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Sleestak-Tyle/Style Winter riding gloves?..thoughts?

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Sleestak-Tyle/Style Winter riding gloves?..thoughts?

Old 01-06-15, 10:17 PM
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RiseAlways
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Sleestak-Tyle/Style Winter riding gloves?..thoughts?

Anyone ever tried the Answer Sleestak gloves or the ones by Pearl Izumi? I need a pair of good gloves for winter riding,...waterproof!!
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Old 01-06-15, 10:48 PM
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You don't want waterproof gloves for winter riding unless you will be riding in 33-40 F degree rain. For below freezing conditions you want warm but wind resistant and breathable gloves. In my opinion the best approach is a medium or thick fleece glove with a removable nylon shell over the top. Easy to clean and dry out and very warm for all but expedition type conditions.

Or, if you have small, medium or large hands you can buy some good cycling gloves 1 or 2 sizes large and wear a fleece liner underneath. Problem with this is that cycling gloves are not really designed for the kind of cold you have in PA. They are more like for UK winters which are like 45 degrees F. It works better to use loose fitting ski type gloves for riding in below freezing conditions.

But you should have a pair of winter cycling gloves for fall and spring riding. Just don't expect them to work in below freezing conditions unless you have unusually good circulation in your hands.

Last edited by Hezz; 01-06-15 at 10:54 PM.
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Old 01-07-15, 07:36 PM
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However, if you are riding in 33-40 rain, the only ones I've found that work are the Giro 100 Proof gloves. Amazon has them.
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Old 01-07-15, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Hezz View Post
You don't want waterproof gloves for winter riding unless you will be riding in 33-40 F degree rain. For below freezing conditions you want warm but wind resistant and breathable gloves. In my opinion the best approach is a medium or thick fleece glove with a removable nylon shell over the top. Easy to clean and dry out and very warm for all but expedition type conditions.

Or, if you have small, medium or large hands you can buy some good cycling gloves 1 or 2 sizes large and wear a fleece liner underneath. Problem with this is that cycling gloves are not really designed for the kind of cold you have in PA. They are more like for UK winters which are like 45 degrees F. It works better to use loose fitting ski type gloves for riding in below freezing conditions.

But you should have a pair of winter cycling gloves for fall and spring riding. Just don't expect them to work in below freezing conditions unless you have unusually good circulation in your hands.
I'm thinking of riding in conditions where a little snow may fall,.. hence the sleetak gloves, but I see what you mean with breatability.

In regards to wearing a pair of regular cycling gloves with fleece gloves inside/underneath,.. the fleece with just act like a sponge and they'll be just as wet,.. (I tried it with a pair not long ago,.. figured it would work, but the sweat just layed there, then they got cold) Maybe I'm missing something though,.. its possible?
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Old 01-08-15, 10:25 PM
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Originally Posted by RiseAlways View Post
I'm thinking of riding in conditions where a little snow may fall,.. hence the sleetak gloves, but I see what you mean with breatability.

In regards to wearing a pair of regular cycling gloves with fleece gloves inside/underneath,.. the fleece with just act like a sponge and they'll be just as wet,.. (I tried it with a pair not long ago,.. figured it would work, but the sweat just layed there, then they got cold) Maybe I'm missing something though,.. its possible?
No, You are not missing anything. I've found that good breathability is better for below freezing conditions but that the insulation layers will always get soaked anyway. If you had enough breathability to keep those layers dried out you would probably freeze. My fleece glove/ cheap nylon shell approach works really well to keep my hands warm but the liner still gets soaked with sweat. But the beauty is that you can wash and dry them really easy.

I do think that it's a good idea to get a standard pair of (what I call medium thick) cycling gloves because they are really useful for cycling in 40-55 degree F conditions. So you will use them 3-4 months of the year. But I can't speak specifically to the brand that you mentioned. I have about three pair of full finger cycling gloves and I've found that they are not warm enough for below about 40 degree F in the winter.

I can say that you should stay away from ones that have a lot of hard plastic reinforcements on them as the plastic is cold and seems to pull heat out of the glove.

You might also find that those cycling gloves that you mentioned would make a good glove liner for a good wind resistant shell over the top. You will probably need to experiment a little bit until you find a solution that works for you.

I seriously made my winter gloves for about 20 bucks from 2 pair of gloves from Walmart or Shopko. I found some "waterproof" ski type gloves with a nice shell and cut out all of the lining and the waterproof membrane. Then I got a 10 dollar pair of thick fleece gloves for the liner. They are really warm.
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Old 01-08-15, 10:39 PM
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If you want to try the cheap approach that I use this is what you need:

Some cheap ski type gloves with a nylon or polyester hard shell. Kind of like these:

FLOSO Unisex Waterproof Padded Thermal Winter/Ski Gloves With Grip

Then you want some cheap fleece gloves that are kind of thick but single layered with no buckles and straps. Something like this;

http://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/polar-edge-men-s-fleece-gloves/pid-1319805?N=628476131&count=1&affcode=42&kwid=ps_cse&cid=PLA_101909045&gclid=CIisj6uLhsMCFQdqfgodnx4AB w&kwid=productads-plaid^78041069478-sku^101909045-adType^PLA-device^c-adid^61320789198


Then you've got to get some scissors and a sharp knife and dissect all the lining and insulation and loose stuff out of the ski type gloves.

Then you just wear those wind resistant shells over the fleece or cycling gloves. Makes them at least twice as warm with little weight and you can clean and dry them out easy.
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Old 01-08-15, 11:11 PM
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Good ideas guys,... I had done this to a pair of ski gloves for another thing (not cycling related) but for some reason they eventually failed!
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Old 01-09-15, 06:45 PM
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Originally Posted by RiseAlways View Post
Good ideas guys,... I had done this to a pair of ski gloves for another thing (not cycling related) but for some reason they eventually failed!
Ya, the ruggedness will depend on the quality of the shells. If you want something that will last a bit longer you will have to find a higher quality shell like a mountaineering glove shell that's made to layer stuff under.

My final solution was a pair of 50 dollar good quality ski gloves that I got at the local recreation discounter for about 15 bucks. They had a much better shell material with a semi breathable membrane.

Have had them for 5-6 years but I don't ride as much in winter anymore so I would only rate them as average durability. Because the liners get so soaked you have to wash them a lot which wears them out as much as wearing them.

The Answer Sleestak looks to me like it would keep your hands pretty warm in below freezing conditions as it's made somewhat more like a ski glove hybrid mitten. But the big issue is can you easily dry it out for the next day. Most gloves once they get soaked take a lot of time to dry unless you put them in a glove drier. Which if you have one is a good option.

I found with most of the warm gloves that I tried that most of them kept my hands warm while cycling the first day. But I couldn't get them to dry out well enough. Perhaps these newer gloves address this problem to some degree.

Last edited by Hezz; 01-09-15 at 06:51 PM.
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Old 01-25-15, 07:55 PM
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I can never have too many gloves :-)
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