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Old 11-24-04, 02:40 PM   #1
incipit
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Fuji... anyone know what year?

Anyone know what year this bike is? I got it for free from a friend who doesn't remember even where he aquired it just that he's had it forever. Was it a decent ride back in the day?
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Old 11-24-04, 03:31 PM   #2
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Hi,
part of the bike boom of the early Seventies, from the look of it.
I'm not expert, but at some point the safety levers were outlawed. That's a pet peeve of mine. A simple redesign would have fixed the problem, but no, they had to outlaw them. As a guess, 30 years old.
If you're considering it, I'd replace the brake levers with some new ones that are more comfy. If you like it, ride it. It's not special, if that's what you're asking, but it looks to be in good shape.
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Old 11-24-04, 04:03 PM   #3
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I'm really just using it until I purchase my new ride at the end of January. I really wish I could take advantage of the 2004 closeout specials going on now but, I simply just can't swing it 'till after the holidays.

You really think it's early seventies?
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Old 11-24-04, 06:07 PM   #4
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The graphics are reminescent of what Fuji was doing in the mid-'70s (i.e. block lettering on seat tube with World Championship stripes and model name on downtube) but they continued to use these graphics into the early '80s. Also the safety levers survived into the early '80s. The cable tunnels and sidepull brakes also point to something a little later. I would guess very late '70s to very early '80s, circa 1978-1982.

However, why bother guessing? Use the info at http://www.vintage-trek.com/component_dates.htm to decypher the date codes on the components. Let us know what you find. Good luck!
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Old 11-24-04, 06:50 PM   #5
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Ah haaaaaa...heehee. The Dia-comp brake code reveals Sept 1980! According to the above posted article... Wow, considering the age it is in GREAT condition! What are the chances of converting to modern STI brake/shifter combo and still utilizing the existing Components?
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Old 11-24-04, 07:27 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by incipit
What are the chances of converting to modern STI brake/shifter combo and still utilizing the existing Components?
Sure, all it takes is money.Throw away everything but the frame, fork,front wheel, Hbar and stem. I'd get rid or the brake levers and nightmare saddle and keep it as a beater or spare.
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Old 11-24-04, 07:35 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by incipit
What are the chances of converting to modern STI brake/shifter combo and still utilizing the existing Components?
Very slim to nonexistent! Save your money for the new bicycle. Those close-out specials usually last until February or march, though the pickings will be slimmer.
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Old 11-29-04, 04:09 PM   #8
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Looks kinda dangerous to me. Might not want to sink any more into it than what you paid.

But, you know what opinions are like.
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Old 11-29-04, 05:52 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by incipit
Ah haaaaaa...heehee. The Dia-comp brake code reveals Sept 1980! According to the above posted article... Wow, considering the age it is in GREAT condition! What are the chances of converting to modern STI brake/shifter combo and still utilizing the existing Components?
The fact that it has downtube shifters and not stem shifters is a good sign. Is that a forged SR or Nitto stem?

It might be worth it to modernize it somewhat if the frame isn't Hi-Ten gaspipe and it fits well. Are there any tubing stickers on the frame? I know Fuji often used their proprietary "va-lite" vanadium steel. They might also have used other Japanese tubesets on some models.

If you are going to modernize it, do it sensibly. If you can keep the levers and brakes, do it. Get some 8 speed barcons for $40 from nashbar and replace the drivetrain (chain, rear hub, cassette) with 8 speed components. That way, you get a lot more use out of an old frame without breaking the bank.
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Old 11-29-04, 07:03 PM   #10
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I like that "dropped" front end look. Keep it and update it like halfspeed advises
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Old 11-29-04, 07:05 PM   #11
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could you tell me what you mean by "saftey levers"?
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Old 11-29-04, 07:18 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by incipit
Anyone know what year this bike is? I got it for free from a friend who doesn't remember even where he aquired it just that he's had it forever. Was it a decent ride back in the day?
That is a late 70's bike, and looks like it was a quality ride for the time. Should have an all cromoly frame. The decal on the seat tube with the wreath should tell you the tubing. The forged dropouts indicate a higher quality frame. The components should all be good quality.

Fuji's were considered the rolls royce of Japanese bikes at the time this bike was built. Good quality bikes.

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Old 11-29-04, 07:35 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by ypsirider
could you tell me what you mean by "saftey levers"?
Safety levers were the extensions fitted to brakes levers so the brakes could be operated with the hands on the flat portion of the handlebar, next to the stem. They were popular on entry level bicycles from the early 1970s through the early 1980s, as most new riders favoured the more upright position permitted by riding the 'flats'. The levers were not used on most high end bicycles, because the more experienced riders that generally purchased these models were supposedly used to riding in the crouched postion, in which the brakes levers readily accessible. Unfortunately, the brake levers had to be precisely situated for the safety levers to operate effectively. Incorrect postioning could put the safety levers too low and out of reach or too high, in which case the travel was only sufficient to slow the bicycle and not stop it.

Some companies such as Sekine avoided this problem by postioning the brake levers at the factory and taping the handlebars. This prevented ignorant shop mechanics from improperly postioniong the levers. This did wonders for their reputation. The shop owners and mechanics appreciated the reduced time to assemble the bicycles, while the customers appreciated the superior braking.

The safety lever was originally invented by Dia-Compe. In return for the right to use the safety levers on their brakesets, Weinmann permitted Dia-Compe to copy their design. This is why the Weinmann and Dia-Compe centre-pull brakesets are virtual clones. Other users had to pay Dia-Compe a royalty and they made a fortune off the invention.
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Old 11-30-04, 07:25 PM   #14
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Thanks for taking time to reply. I had cheap Ross with those "saftey levers" but like you say the reach was far I did not use them. The other problem was the amount of leverage on the front brake could easily lock the front wheel, steel rims and all! scared the crap ott'a me!
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Old 11-30-04, 09:17 PM   #15
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The Tubing is 441 CHROME MOLYBDENUM STEEL, That's what the sticker says on the seat tube. According to the stamping on the Dia-Comp brake calipers the brakes are dated 09/1980... as I have previously stated so I'm guessing it's an '80 or '81 model.
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