Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Hybrid Bicycles Where else would you go to discuss these fun, versatile bikes?

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-25-10, 11:57 PM   #1
erdem
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Eskisehir, Turkiye
Bikes: trek fx 7.3
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
rim replacement question

i have a trek fx 7.3 which i bought about 2 months ago. i recognised that my rear wheel's rim is quite bent. when i turn the rear wheel brake pads rub into rim surface in one point. it has 700x32c stock wheels and rims. so what should be done? i haven't true rear wheel yet but will it be sufficient to true wheel or should i consider replacement of rim. if so what are quality rim recommendations (brand, size etc..)
erdem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-10, 06:10 AM   #2
irclean
Born Again Pagan
 
irclean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Southwestern Ontario
Bikes: Schwinn hybrid, Raleigh MTB
Posts: 2,242
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sounds to me like it needs to be trued; the rim is likely fine except for being a little off in, as you said, "one point". Truing a wheel isn't that difficult as long as its not too far out of whack. Ideally you should use a truing stand, and there are a number of sites that will instruct you on how to build one, or you can purchase one online or from your LBS. Otherwise a wheel can be trued by turning the bike upside-down and using the brake pads as a guide for wheel trueness. Of course, you will need a proper spoke wrench before you can do anything. There are a number of tutorials out there; a decent one can be found at http://bicycletutor.com/. If you don't feel comfortable you can always have your LBS do it, and they will have all the necessary tools, like a truing stand and a spoke tension meter. Also, they will be able to tell you if your rim indeed does need replacement. If it's not too far out of true then my advice, FWIW, is to try it yourself. It's a valuable skill to learn. You can even check for spoke tension by listening to the tone when plucked.

Last edited by irclean; 07-26-10 at 06:15 AM.
irclean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-10, 07:13 AM   #3
erdem
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Eskisehir, Turkiye
Bikes: trek fx 7.3
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by irclean View Post
Sounds to me like it needs to be trued; the rim is likely fine except for being a little off in, as you said, "one point".
thank you. it is nice to hear this

Quote:
Originally Posted by irclean View Post
Truing a wheel isn't that difficult as long as its not too far out of whack. Ideally you should use a truing stand, and there are a number of sites that will instruct you on how to build one, or you can purchase one online or from your LBS.
may you give some links to the sites about wheel building and truing etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by irclean View Post
Otherwise a wheel can be trued by turning the bike upside-down and using the brake pads as a guide for wheel trueness. Of course, you will need a proper spoke wrench before you can do anything.
as i learned 3.45mm spoke wrench size will be suitable (park tool red handle) for this job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by irclean View Post
There are a number of tutorials out there; a decent one can be found at http://bicycletutor.com/. If you don't feel comfortable you can always have your LBS do it, and they will have all the necessary tools, like a truing stand and a spoke tension meter. Also, they will be able to tell you if your rim indeed does need replacement. If it's not too far out of true then my advice, FWIW, is to try it yourself. It's a valuable skill to learn.
i already started to learn adjusting my front and rear derailleurs from bicycle tutor and park tool web sites. i am very eager to learn bike mechanics and also wheels

but for now i don't plan to true wheels my self until i have necessary tools as you mentioned. truing stand, tension meter etc..

and also there are many books on the market about wheelbuilding but i don't know which will be suitable for newbies like me:

The Professional Guide to
Wheel Building


The Bicycle Wheel 3rd Edition

The Art of Wheelbuilding

Quote:
Originally Posted by irclean View Post
You can even check for spoke tension by listening to the tone when plucked.
and also i may tune a violin by ear. hope this helps in adjusting spoke tension
erdem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-10, 08:10 AM   #4
khutch
Sumerian Street Rider
 
