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  1. #1
    Campy or bust :p cryogenic's Avatar
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    I just bought a Specialized HR Pro Disc the other day and have decided that I don't care for the fork that came on it.. I'm a very light rider (130 lbs) and don't do much hardcore offroad riding. The bike comes with a Marzocchi MZ Comp 100mm fork that weighs 5.2 lbs. The SID Race weighs 2.87, which is a HUGE weight savings over the Marzocchi. I don't feel like I need 100 mm of travel and would like to shave some weight off the bike. Would stepping down from 100mm of travel to 80mm of travel effect the geometry negatively in any way? If so, would it be a big problem or something I could deal with? I do also realize that I would be moving from an elastomer fork to an air fork. I do mostly commuting/urban riding. Would an air fork offer any benefits for this type of riding?

  2. #2
    Senior Member swifferman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cryogenic
    I just bought a Specialized HR Pro Disc the other day and have decided that I don't care for the fork that came on it.. I'm a very light rider (130 lbs) and don't do much hardcore offroad riding. The bike comes with a Marzocchi MZ Comp 100mm fork that weighs 5.2 lbs. The SID Race weighs 2.87, which is a HUGE weight savings over the Marzocchi. I don't feel like I need 100 mm of travel and would like to shave some weight off the bike. Would stepping down from 100mm of travel to 80mm of travel effect the geometry negatively in any way? If so, would it be a big problem or something I could deal with? I do also realize that I would be moving from an elastomer fork to an air fork. I do mostly commuting/urban riding. Would an air fork offer any benefits for this type of riding?
    Upgrading to an SID would be complete over kill for your purposes. Heck the Hard Rock is overkill for your purposes. Can you return it and get a road bike? You seem like a road bike kinda guy.

    If you can't, don't upgrade it as you wouldn't see a performance boost anyways because you wouldn't be riding it in a way that would warrant a performance boost. Also, Does weight really matter if you're not racing?

  3. #3
    Just give'er. hooligan's Avatar
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    Okay, are you gonna put a race class fork on your lower class bike? It's so overkill for your purposes. Sids are meant to go off road. I wouldn't pay a friking huge amount of money to make my bike go faster on the road! Return the dang bike and get a CX bike if you want to ride on the road with an OFF ROAD CROSS COUNTRY RACE CLASS fork.

    Sorry, I just had to rant.

  4. #4
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hooligan
    Okay, are you gonna put a race class fork on your lower class bike? It's so overkill for your purposes. Sids are meant to go off road. I wouldn't pay a friking huge amount of money to make my bike go faster on the road! Return the dang bike and get a CX bike if you want to ride on the road with an OFF ROAD CROSS COUNTRY RACE CLASS fork.

    Sorry, I just had to rant.
    Settle down Beavis... I think he gets it.

  5. #5
    Senior Member swifferman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raiyn
    Settle down Beavis... I think he gets it.
    woot my post was useful

    Someone award me one of those technologically advanced cookies.

    But seriously, if you want to buy the SID (and send it to me) by all means go ahead.

    A road bike would suit you well (he repeats)

  6. #6
    Campy or bust :p cryogenic's Avatar
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    Actually yeah... I can't stand having a heavy bike especially since my area is insanely hilly. Honestly, I wish there was a decent light air fork out there with about 60-80mm of travel that didn't cost $500. I'm extremely lacking in the muscle department and picking up my bike in its current state to carry up stairs and such is almost unbearable. The bike probably weighs 30+ lbs as-is. I'd like to shave about 5lbs off that if at all possible. I also don't care for a road bike since that limits me to exclusively on-road riding. We have trails and such around here that I ride on my days off and getting a road bike would nix that idea entirely. Plus, I'm ridiculously flat-prone from picking up random crap on our roads around here (nails, glass, staples, etc). Previously when I commuted, I averaged at worst two flats a week, 4 a month at best. At any rate, I understand that the SID is probably more fork than I need, but I can't find anything else under 3.5 lbs that is any cheaper.
    Last edited by cryogenic; 10-23-04 at 06:09 PM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member swifferman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cryogenic
    Actually yeah... I can't stand having a heavy bike especially since my area is insanely hilly. Honestly, I wish there was a decent light air fork out there with about 60-80mm of travel that didn't cost $500. I'm extremely lacking in the muscle department and picking up my bike in its current state to carry up stairs and such is almost unbearable. The bike probably weighs 30+ lbs as-is. I'd like to shave about 5lbs off that if at all possible. I also don't care for a road bike since that limits me to exclusively on-road riding. We have trails and such around here that I ride on my days off and getting a road bike would nix that idea entirely. Plus, I'm ridiculously flat-prone from picking up random crap on our roads around here (nails, glass, staples, etc). Previously when I commuted, I averaged at worst two flats a week, 4 a month at best. At any rate, I understand that the SID is probably more fork than I need, but I can't find anything else under 3.5 lbs that is any cheaper.
    Then get a hybrid bike. Gravel Paths do well when riding a hybrid. Why do you need 60-80mm of travel for an urban style of riding? You'd need 10-30mm maximum.

