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  1. #1
    Climbers Apprentice vesteroid's Avatar
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    What to take along

    I want to get out on my new bike (giant defy advanced). I am curious as a new rider, what should I carry along with me and what should I carry it in.

    I have seen all manner of kits for flat repair, bit not sure if I should go tubes, or flat kits , or pumps , or gas inflators...you get the picture.

    I have seen bags that go under the seat, bags that go on the handle bars, and bags that go in the frame....many choices

    Does anyone have any input on a set up to start with.

    I will be doing 2-4 hour rides and trying to work my fitness level enough to do some of the passes here. Most of the passes are in excess of 4k foot climbs.

    And what about tools? Should I be carrying some sort of multi tool?

  2. #2
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
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    I like this http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...8_10000_200804. Add a spare tube and an inflation device and you got a good kit. I like this because the tools are fitted in the top and you still have room in the bottom for the tube, money or a cell phone. It also is attached securely but is easily removed to get at everything. Topeak makes some good stuff.

  3. #3
    Lover of Old Chrome Moly Myosmith's Avatar
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    For short rides, I carry a spare tube, small patch kit, tire levers, a CO2 inflator with spare cartridge, a few assorted small zip ties and a multitool in an underseat bag. A cell phone and water bottle are also good ideas.
    Lead, follow or get out of the way

  4. #4
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    2-3 water bottles.

    You could have three flats and destroy a tire.
    Have a chain jump off and break.
    Spokes also break.
    Your left crank arm can fall off.

    What you carry is up to you.
    Last edited by 10 Wheels; 03-02-12 at 11:19 AM.
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
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  5. #5
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    For day/commuting rides, I always carry 2 tubes (not all flats are patchable), two CO2 cartridges, an allen wrench set and tire "irons" in a seat bag. If you are not familiar with/adept at changing flats and/or using CO2, I suggest a hand pump and maybe a patch kit. If you have "normal" wheels, a spoke wrench cannot hurt if you know how to use it.

  6. #6
    Senior Member boy scout 161's Avatar
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    I carry a pump, 2 spare tubes, patch kit, tire levers, a small rag and a multi-tool. I never leave home without my cell phone and at least one bottle of water.
    Be prepared. Do a good turn daily.

  7. #7
    Senior Member tony_merlino's Avatar
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    I've never patched a flat. I carry a spare tube (or two, if its a longer ride), 3 tire levers, a multi-tool that has most of the common stuff, and a spoke wrench. I sometimes throw in a couple of allen wrenches in the most common sizes, just because they're easier to use than the multi-tool. Oh - and a pump, water and cell phone, of course. A lock, if I'm going to be leaving the bike.

    Not forgetting your keys is also a good idea. DAMHIKT.
    L'asino di Buridano...

  8. #8
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vesteroid View Post
    I will be doing 2-4 hour rides and trying to work my fitness level enough to do some of the passes here. Most of the passes are in excess of 4k foot climbs.
    If you're going over high mountain passes, you need a camera. And, you need to come back and show us pictures of the scenery.

    Beyond that, you need a way to deal with a flat, water, possibly some food, and what you need to be comfortable, like a wind breaker, arm or leg warmers, etc. And glasses - sun glasses are fine. You don't want a pebble or a bug in the eye while you're racing back down the mountain.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  9. #9
    Senior Member SuncoastChad's Avatar
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    Tube, patch kit, pump, lip balm, water/drinks, and Cell phone. I try to not have to "fix" things on the side of the road anymore. I used to do that before cell phones, not anymore.
    If you are in the boonies and using j"bike shoes" -- take some walking shoes - just in case you have to utilize shank's mare for a while. Cycling shoes blow chunks as hiking boots!
    Before hitting "Enter" or "Send" ask yourself: Is this true? Is this kind? Is this NECESSARY?
    I once had a Colnago/Campy bike built in Italy...then life caught up with me!
    Now I ride a Schwinn Beach cruiser to work!
    RIP: My friend Charles V. Beasley. We laughed until we cried over Opus and "Bloom County" in the '80s. Always remember "Pear pimples for hairy fishnuts?"

  10. #10
    Climbers Apprentice vesteroid's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, for those of you taking multiple tubes, and tools, what do you carry all that in. My bike came with a tiny bag under the seat that will just fit one tube, two tire irons, and an inflator with one cartridge.

    I have two water bottle cages as well.

