winter of biking. I only had two weeks, mid two weeks in March(one week temps hit 60), where I didn't ride at least three days a week. Those two weeks I rode once each week due to bike problems(waiting to replace the chain...it was totally junk and I couldn't go more than 10 feet without the chain skipping like a mad dog). As a result of this and as a result of starting to get back into doing longer rides I started thinking about attempting something STUPID, trying to get at least one 100 mile day in per week for an entire year, here in New Hampshire. Figured I would start it with a double century I was wanting to do on July 4th weekend. That ride ended up getting canned thanks to the bike and Mother Nature both. I had just upgraded the bike from a 7 speed to a 10 speed system and I still didn't trust the bike enough to take it out for any truly long haul rides away from home. I ended up waiting until the end of July, the 27th to be exact and headed out for the 200 miler. I didn't know at the time that the 200 miler also...supposedly...had 15,000 feet of climbing. I still think TopoUSA is full of crap. That ride started the insanity I have seen ever since. Now I'm sitting with 21 consecutive weeks of doing AT LEAST ONE 100 mile day per week, in some cases 3. I've rode 25 100+ milers this year and also 3 200+ milers this year. At the start of the year I figured I would only end up doing 5,000 miles this year. OOPS!!

I knew with winter coming up I had troubles last winter that would make things a bit interesting but if I planned correctly, in terms of what routes I chose, I could stand a chance at being able to pull off the crazy idea of doing a 100 mile day each week throughout the winter. I knew I had to route myself in such a way that I could get in somewhere roughly every 1-1.5 hours to go to the bathroom, get something to drink, and warm up. I had been looking ever since August at the different routing choices and knew I had several different key locations I could target and some of those main 'focal point' locations could even provide several different routes for getting there.

As everyone has said over the past several weeks this winter has been quite dry and mild across most of the eastern part of the United States and Canada. Heck I rode in shorts and tshirt last week. I didn't think I would ever do that in November yet alone December in New Hampshire. Trying to get any decent testing weather for cold weather gear hadn't really been possible until today. Given the weather forecast I had debated if I wanted to do the 100 mile ride for this week today or wait until tomorrow since the next three days are suppose to be in the 40s and today was suppose to see a high right at the freezing point...definitely the coldest day thus far all fall. I thought about it and given all the new cold weather gear I had gotten I decided lets do it today and give yourself a real test and give yourself a chance to see if you might very well be able to pull this STUPID idea off or not. I pretty much knew if I could pull it off today then I should have pretty much 90% of winter licked in bucket. Given the temps that are normally seen around here today would cover about 90% of the winter. Mid January into early February can get colder some years but generally when a major cold snap hits it doesn't last long and with proper timing I figured I could avoid most of the sub zero/zero F cold by just paying attention to the weather forecast.

I got up this morning and got dressed. Clothing was a mid weight thermal top(Duofold) with a nylon jacket on top. I thought about putting on the homemade fleece pullover I made a year or so ago but I decided to leave it off. I had just gotten my new tights yesterday in the mail and them combined with a pair of regular old fashion Wal-Mart boughten 80/20 cotton thermal pants for the bottom half. Thanks to Sixty Fiver I ended up buying a pair of Thermore mitt/gloves at Kmart on Friday. For the feet I had on a pair of polyster socks with two pair of wool sock on top of them. Thanks to Machka I took the outer pair and folded down the top/calf and in to try to give the effect of a third pair around the ankles. Granted this didn't work worth a crap. I should end up getting the booties I ordered either tommorow or Tuesday. Ever since last winter I had been wrapping the toes of the shoes in a pair of junk thermal sock that I duct taped to the shoes, for both a little extra warmth(yeah right) and added wetness/salt/sand protection. For the head I took along the regular sweatband and fleece headband(used for the ear protection). I didn't change over to them until toward the end of the main 81 mile leg of the ride. For the beginning portion of the ride I was using a neoprene face mask I bought a few weeks ago the cover pretty much everything but the eyes. It does have a nice cutout in the back of the head that helps to shed head versus keeping it trapped in. The only problem I have with it is the fact after wearing it I end up in scratch city, itching big time thanks to the chemicals still left in the neoprene from when it was made. I never used to have any trouble with neoprene but in the past year or two I sure have had trouble on either the face or the body. My old neoprene gear doesn't effect me at all just all the new stuff. My old neoprene hood, that isn't nowhere near as nice as the new face mask doesn't bother me at all.