    Here's one that would suit you nicely:


    Here you are http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2004/citybike/7500.jsp

    EDIT: it will work, but that's like asking if a ferrari engine will work in a civic's body. it will, but it's not practical. If you'd like (and it would cost around the same or a little less), you can just change your fork to a rigid fork and that will save you more then 5 lbs. or so. You'd still do fine on gravel paths and when riding on the road it would be even better (No waste energy going into a front suspension system).

  8. #8
    Work hard, Play hard forum*rider's Avatar
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    how about....a rigid fork?

    You can still ride the trails with a rigid and it would signifigantly decrease weight and increase efficiency.

  9. #9
    Senior Member swifferman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by forum*rider
    how about....a rigid fork?

    You can still ride the trails with a rigid and it would signifigantly decrease weight and increase efficiency.

    Lol, I just edited my post with that.

    High fives are in order!

  10. #10
    Campy or bust :p cryogenic's Avatar
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    Again, my question isn't SHOULD I... The issue is that Specialized claims it's designed for a 100mm travel fork... I don't want that much travel. Will swapping it out with a lower travel fork cause any problems? money isn't an issue, I could give a flip less about spending $450 on a new fork. The question is will it work? I basically want a fork that I can beat the everloving crap out of on the road and a few times a month take off road and beat the crap out of it there too. The Manitou Black was another fork I was looking at... it clocks in @ 3.4 lbs, which isn't too bad and probably not noticeable over the 2.87 lbs

    and as far as that Trek goes, I looked at it, but it's already more expensive than the bike I bought and wouldn't handle the place I go to ride off-road... Plus it has the GPS metro which weighs more than the fork I have now.

  11. #11
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Swiff there's urban and then there's URBAN. Urban riding - (the more common definition on this forum) is akin to Freeriding

  12. #12
    Senior Member swifferman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cryogenic
    Again, my question isn't SHOULD I... The issue is that Specialized claims it's designed for a 100mm travel fork... I don't want that much travel. Will swapping it out with a lower travel fork cause any problems? money isn't an issue, I could give a flip less about spending $450 on a new fork. The question is will it work? I basically want a fork that I can beat the everloving crap out of on the road and a few times a month take off road and beat the crap out of it there too. The Manitou Black was another fork I was looking at... it clocks in @ 3.4 lbs, which isn't too bad and probably not noticeable over the 2.87 lbs

    and as far as that Trek goes, I looked at it, but it's already more expensive than the bike I bought and wouldn't handle the place I go to ride off-road... Plus it has the GPS metro which weighs more than the fork I have now.
    I know your question is Should you, but it really shouldn't be your question. The fork weighs more, but the entire bike does not (I think).

    I don't really see how spending $450 on just a fork is wise for you, seeing as it costs almost the same as your bike. You can add $200 or so if money isn't an issue and have 2 bikes then. One for your gravel paths and then one for your urban riding.

    I didnt' know that Raiyn. Thanks. But is that what he is referring to? Sounds like he means sidewalks and such?

  13. #13
    The Rabbi seely's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by swifferman

    I didnt' know that Raiyn. Thanks. But is that what he is referring to? Sounds like he means sidewalks and such?
    Urban riding:


  14. #14
    Just give'er. hooligan's Avatar
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    Lol. You really shouldn't be asking us this question if you want a light fork on such a good bike. I think that it's not your bike. YOU need to tone up, buddy. You can dish out that much money on your fork, that's your deal. Trust me, don't be a whiner. Get stronger and ride. It's not worth using a sid for simple deal. If you wanna bash it out, get a freeride. Sids aren't mean to be abused.

    What you seem to be saying

    Im gonna ride lightly
    Im gonna bash the living crap out of it
    Im gonna bash the living crap out of it off road.

    They do not mix. Light won't handle that. Price is gonna be up. It won't harm your hardrock to have lower travel (correct me if Im wrong), but it will if it goes above the suggested travel. You need a freeride fork. And those are not light. You won't get something that is really light and strong.

    Go out and ride. You'll be stronger soon. Don't whine about your bike.

  15. #15
    Just give'er. hooligan's Avatar
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    Also, how old are you. I'm as weak as can be and I carry my 37 lb kona scrap up and down stairs! What the heck is going on? Tell us what you want, clearly, tell us what you are. Weak, strong?

  16. #16
    Campy or bust :p cryogenic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by swifferman
    I know your question is Should you, but it really shouldn't be your question. The fork weighs more, but the entire bike does not (I think).

    I don't really see how spending $450 on just a fork is wise for you, seeing as it costs almost the same as your bike. You can add $200 or so if money isn't an issue and have 2 bikes then. One for your gravel paths and then one for your urban riding.