  11. #11
    Senior Member goldfinch's Avatar
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    Yeah, I am surprise at all the stuff people can cram in a seat bag. I got a bigger seat bag for my road bike and it was a mistake as my legs will rub against it and the light does not sit straight up and down. I have both the medium and large Topeak wedges that look like this:



    In the large I can cram a small pump, CO2 with inflator, as well as a two tubes, cleat covers (or ballet slippers), my set of allen wrenches and tire levers, and my phone, and a small snack. I can't get that much in the medium but the medium fits my bike better. I like having the pump, I don't do well with CO2 so I have to give up a tube and the pump or the CO2 with the medium bag.

    I am thinking of getting a larger bag that hangs differently off the seat or a seat post rack for my summer riding as I might want a place to stash a jacket and other crap.
    Last edited by goldfinch; 03-02-12 at 12:51 PM.
    Every living thing is a GMO.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuncoastChad View Post
    Tube, patch kit, pump, lip balm, water/drinks, and Cell phone. I try to not have to "fix" things on the side of the road anymore. I used to do that before cell phones, not anymore.
    If you are in the boonies and using j"bike shoes" -- take some walking shoes - just in case you have to utilize shank's mare for a while. Cycling shoes blow chunks as hiking boots!
    Mountain shoes aren't nearly as bad as road ones - that's why I use them. They aren't nearly as good as hiking boots, either, but I think they're a good compromise.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  13. #13
    Starting over CraigB's Avatar
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    What to take depends on your mechanical aptitude, your mechanical attitude, and how far you plan to go.

    At a minimum I take at least one tube, a patch kit, tire levers, a frame pump, multitool, Road ID, cell phone and some way to lock the house and then get back in when I return. And almost always water.
    Craig in Indy

  14. #14
    Senior Member
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    vesteroid, Rule of thumb is "If you brought it, you won't need it... most of the time."

    For a new rider, the bag/kit that Jethro56 linked to is excellent, as is his advice. You can also use a handle bar bag for snacks, camera wallet and keys.

    Brad

  15. #15
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    In my seat bag: 1 tube, 1 small patch kit, a couple of tire levers, a small allen wrench set, a small crescent wrench, pliers, and a couple of slips of tyvek to use as a boot. Occasionally (if I've replaced as needed) there may be a couple of bandaids, and maybe some strips of duct tape/electrical tape.

    Strapped to my frame is a pump and my locks.



    If it's a really long ride, then I'll throw a bag on my rack containing beers and snacks.

  16. #16
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    I always carry more then what I might need. I have a true saddle bag with the rack that comes off my seat post. I like it because I like to carry a little more then what I might need.

    Tools, gloves, patch kit, chain lube, money, wallet, phone, couple energy bars, fruit and a sandwich for lunch, glasses and some winter stuff like winter gloves, face mask, etc.

    I always come more prepared then not. I do find it funny when a roady breaks down and nothing to change his flat with and to find all all he was carrying is a banana. He wanted to save weight. great job he did!

  17. #17
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
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    In a seat bag, I carry:

    • One tube
    • Patch Kit
    • Tire Levers
    • CO2 device + 3 cartridges (these are actually in my jersey pockets)
    • Spoke wrench
    • And always: cell phone.


    In the old days, I might have even carried an extra spoke or two for the rear wheel (2 diff length spokes).

    I should find a good multi-tool to carry at least some wrenches and a chain tool, but I haven't found one I like yet.

    Visit The C-Blog : the blog about cycling.

  18. #18
    Senior Member himespau's Avatar
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    My under the saddle bag has a spare tube, a patch kit (don't know how to use it, but it has directions and might need it sometime), tire levers, multitool, small bar bell wrench, nitrile gloves, bungee netting (in case I stop by the store and want to take something home) and sometimes a small adjustable wrench or phone or wallet. I've got a topeak morph pump attached to my frame, usually one or two water bottles (unless I'm using my backpack that has the hydration bladder), and my locks are usually strapped to my rack (because if I have a breakdown I'll have to leave it somewhere as we don't have a car). Lately, my jersey pockets have my keys, wallet, and phone as I like keeping them on me, but sometimes they go in the seatbag instead. Some rides I'll throw a granola bar or some nut and fruit mix in a handlebar bag and put that on the front, but not always. Also, if I've got my handlebar bag on, I'll use a chip clip to clip my cue cards or direction sheet to the handle loop on the top of the bag so I've always got the directions visible (assuming I'm using them). The bar bag usually also has in it some extra cold weather gear (balaclava, armwarmers, legwarmers, light jacket) if I'm not wearing them or room for such things if I am wearing them and anticipate the need to take them off. Yeah, I over do the preparedness thing.
    Punctuation is important. It's the difference between "I helped my uncle, Jack, off a horse" and "I helped my uncle Jack off a horse"