Lesson #1: Thou shall not think that water will stay water when its 16 degrees outside

It was 16 degrees when I left the house around 7:45AM. I left with a full water bottle and after a few miles I started thinking that was probably a STUPID idea. I passed by one of the banks and it was supposedly showing 12 degrees. Normally at that time of day I would trust it since the sun wasn't shining on it yet but for some reason I don't trust it at all. I made my way toward the first planned stop around mile 19-20.

Lesson #2: Frozen nuts don't feel good

Now the key thing about where I live is the topography, its hilly with both some nice climbs and more importantly at 16 degrees, nice drops. I live on top of a hill so I always have to climb to get get home and always have a drop to start any ride. I was still tucking away on the drops and not thinking a thing about them. The first main drop came around the 30 minute mark and tucked it and didn't think a thing about it. The second drop came just before the 1 hour mark, a little over 15 miles into the ride. I was starting to think about it some as I was noticing a problem. Everything seemed fine other than it seemed like I was going to be dealing once again with getting rubbed the wrong way on the penis...getting rubbed raw. I wasn't looking forward to it at all. I knew I wasn't going to try to do anything about it until I got to the stop but I was noticing that it didn't feel good at all.

As I was riding along I kept looking down at the water bottle every 10-15 minutes and I was surprised I wasn't seeing any signs of ice forming on the inside of the bottle. At least not until I got to the first stop and then the top third or more of the one liter bottle I carry in the water bottle holder looked like it was mostly ice. I took off my helmet and headed inside. My feet were turning cold but everything else was nice and warm. I walked into the bathroom and sat down to take a crap. I started looking at my penis trying to figure how I was getting rubbed. After finishing up and wiping I stood up and then I noticed what was actually going on. I had pretty much frozen my nuts. Boy were they darn cold. Turns out I wasn't having a rubbing problem I was having a freezing problem. I decided to be smart boy and give myself a little extra warmth so after pulling up my tights I stuck one of the mitts down between my body and nuts. I turned on the warm water and let the water bottle thaw out rather quickly and then refilled it.

Lesson #3: Thou shall not try to warm up on a cold day by drinking cold water

Like an idiot I filled up the water bottle with cold water. I walked out of the bathroom and headed over to the newspaper stand. I knew I was going to stick around for a bit and warm up before I ever tried to continue on. I definitely wanted to get the penis warmed back up again. A 'bit' turned into more than 30 minutes. I found the exhaust vent from the pop/beer cooler and it was blowing out some warm air so I spent most of the time hanging around it. I finally did wake up and went back into the bathroom and poured out the cold water and filled it with warm water and started drinking it. I warmed up quite quickly after doing that. Between the cold water and the warm water I probably ended up downing 1.5 liter of water during the stop. OOPS!

I made sure the water bottle was empty before I left the convience store as I figured the only thing I would have to worry about was the cap freezing to the bottle which I knew shouldn't be too hard to take care of at the next stop in another 1.25-1.5 hours. I was questioning if I wanted to continued or head back giving what had already occured. I knew their was one errand I was really hoping to get out the way today and I was trying to figure out how I could still make it happen since I wasted so much time in the store. I decided to continue on for a bit and see how it was going to go. I knew the real objective today was 100 miles minimum. I was already trying to play around with the numbers in my head to figure out different ways I might be able to pull it off even I decided to not go for the whole 81 mile main leg of the ride.

I knew from the prior experience of frozen nuts that about the only way I could have developed the problem was by not having any kind of shell pants on, especially on the downhills. I knew I had to be leaving myself wide open when going 35-40 mph and that was causing the problem. I knew I should only have one or two more decent downhills on the rest of the ride, both of them in the next section. I decided as I got to the first drop to go ahead and pull my jacket down further to provide more protection down there. It seemed like it must have worked, as well as the temps were warming up some, as I didn't have as much of a problem with it the rest of the day as I did during the first stretch of the ride. At the second stop I still noticed it was cold to touch but it wasn't as on the verge of being painful like it was before. The second stop was only 7-10 minutes long and I downed another liter of warm water making sure the bottle was empty once again before I left.