    I didnt' know that Raiyn. Thanks. But is that what he is referring to? Sounds like he means sidewalks and such?
    Both, actually... I commute to and from work, so that would be roads/sidewalk/etc... and when I'm just out riding I do more along the lines of the 2nd definition (curbs, stairs, obstacles). The current fork is a Marzocchi MZ Comp, which doesn't ride very bad, but the bike is heavier than I would like. I figured the fork being stupidly heavy would be the first place to shave weight. The wheels are ok, and upgrading them won't make much difference in weight from what I can tell. I've already traded out to a folding-bead tire (they did it for free). Also, I'm a light rider in that I weigh between 120-130 lbs, not that I ride lightly. I'd say a SID could handle ME abusing it since I'll never weigh much more than 130-135.

  17. #17
    Campy or bust :p cryogenic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hooligan
    Also, how old are you. I'm as weak as can be and I carry my 37 lb kona scrap up and down stairs! What the heck is going on? Tell us what you want, clearly, tell us what you are. Weak, strong?
    I'm 25, 5'7, weigh 130, and I'd consider myself pretty weak up top. My legs are reasonably strong, but I have insanely weak arms (to the point that lifting anything over 40 lbs makes my arms hurt for a day or two)

  18. #18
    Just give'er. hooligan's Avatar
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    Hmm...try going on monkey bars when you find them, seeing as you're not to heavy and I could lift you. Then, work on doing 50 push ups a day (not in a single try). Then go up to 200, then 400. At one point, in grade 4, I was able to do 200 push ups in about 4 minutes. It was tiring.

  19. #19
    Campy or bust :p cryogenic's Avatar
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    pushups or pullups? I can't even do a single pull-up as it is... pushups, I've never bothered trying. I'd rather just compensate by having a lighter bike than by actually doing pushups or pullups to compensate my lack of strength. It's easier that way. I just weighed my bike and it weighs in @ 30 lbs right now. I'd like to get down to 26 or 27 lbs if at all possible. I figured the fork would be a good place to start and the SID was the lightest I could find.

  20. #20
    Just give'er. hooligan's Avatar
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    It's the rider, not the bike, in this case.

  21. #21
    Senior Member swifferman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cryogenic
    pushups or pullups? I can't even do a single pull-up as it is... pushups, I've never bothered trying. I'd rather just compensate by having a lighter bike than by actually doing pushups or pullups to compensate my lack of strength. It's easier that way. I just weighed my bike and it weighs in @ 30 lbs right now. I'd like to get down to 26 or 27 lbs if at all possible. I figured the fork would be a good place to start and the SID was the lightest I could find.

    Don't bother with the push ups or pull ups stuff unless you want to actually work out. hooligan's just miffed at what you're going to be doing with the fork.

    but working out is a good idea, just not entirely relevant to this thread.
    How about buying another bike then for $450, one without a suspension fork on it. http://www2.trekbikes.com/Bikes/City...0_FX/index.php
    http://www2.trekbikes.com/Bikes/City...0_FX/index.php

    Those bikes will weigh less than your Hard Rock even with the SID and are both less then $450.

    "Is a lighter bike the fountain of youth? The September 2003 Bicycling Magazine has a chart that makes it easy to quantify the performance gains from light weight. James C. Martin, Ph.D., assistant professor in the department of exercise and sport science at the University of Utah provided some interesting calculations that make the cost of weight very clear.

    He posited a 5 kilometer, 7% grade. That's a good, stiff climb. The legendary Stelvio climb averages 7.5%. He further assumed a rider who can kick out 250 watts. A 160 pound rider will take 19 minutes and 21 seconds to get up the hill. Every 5 pounds added make the trip up the hill take 30 seconds longer.

    That means each added pound adds 6 seconds to the time it takes to get up this hill. That is only 6 seconds on a stiff, 20 minute climb."

    And that's for a road bike, it will make even less difference on an MTB.

    Link: http://www.smartcycles.com/bike_weight.htm

  22. #22
    Senior Member swifferman's Avatar
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    And also some info from our very own bikeforums discussing weight

    http://www.bikeforums.net/archive/index.php/t-9079

  23. #23
    Campy or bust :p cryogenic's Avatar
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    I'm actually aware that it won't make THAT much of a difference in climbs and such, but I've generally found lighter bikes more maneuverable and easier to pick up, throw on my shoulder and carry up a couple of flights of stairs. I know this sounds crazy, but I like the frame on that bike pretty well (enough to deal with it for a year or so) and my plan is to upgrade most of the components on it and then eventually just buy a nicer frame and swap the components. Yes, it would be cheaper to just save the required amount of money and buy a whole new bike, but that's no fun.

  24. #24
    Campy or bust :p cryogenic's Avatar
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    As a side note, I found an 04 Psylo XC which has adjustable travel and only weighs 4.28 lbs. I can get it for under $300, so I may go that route. Shaving a pound off and adding more adjustability for $300 doesn't sound too bad. Also there's the Pilot SL, which is 4.34 lbs and has a handlebar mounted remote lockout lever. It's only $239 and seems to be more or less what I'm looking for in a fork. I just wonder why full-air forks are so insanely expensive in comparison to elastomer forks.... more expensive to make them? Most lighter riders I've talked to around here much prefer air forks over elastomer, but I guess everyone has their preferences.

  25. #25
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    get a rigid fork. you can shave insane amounts of weight, often for less then $100.

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