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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 02-04-11, 10:05 AM   #1
Kabong30
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Torn, looking for some opinions.

Hey guys and gals, I'm new and I'm about to buy a bike. I'm probably every bit of 400-420 pounds and I'm torn between getting the Trek Navigator 1.0 (which I was totally sold on the other day at my LBS) and the Trek 820 (which is what I wanted when I walked in the door). The guys at the shop were super helpful and suggested the Navigator over the 820 since I'll be doing primarily street riding and that bike has a cushier saddle and street tires. My concern is the Aluminum frame over the steel of the 820. I've tried to search through some old threads, etc, but I'm still very up in the air over it. They both cost close enough to the same that the money is not the concern. And if there is a better alternative in the $400 range I'd be open to hearing that too! Anyway, thanks in advance for any help in making this decision!

Kabong
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Old 02-04-11, 10:53 AM   #2
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I wish I'd bought a Trek Fx series bike instead of the 7300 hybrid I have. I've found the front suspension to be a distraction especially when going fast downhill. If you feel you really need a Mountain bike I'd check out e-bay or craig's list. Seems like there are quite a few used mountain bikes.

Many of us, including myself, started our journey by walking. If interested in this a good pair of shoes only cost 60-100 dollars. I still incorporate walking in my program.

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Old 02-04-11, 11:02 AM   #3
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Well, I weighed in at around 240-250 when I started with a Trek 820 and I still love that bike. I would say that for a guy of your clyde-ness (no insult intended, heck you are riding to get fit anyway, right?) that you go with solid fork. My 240-250 was enough to compress the suspension pretty dramatically if it wasnt constantly maintained. And it was AWFUL hearing that fork click up and down all the time since I never took care of it...


Also, the more upright ride on the navigator might be better suited to a new rider. Sometimes the saddle-handlebar drop can be awkward when starting out.

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Old 02-04-11, 11:21 AM   #4
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Thanks guys!

FSC the points you mention are the exact reasons that I was leaning towards the Navigator when I talked to the salesman. My only worry is what my "clyde-ness" (not insulted BTW ) will do to that frame. The bike feels good under me, but that's in the store, but the steel fork and the better "geometry" really are plusses.

Jethro, I'm leaning toward a new bike mostly in order to receive support from the LBS on it and tap into that knowledge base (in addition to the pretty vast knowledge here) and of course the warranty.
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Old 02-04-11, 02:41 PM   #5
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Thanks guys!

FSC the points you mention are the exact reasons that I was leaning towards the Navigator when I talked to the salesman. My only worry is what my "clyde-ness" (not insulted BTW ) will do to that frame. The bike feels good under me, but that's in the store, but the steel fork and the better "geometry" really are plusses.

Jethro, I'm leaning toward a new bike mostly in order to receive support from the LBS on it and tap into that knowledge base (in addition to the pretty vast knowledge here) and of course the warranty.
I wouldnt worry about the frame. Trek builds their frames very well. I was worried at first when I noticed the bottom bracket sway like crazy when I would "sprint" (I think my sprints lasted all of 10-20 seconds) but I just kind of stopped worrying about it.

I would second your desire to receive support from the LBS, even if it is just having somewhere to go ask advice without feeling guilty for wasting their time, heck you bought your bike there. I did the same. I am going to go buy another bike from them in a month or two as well since I like that shop so much.
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Old 02-04-11, 03:02 PM   #6
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I like the 820 better than the Navigator. But personally I am not a fan of the comfort type bikes except for very short distances (up to 3 miles).

First off don't get hung up on the "Steel vs. Aluminum" debate. Get a bike that fits, you are comfortable on, and will ride. Second, both have the 26" wheel size so tire choices would be about the same. All of my bikes have slick or semi-slick tires on them and wouldn't cost much extra. I also thought about changing the fork on my hardtail, but for relatively short commutes (5-7 miles) I don't think it is worth it. If you are bouncing while pedaling then adjust the tension or see if it has a lockout feature.

Truthfully with the 820 I see the ability to adapt it to suit a variety of riding purposes that I just don't see with the Navigator.
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Old 02-04-11, 03:26 PM   #7
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I started out on a Trek Navigator. It's a great bike, and I still like it. It's now a loaner, and I do ride it on occasion. I also ride a Novara Randonee touring bike (steel frame), but have had some wrist and shoulder problems lately (arthritis). My ride the past two summers has been a TerraTrike Cruiser.

My first two trips down the Passage/C&O were on the Navigator pulling a trailer. It was great for riding the trail, but I found it somewhat lacking and a bit sluggish on the road (maybe the suspension had a part to play in this). YMMV

Get whatever you think you will have the most fun (and use) riding... N+1 usually comes at one point or another

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Old 02-04-11, 04:05 PM   #8
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Kabong30,
Welcome to the club!
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Old 02-04-11, 04:16 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Kabong30 View Post
Hey guys and gals, I'm new and I'm about to buy a bike. I'm probably every bit of 400-420 pounds and I'm torn between getting the Trek Navigator 1.0 (which I was totally sold on the other day at my LBS) and the Trek 820 (which is what I wanted when I walked in the door). The guys at the shop were super helpful and suggested the Navigator over the 820 since I'll be doing primarily street riding and that bike has a cushier saddle and street tires. My concern is the Aluminum frame over the steel of the 820. I've tried to search through some old threads, etc, but I'm still very up in the air over it. They both cost close enough to the same that the money is not the concern. And if there is a better alternative in the $400 range I'd be open to hearing that too! Anyway, thanks in advance for any help in making this decision!