Little did I know what was about to unfold.

Lesson #4: During the winter months...don't drink water or else

About 10 minutes down the road after leaving McDonald's, where I made my second stop, I was already having to go to the bathroom again. I was shocked. I've never had this happen before. I can always go 1+ hours between stops without any trouble at all. I found a gas station and made a quick stop and went to the bathroom. I figured it was over and I should be fine until I got to the third planned stop of the main leg of the ride. OOPS, wrong again.

I got another 20-25 minutes down the road and once again I had to go to the bathroom. This time I was in the middle of nowhere other than on a state highway just west of Concord, the state capital, and had plenty of traffic going both directions. After another 10 minutes or so I knew I wasn't going to even come close to making it to the third stop before I had to go. I finally found a side road and took a short ride down it and went to the bathroom once again. I figured more than likely I could flat out skip the planned third stop altogether. I knew when I got to the third stop I wasn't about to drink anything at all. I had WAY too much already in me.

I continued on and low and behold, about 4-5 miles before the third and final stop before getting back home I was feeling the bladder beckoning my attention once again. I started to think, normally on this ride I could easily get away with only going three times, once at each of the planned stops, what the heck is it today that I can't stop going. I knew I hadn't drank that much before I left home or that much at the first or second stop. Something totally crazy was going on...I still haven't figured it out yet.

At the third and final stop(16 miles from home, roughly 1:30PM) I changed over from the neoprene face mask to the sweat bands. No I didn't drink a sip at the third rest stop. I didn't even try. I knew I had to be so darn bloated with water already that I wasn't about to punish myself and drink anymore. I probably spent 10-12 minutes at the third stop before heading on home.

I knew I wasn't going to get the errand today as their wasn't going to be enough daylight left to get me there and back in time. I don't have any working lighting equipment...THANK GOD, so I knew I was pretty much looking for alternative ideas that I could use to pick up the extra 19 miles I knew I would need to get the 100 miles in for the day. I had thought about one idea but as I got closer to home the bladder came screaming yet again and I decided to can those plans and just get home and rethink things through. I finally got home(81+ miles) around 2:45PM and went to the bathroom again and grabbed a bite to eat for lunch. I looked at the thermometer after getting home and saw it was only 28 degrees. I also took a look to make sure just how many miles I was going to need to get to the 100 mile mark for the day. I knew I could easily run another, unnecessary errand, and grab 12.4 miles and that would take me around 1 hour which would leave roughly 40-60 minutes of usable daylight left as long as I got out of the house by around 3:15PM.

I left shortly after 3:15PM and decided to grab the miles first before making the stop by the store. Turns out my thought on how many miles the extra side trip would be was a bit on the low side, thankfully.

Lesson #5: Thou shall remember where to ride and where not to ride during the winter months even if riding there yesterday was fine...MEANS NOTHING

I left the store and headed home. Since the difference between this evening and yesterday evening was the difference between night and day still confuses me. Yesterday riding home around 4:30PM getting home about 4:40PM there was still a fair amount light in the sky. Skies were partly cloudy. Sunset this time of year, now that the earliest sunset has come and gone is still around 4:12-4:15PM. Check your sunrise/sunset tables before you argue with me. Earliest sunset is around December 7th, latest sunrise is January 4th. This evening around 4:30PM, under clear skies all day long, was much darker. I'm not sure if it was the clouds helping to reflect some of the light yesterday or what. I decided for sure I would take the slightly(.277) mile longer route home that is a back way into my house. It helps avoid a rather tricky intersection especially with the limited daylight I was dealing with. Normally I wouldn't even think of taking the route and I would stick to the highway.

All around my place their is a high water table. At my house you go down 4 feet and you hit ground water by the bucket loads. Someplaces this high water seeps up through the pavement and caused water to lay on the roads. Now on a day when the temperature never made it above freezing that isn't water anymore. I know about .25 mile down the road from my house their is such a place. I came that way home yesterday and it wasn't bad. I didn't think much about it when I decided to grab the extra .277 miles as compared to taking the highway. Today was a different story. I'm guessing more water came up overnight into today and could do nothing but freeze right to the surface of the pavement.