khutch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Suburban Chicago
Bikes: Dahon Mu P8, Fuji Absolute 1.0
Posts: 612
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
I had an accident earlier this year which I unfortunately remember no details of due to concussion induced memory loss. It is pretty clear that I must have gone over a curb at a pretty good clip though and the bike was undamaged except that both rims had a "kink" in them. It was a fairly sharp bend in a fairly small area of each rim. While I was recovering I had my LBS go over it for any damage I did not notice. It has a carbon fiber front fork and I wanted that checked by someone who knows what to look for. It was also about time for its post delivery checkup anyway. I honestly thought the rims were done for, the bends seemed too sharp to me. What do I know, they told me it was easy to true them up again and they are working fine so far. So yeah, your rims likely can be retrued and I suppose it is a good skill to learn if you want to give it a go. If you can't get it done yourself I don't think you are very likely to mess it up so badly that a local shop can't complete it for you if you should reach the point where you want to give up.

Ken
khutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-10, 08:11 AM   #5
AdelaaR
Senior Member
 
AdelaaR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Vlaamse Ardennen, Belgium
Bikes:
Posts: 3,898
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by erdem View Post
and also i may tune a violin by ear. hope this helps in adjusting spoke tension
It most definately will. Tuning a snare and tensioning a spoke are, physically speaking, almost the same thing.
AdelaaR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-10, 08:20 AM   #6
AdelaaR
Senior Member
 
AdelaaR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Vlaamse Ardennen, Belgium
Bikes:
Posts: 3,898
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I was riding with my dog on a local road my dog didn't know yet and there were a lot of cars at the time, so I used the dog's leash for a change instead of just letting him run besides me.
Unfortunately, my dog suddenly decided to stop dead and sniff something at a certain point.
My dog is quite big and sturdy, so he basicly pulled me off my bike and I was barely able to keep myself on my feet while jumping off the bike and holding it by one hand, so that the bike itself would not fall.
Long story short: my back wheel had a bend in it.
I had never trued a wheel before.
So I figured out how the spoke-tensioners work and made the wheel turn and watched the distance to the brakepads.
I didn't even have an actual spoke-tensioning-tool nor did I even know that such a device existed ... I simply used an adjustable spanner and it worked fine.
After a bit of fiddling with it ... I quickly figured out how it works as it isn't very hard ... you basicly put a bit more tension to the side you want your rim to move to, right?
I've done hundreds of miles on that wheel since then and it has been fine ever since.

So erdem, if you have an adjustable spanner, some basic technique, basic understanding of physics and a keen eye ... you should be able to fix this
AdelaaR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-10, 09:49 AM   #7
erdem
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Eskisehir, Turkiye
Bikes: trek fx 7.3
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by khutch View Post
I had an accident earlier this year which I unfortunately remember no details of due to concussion induced memory loss.
sorry to hear what happened

Quote:
Originally Posted by AdelaaR View Post
It most definately will. Tuning a snare and tensioning a spoke are, physically speaking, almost the same thing.
but dunno which spokes to compare. so i need a good to learn about bicycle wheel. which book would be the most suitable for me? for the complete newbie. i can't afford all of them i think

Quote:
Originally Posted by AdelaaR View Post
I was riding with my dog on a local road my dog didn't know yet
lol that's too funny. and your dog didn't know how to ride yet and i have never seen anyone riding with his dog.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AdelaaR View Post
So erdem, if you have an adjustable spanner, some basic technique, basic understanding of physics and a keen eye ... you should be able to fix this
thank you. i will consider your suggestions. i was daunted by the idea of truing wheel my self because i read something about sheldon brown's site. he says:

I would suggest that you not mess with your spokes unless you have mastered most other aspects of bicycle maintenance.

but after your comments i think i may dare to true them by myself thanks a million!
erdem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-10, 10:01 AM   #8
AdelaaR
Senior Member
 
AdelaaR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Vlaamse Ardennen, Belgium
Bikes:
Posts: 3,898
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by erdem View Post
lol that's too funny. and your dog didn't know how to ride yet
I don't think you got what I meant.
My dog does indeed not know how to ride and probably never should.
My dog is very good at running right besides me while I bike though, as I tought him to.
What I meant is that my dog didn't know the exact road I was riding on yet, since he had never been there ... and that is why I decided to put the leash on him at that time.
AdelaaR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-10, 10:45 AM   #9
erdem
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Eskisehir, Turkiye
Bikes: trek fx 7.3
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdelaaR View Post
I don't think you got what I meant.