Kabong

I think regulars are getting tired of me saying this, but the three most important factors on a bicycle purchase are:

1) fit
2) fit
3) did I say fit yet....

Don't worry about frame materials, Aluminium, Titanium, Steel and Carbon Fibre reinforced plastic are all different, the major point in frame strength is what the engineer sitting in front of the CAD machine puts in for maximum load weight. I think for a bike like the Navigators they put in about 500lbs. The last thing you worry about is the saddle, because every butt is different, and it's probably the first part you upgrade, second is likely the tires. Another thing is this is your FIRST bicycle, not your last bicycle, as you ride more and decide what kind of cycling you want to do, you will move to other bicycles. For more cycling flexibility if you can squeeze another $50 or so out of the budget the Navigator 2.0 has a triple crank, rather then the single crank of the Navigator 1.0.



see this is not your last bike, it's your first bike and the Navigator is a pretty good place to s
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Old 02-04-11, 04:38 PM   #10
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Wogster - the Navigator 1.0 only has a single crank? Then I agree - if you go for the Navigator, spend the $$ and go for the Navigator 2.0.
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Old 02-04-11, 04:54 PM   #11
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I like the 2.0 but the front suspension fork kind of threw me off, that and the suspended seat post. That fork is adjustable apparently, but I don't know if that means it has a "lock out" feature. My big thing is that I don't want to pay for components that I'm just going to destroy with my size. But for a few extra bucks to get more gears, I'm not opposed to that.

I super appreciate all the advice BTW.
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Old 02-04-11, 06:54 PM   #12
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For perspective? Not suggesting this bike, simply showing you what I did?

I bought my bike at 378lbs just before my left knee was replaced. It is a Giant Suede DX (year 2010). In the first 650+ miles I replaced the seat, and the rear wheel began popping spokes - the LBS changed both wheels for 36 spoke wheels which haven't had any issues since. While it is a 'comfort' bike, with a suspension fork, I have ridden it up to 42 miles on a ride, and my normal run is bout 28 miles. The suspension fork is the only part I wish I did not have - not because it doesn't work, or because it bottoms out - it works fine at my weight - but I can feel the loss of energy when I crank hard.

My only suggestions for you?

Ride many bikes. Buy the bike that fits you today, rather than the bike you hope or plan to grow into. The goal is to get a bike that maes you want to ride smply by looking at it~! If you out grow the bike, that'll be nothing new, but if you buy a bike that you're simply not ready for - you won't ride it a month from now.

My comfort bike is very comfortable til bout 25+ miles, then start to get sore.

Hope this helps...
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Old 02-04-11, 09:38 PM   #13
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Wogster - the Navigator 1.0 only has a single crank? Then I agree - if you go for the Navigator, spend the $$ and go for the Navigator 2.0.
According to the Trek website 1.0 has no FD.
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Old 02-04-11, 10:21 PM   #14
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For perspective? Not suggesting this bike, simply showing you what I did?

I bought my bike at 378lbs just before my left knee was replaced. It is a Giant Suede DX (year 2010). In the first 650+ miles I replaced the seat, and the rear wheel began popping spokes - the LBS changed both wheels for 36 spoke wheels which haven't had any issues since. While it is a 'comfort' bike, with a suspension fork, I have ridden it up to 42 miles on a ride, and my normal run is bout 28 miles. The suspension fork is the only part I wish I did not have - not because it doesn't work, or because it bottoms out - it works fine at my weight - but I can feel the loss of energy when I crank hard.

My only suggestions for you?

Ride many bikes. Buy the bike that fits you today, rather than the bike you hope or plan to grow into. The goal is to get a bike that maes you want to ride smply by looking at it~! If you out grow the bike, that'll be nothing new, but if you buy a bike that you're simply not ready for - you won't ride it a month from now.

My comfort bike is very comfortable til bout 25+ miles, then start to get sore.

Hope this helps...
As I told the OP, the bike he buys now is his FIRST bike, not his last bike, I think your getting near graduation point, you need something more roadish.... That does not have to be a new bike, there are lots of pre-owned, low mileage bicycles, that are hiding in cellars and garages all over the land.
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Old 02-05-11, 02:24 PM   #15
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So it looks like the die is cast. I went in and played around with the Navigator 2.0 and I'll be picking it up on Monday! Thanks for the pointers and info, folks. Turns out the front fork doesn't compress too much and it should be fine for riding, and everything else felt great. Can't wait to get out there! Also, the guys at Richardson Bike Mart are awesome. Seemed really supportive and they have a bunch of bikes (I think the guy said 1,000 there in the store). Anyway, not a plug for them necessarily, but they seem like a lot of cool people.
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Old 02-05-11, 06:57 PM   #16
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There is nothing wrong with plugging a shop that gives you great service. You might be helping clydes/athenas in the future who may be shopping in your area. Also some shops are more clyde friendly than others. There was a thread not to long ago about clyde friendly shops.

Congratulations on the new bike and happy riding.
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Old 02-05-11, 07:09 PM   #17
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There is nothing wrong with plugging a shop that gives you great service. You might be helping clydes/athenas in the future who may be shopping in your area. Also some shops are more clyde friendly than others. There was a thread not to long ago about clyde friendly shops.

Congratulations on the new bike and happy riding.
+1 Hopefully the Super Bowl will be enough of a distraction until Monday...
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