I'm riding on a totally unmodified Cannondale road bike. Using 700X25 tires. Not racing slicks but they still aren't far from it. I know where the icy stretch is located so I prepped for it. It was so darn dark by the time I got their I couldn't see much other than enough to tell the patch of ice had at least quadrupled in sized compared to yesterday. Instead of being patches spread across both lanes of the pavement, now it was both lanes pretty much covered from one edge of the road to the other. I ended up slowing down to a crawl and going off the edge of the pavement entirely, as long as I could to get past it. I did end up having to break through some of the thin ice toward the far end of it since I didn't want to ride through the crusty snow on the grass.

I finally managed to make it home and looked and saw I overshot my mark, 102.284 miles according to TopoUSA. Ended up with 6:42 riding time or 15.26 mph. WAY down from what I'm used to thinking of riding during the summer months. It's unbelievable how much speed you lose during the winter. I never noticed it last winter...then again I wasn't in the same kind of shape I'm in now.

As I took off the biking clothes I was surprised to find everything was pretty much dry even after having the daypack on for the last 19 miles of the ride. My feet were pretty much cold/frozen from mile 16-17 on but like someone said recently in a post about wearing facial covering during the winters he just lets his face get cold and doesn't do anything about it until it gets down to 0. I have gotten so used to the cold feet anymore I don't know what I would do if I had warm feet for an entire winter ride like today. I would probably drop over dead. I'll have to wait and see what the booties will do when they arrive.

I will have to say it was a much more comfortable ride than what I ever expected. Granted I sure wish the bladder would have been under better control that would have made the ride that much nicer. I think I'm pretty well set. As long as I don't run into a situation like 2008-2009 where it snows 3-4 inches every other day I think I should have very little trouble making 52 consecutive weeks...now trying to keep the 1500 miles a month streak alive or trying to keep the stinking 60 day by 50 mile per day average alive might be another story altogether. Like I've said before...STUPID!!
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Old 12-12-11, 07:01 AM
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chefisaac
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awesome read. Thank you. Made me laughe and smile.

Frozen nuts. Thats funny too.

You need some lights!
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Old 12-13-11, 12:15 PM
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Stupid? More like awesome. I wish I had the balls to do 100mile rides each weekend. While I've done rides in the winter here in Toronto, ON, CANADA, I've just started riding outside several times per week in the cold this year and intend to ride all winter.

I have some suggestions for a more pleasurable ride:
1) Water - forget water bottles below freezing. Get a camel back and wear it under your jacket. Put warm water/solution in it. It does two things: keeps you warm and keeps the solution warm...which in turn keeps you warm. Put the hose near your mouth somewhere you can grab it with you ride. I do this on 90KM+ rides here in Toronto. Mine holds 2.5 bottles of solution, so stopping isn't as important.

2) If you are not riding with them already, get winter cycling tights. They are expensive, but save frozen nuts/ass. The ones I have a bib tights and I wear them over my cycling shorts.

3) Always ride this time of year with some kind of lights. It's easy to get caught in the dark. For me, it's not about seeing the road - it about the stupid drivers seeing me - especially since drivers do not expect to see cyclist outside this time of year.

4) Cycling boots save the feet from getting wet/cold...and save the need for 10 layers on the feet. I use Northwave Celcuis Arctic boots from ChainReactionCycles in the UK.

5) I always ride with a change of baselayer. This may be more important on hard rides, but after 1.5 hours outside going hard, the baselayer is wet...after 2 hours or going inside, everything starts to get cold. Change the baselayer, and everything is toasty again. Of course, riding a bit cold (underdressed) may solve this problem but I'm a bit of a wimp. It is also useful if you happen to spill something on you when indoors. Wet clothes=cold ride.

6) When I know ice is around, I pull out the cross bike with studded snow tires....which means, I can forget about ice in the road. Of course, that slows me down because of the extra weight. However, I can't imaging climbing mountains on a cross bike though.

Keep riding.

Mark
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Old 12-13-11, 08:55 PM
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bikenh
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Mark,

I like the idea of the camelback. Hadn't thought about it from the perspective of you keeping it warm and it keeping you warm. Granted me keeping warm on the upper body isn't very difficult. As for the stopping I would still be stopping all the same since I still have to go to the bathroom. For me pretty much this time of year I have to stop at least every 1.5 hours to go to the bathroom unless I'm that dehydrated. During the summer I can go longer since a lot of the water is leaving the body as sweat. At least that is the way I'm beginning to see it. As I think back to last winter and the way I was doing things, peeing, compared to this past summer and now once again here this winter it sure seems like what I said above is the truth.