What I meant is that my dog didn't know the exact road I was riding on yet, since he had never been there ... and that is why I decided to put the leash on him at that time.
in fact i exactly understood what you meant only i wanted to joke about it

because at first glance i read it quickly and thought that your dog knows how to ride. i re read and got what you meant. also i have never seen a cyclist riding with a dog. and this seemed me funny
erdem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-10, 02:20 PM   #10
irclean
Born Again Pagan
 
irclean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Southwestern Ontario
Bikes: Schwinn hybrid, Raleigh MTB
Posts: 2,242
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by erdem View Post
in fact i exactly understood what you meant only i wanted to joke about it

because at first glance i read it quickly and thought that your dog knows how to ride. i re read and got what you meant. also i have never seen a cyclist riding with a dog. and this seemed me funny
There's the easy way:



And then there's the hard way:

irclean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-10, 02:27 PM   #11
irclean
Born Again Pagan
 
irclean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Southwestern Ontario
Bikes: Schwinn hybrid, Raleigh MTB
Posts: 2,242
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here are a couple of links about home-built truing stands:

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...e+truing+stand

http://miketechinfo.com/new-tech-whe...truing%20stand

I especially like the one pictured on post #6 of the following thread (BTW he referenced a link from Mike T's website above):

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...e+truing+stand

Last edited by irclean; 07-26-10 at 02:31 PM.
irclean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-10, 03:21 PM   #12
erdem
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Eskisehir, Turkiye
Bikes: trek fx 7.3
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i really didn't mean to cause any offence. hope adelaar doesn't gets me wrong

i also browsed through some websites about wheel truing:

http://bicycletutor.com/wheel-truing

http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=81

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcZ1jjB_AdQ

http://www.bbinstitute.com/dl/dx_demo_chapter_17.pdf

and i am starting to be familiar with the subject. barnett's manual is the most detailed and the longest tutorial.

it makes me feel sleepy
erdem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-10, 04:26 PM   #13
AdelaaR
Senior Member
 
AdelaaR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Vlaamse Ardennen, Belgium
Bikes:
Posts: 3,898
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I am very easily offended and when I am ... I usually give my dog a secret command to go beserk and kill everyone in the room ... he's half husky and half stafford so watch it

Funny picture of the dog sitting on the biker irclean!
AdelaaR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-10, 04:56 PM   #14
erdem
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Eskisehir, Turkiye
Bikes: trek fx 7.3
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdelaaR View Post
I am very easily offended and when I am ... I usually give my dog a secret command to go beserk and kill everyone in the room ... he's half husky and half stafford so watch it
lol i remember this berserker stance from somewhere else. i think you like computer games. maybe wow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by erdem View Post

and i am starting to be familiar with the subject. barnett's manual is the most detailed and the longest tutorial.

it makes me feel sleepy
i have a look at barnett's manual about wheel truing. but i am not sure whether i understand it correctly so i wanted to ask you.

first of all for lateral adjustments we may come across two situations. let's assume that this is our rim. on the left side there are A, C, E and on the right side there are B,D and F nipples.



if caliber is rubbing left between the dotted area (which is opposite of a right-side spoke) than we should tighten the D nipple 1/2 turn clockwise.



and if there is a rub (again left side) between two right side spokes (dotted area) first we check the right side spokes tightness. if one of them is looser we tighten it 1/2 turn else if they seem equally tight then we tighten them both 1/4 turn.

for lateral adjustments all we need to do is this? and from a top point of view are nipples direction of rotation is correct? if i am not mistaken if nipple rotates clockwise than also rim will turn clockwise.

Last edited by erdem; 07-27-10 at 05:00 PM.
erdem is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:06 PM.