  19. #19
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    I don't bring my keys with me. Sounds like I'm the only one, which is kind of lonely. I trained my cat to open the door when I get back from a bike ride and let me in.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  20. #20
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    One further word of advice... tubes take a lot of room in your bag but I always take one anyway. Make sure you rotate that tube out of your bag before it dry rots!

    True story, I went on a ride once and about 10 miles from home got a flat. Dug out my spare tube, installed it and the valve stem was dry rotted. Dug out the patch kit and the glue was dried out. Started walking in my bare feet with my cycling shoes hanging on the brifters (a very handy place, IMO)

    after about a mile, some nice soul saw me walking and flat out gave me his spare tube. His patch kit glue was also dried out. Joy! It also had a dry rotted valve stem, no joy.

    Back to walking. Blisters are forming now.

    After about an hour, some guy with a triathlete zombies jersey (local bike store in Santa Monica) on came to a screeching halt, identified that I was miserable and in about the span of 30 seconds, had my wheel off, tire off (bare hands thank you) and patched my original tube. Reinstalled and went flying off and wouldn't take a dime from me.

    That's TWO people in the angry city of Los Angeles that stopped and helped a stranger out of the kindness in their hearts.

    Anyway, 1 tube, 1 fresh patch kit, CO2 inflator, usually a couple small bills, a 5mm allen wrench and a few other tiny odds and ends go with me on any ride. In case you're wondering, the bills are for purchases *or* shoring up a tire sidewall with a hole so I can get home

  21. #21
    Senior Member himespau's Avatar
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    Oh yeah, I always keep my spare tube in its original box so it doesn't get holes worn into it by the other crap I keep in my bag.
    Punctuation is important. It's the difference between "I helped my uncle, Jack, off a horse" and "I helped my uncle Jack off a horse"


  22. #22
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    If you absolutely won't do a saddle bag, and don't have panniers, you can get a tube (just one), plus a tire lever, a few CO2 cartridges and the thing you need to use them, and a multi-tool, in a water bottle. But that leaves you with only one bottle for water. The upside is it's quick and easy to move between bikes.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  23. #23
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    I fly like this! I prefer a small folding slim tool with pliers and screwdrivers on the ends (Sears ). Separate allen wrenches and a spoke wrench. This way the tools fit in the small ziper pocket within the seat pack and go undetected unlike a chubby minitool. This leaves plenty of room for my 2 tubes double wrapped in baggies with talc powder and levers.

    This allows enough extra room for me to carry a clif bar or two and a baggy of gatorade powder mix for longer rides.

    Oh and a dollar bill to use as a boot incase of the dreaded tire slice.


    tools1 by gulpxtreme, on Flickr


    tools2 by gulpxtreme, on Flickr



    If I am on a trail where water is plenty, I might even use a water bottle cut in two. Put stuff in then slide top over bottom section.


  24. #24
    Senior Member
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    Here's what I use:

    • Pedro's Tire Levers, the only ones that work consistently and don't bend/shatter/break at the worst possible moment
    • Crank Brothers Multi-17 multi-tool, though I should probably down-size to the Multi-10
    • Park CT-5 chain tool; the Crank Brothers multi-tool includes a chain tool, but this one is much better
    • Park SW-7 spoke wrench
    • A vulcanizing patch kit (ex: Park VP-1 or whatever your LBS sells; they're all the same)
    • A spare SRAM 10-speed PowerLock master link
    • Topeak RoadMorph G pump
    • A tire boot; you can buy a Park TB-2, or use a Clif Bar wrapper or dollar bill
    • A spare inner tube
    • (Charged!) Cell phone
    • A twenty-dollar bill


    I strap the pump to the top tube of the frame and everything else fits in a bag under the seat.

  25. #25
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    A twenty-dollar bill
    If you take a $20, make sure you don't forget the single. I did once and it was my bud that sliced his tire. You can bet I made him tear apart his wheel at the end of the ride.

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