I wouldn't call them winter tights but I do ride with tights. Actually they aren't that bad to be keeping my legs warm??? down in the 10's and 20's. I am beginning to wonder just what is what based off what I have seen someone else post and what I have been experiencing here the past several days. I will post on this separately. This could provide some rather interesting replies. I also need to get my post count up. I tried to reply to a PM that someone sent me this morning and I couldn't. I don't have enough posts yet. DRATS!

When I use the term STUPID it all comes down to one thing. I'm just having a REAL HARD TIME believing that I have ever ridden this darn much this year. I figured I would end the year with 5000 miles and as of now I'm sitting over 11,000 miles this year. The crazy ideas that keep coming to me are just bonkers and just keeping feeding the insanity. There have been a couple of ideas that I sure as heck hope I never even attempt to follow through on. They are just that crazy. Someone else can do them I don't even want to try. Right now the only that saves my sorry soul from doing even crazier stuff than what I've already been doing is not having a lighting system on the bike. I can tell you right now I would probably be doing at least 1 200 miler every month if not every stinking week if it wasn't for the lack of daylight. Actually I do have an old blinker taillight and I do a close to 20 year old NiteRider handlebar mounted headlamp which have batteries that are toast since they haven't been used in 15 years or so. I make no attempt to try to replace them simple to keep myself under some sort of control. When it comes to biking, right now, I have no self control other than lack of equipment. Weather permitting...instead of doing a century ride on New Years Eve and another one on New Years Day coming up, I would just start out at 6PM and ride right through midnight and do a 200 miler to end the old year and start the new one. Thank God I don't have a lighting system. See how my mind is working. Some ideas are much crazier.

One thing you want to try is to start out underdressed sometime. You might be surprised at what you learn. It only takes a couple of miles of riding to warm you up. I have the disadvantage of living at the top of a hill. I always have to climb to get home...I also always have to descend to start out any new ride. Ever after descending on a cold morning I still only have to go 3-4 miles at the most and I'm riding very comfortably even when I think I'm bonkers for starting out so cold. If you live in a flatter environment, pretty much like downtown Toronto area, starting out cold...you should probably be comfortable within the first 2 miles or so and then you won't have to worry about the baselayer getting wet. I do agree with the need for the change of clothing in case something happens though. During the winter months it can be too easy to slip on ice and rip a hole in the tights or anything else and then you would be left a sitting duck to Mother Nature.

There are only two spots, since the third one got fixed last week, where their is very predictible water/ice on the roads. Everywhere else is totally a crap shoot. The high water table around here provides for both of the known spots so I generally just avoid them but I couldn't resist the temptation for an extra .25+ mile.

One question, do you have any trouble in cold weather with the mouth piece/tubing freezing over on the camelback? I fess I normally only drink when I stop to go to the bathroom. It's kinda become a habit and it seems like it works quite well for me. I've been using one liter pop bottles since they are bigger. It forces me to drink more so I keep myself better hydrated. For winter time use though the camelback idea really does sound like a much better way of doing it.
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Old 12-18-11, 07:48 PM
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Good read, entertaining for sure.

Also very impressive at your commitment to riding 100 miles once a week. Any pics of the bike?
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Old 12-18-11, 09:48 PM
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I don't own a decent camera unfortunately, just a webcam that I can hook up to the computer and fittle fart with until I can get the focus setup correctly and then through downloaded software capture a snapshot.

I can tell you I'm riding an age old, mid 90s Cannondale road bike. Using 700x25cc road tires. For this winter I have jerry rigged up a rear fender using some aluminum flashing I had laying around. Still have never figured out how I might be able to rig up a front fender though. Granted it has been so darn dry around here I haven't even really needed it yet other than maybe two or three days. Forecast for the next week is mostly dry other than maybe Wednesday. First green Christmas in a dozen years this year...it sure looks like it.

Right now I'm focused on trying to see if I can't make the 100 miles this week actually be 115-130+ depending on how fast I can ride and how short I can keep any stops. I want to see how far I can go on the shortest day of year...all daylight riding only. I did 110 two weeks ago today with an hour to spare and fighting a nice head wind the first half of the ride. I did 131 in mid November, granted in shorts and tshirt as well(60 degrees), with an hour of daylight to spare in the AM.

Don't know if I'll make the 52 consecutive weeks but I'm going to give it a shot. Rode 54+ miles today with the warmest temp being 18 degrees F this afternoon. Thankfully no frozen nuts this time. Just frozen feet still.
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Old 12-19-11, 03:01 AM
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Originally Posted by bikenh View Post
Lesson #4: During the winter months...don't drink water or else

About 10 minutes down the road after leaving McDonald's, where I made my second stop, I was already having to go to the bathroom again. I was shocked. I've never had this happen before.
But does this have anything to do with drinking water?

Once your body gets cold, its core does what it can to get warm again. One of the tactics for this is to shed water. So, I reckon that the need to pee didn't came so much from drinking something, but from getting cold because you stopped cycling for awhile.
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Old 12-19-11, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by bikenh View Post
Mark,

One thing you want to try is to start out under-dressed sometime. You might be surprised at what you learn. It only takes a couple of miles of riding to warm you up. I have the disadvantage of living at the top of a hill. I always have to climb to get home...I also always have to descend to start out any new ride. Ever after descending on a cold morning I still only have to go 3-4 miles at the most and I'm riding very comfortably even when I think I'm bonkers for starting out so cold. If you live in a flatter environment, pretty much like downtown Toronto area, starting out cold...you should probably be comfortable within the first 2 miles or so and then you won't have to worry about the baselayer getting wet. I do agree with the need for the change of clothing in case something happens though.
As a general rule, I underdress for longer rides in Toronto...but the "famous" donut ride has one working overtime...one spends a hour at a leisurely pace, general freezing, and then 30-60 mins full out sprints/hill climbs at race pace....and then the ride pulls into a restaurant for 20 mins, and back out again at race pace back into the city. It's always a challenge to stay warm, but sweat too much, and risk getting cold. Obviously for your rides, you've figured out the right balance.

Originally Posted by bikenh View Post
One question, do you have any trouble in cold weather with the mouth piece/tubing freezing over on the camelback? I fess I normally only drink when I stop to go to the bathroom. It's kinda become a habit and it seems like it works quite well for me. I've been using one liter pop bottles since they are bigger. It forces me to drink more so I keep myself better hydrated. For winter time use though the camelback idea really does sound like a much better way of doing it.
I keep the mouthpiece tucked in my jacket, just under my collar. Sometimes it gets cold, but never really freezes. If you only put it out when you stop, obviously, you can just keep the thing inside your jacket.
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Old 12-19-11, 06:28 PM
  #9  
bikenh
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Originally Posted by ijsbrand View Post
But does this have anything to do with drinking water?

Once your body gets cold, its core does what it can to get warm again. One of the tactics for this is to shed water. So, I reckon that the need to pee didn't came so much from drinking something, but from getting cold because you stopped cycling for awhile.
Interesting. I knew when faced with cold the body reacts by shutting down non essential functions first. I hadn't ever heard that is also tries to shed water. Amazing the learns you learn.

The funny thing I wasn't really cold, other than the feet after I had made the long stop and got going again. The rest of the ride I felt very comfortable. I guess I might be able to see the delayed effect of everything causing the problem to linger though.
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Old 12-20-11, 09:12 AM
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Mark,

I've decided to ride my first winter endurance challenge, the Actif Epica, out here in Manitoba in mid-February. 130km along the Crow Wing Trail between St Malo and St Boniface just to the South of Winnipeg. Besides training rides, I'm also looking for tips and ideas on how to travel and what to travel with in terms of gear and clothing. When you speak of the solution in your camelbak, what kind of a "solution" are you talking about?

I will be using my Salsa Mukluk (Fat Bike) and may invest in Salsa's "Anything Cages" to strap a couple of thermos' with tea or other hot drink / hot water to my front forks. I was also thinking of the camelbak with warm water. One of my strategy's will be to put a camelbak or Nalgene bottle with hotwater in my sleeping bag if I have to bunk down for a few hours (I've done that in the field during military training exercises).
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