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  1. #1
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    I am now wearing a soft cast since breaking my fibia while riding the Linear, in a slow turn going down hill, and putting my foot down to hold the bike up.
    Started back on my Linear recumbent today and rode about three miles. The bike becomes hard to handle at low speed, 6 MPH, and wants to fall over in a tight turn. Had to put my leg down quickly to save a fall,while going down hill,6 MPH, almost a repeat the way I broke my leg the last time. Could it be the USS,and turning in the middle of a down hill, or the Linear brand bike. More practice on level ground? Nothing is level here, so turning in the middle of a hill is hard to avoid. Any opinions? I am new to recumbents.
    I have much experience on road bikes. Is the Linear recumbent a good bike?

  2. #2
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    My first recumbent was a Cannondale which I rode for probably a few hundred miles. It quickly became clear that, if I wanted a smooth ride at low speed, I had to use a light touch and learn not to over steer. When I acquired a Linear, which I had briefly intending to resell, I found the handling quite pleasant even at fairly low speeds--less twitchy than the Cannondale. But, because the USS was new to me, the riding that I did was in a large parking lot. If I had intended to keep and ride it, I would have spent another hour or two practicing in the same circumstance. The only other thing that I can think of is to advise that, if the seat is reclined, make the sure seat back is pretty vertical during your learning period. Also, I was never a foot-down-while-turning kind of rider (my clever friends did that). It would seem to be counterproductive for most recumbent riding circumstances--position relative to the ground and all. But then I've followed your earlier post and you would now be an authority on this principle.

    I have had USS for some time now, but I have also removed all concerns about road surface, unclipping, putting my feet down, etc.--I ride a trike. (However, if I were to look at two wheels, the new Longbike looks VERY interesting, and the riding position is the same as the Linear.)

    Practice a lot first, then enjoy what seems to me to be a fine machine. Speedy recovery and all.

    Chip

    PS I have used clip-in pedals on all my recumbent riding. While a bit un-nerving in some circumstances, it does make you perform with your hands via handling rather than simply put your foot down. The game one learns to play is how long you can keep your feet on the pedals (one mustn't forget to practice speedy UNclipping). (While on a recumbent one can't do the same, it reminds me of those road bike guys at the stoplights still clipped in while balancing--but then they're probably the same cleverer-than-me guys who used to put their foot down on tight turns.)

  3. #3
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    Yes, the Linear is comfortable and has a good ride. Today I rode in a big empty church parking lot for 1/2 hour. I did slow turns and used the USS to make very small corrections and kept my foot up. The length of the Linear is 7 foot six inches, so I see the problem-- wide turns only and then they have to be made very carefully, with very careful steering corrections. It is not a mountain bike. It is fun to ride, but there is a learning curve.

  4. #4
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    Great! This will work. When you get good at it, then you'll be well able to tell how you like riding this and other recumbents--for comparison and such. Don't forget trikes. They're extremely fun, but best not to test without a full checkbook.

    Chip

  5. #5
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    I bought a trike for my wife, and I am going to test ride it. She wants me to ride a trike, says I am getting old, going on 70. I feel like 30.

  6. #6
    sch
    sch is offline
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    I remember my first ride on a bent, an out of production SWB and a P38, both having RANS type
    ASS. I quickly discovered a finger tip hold on the steering bar resulted in much better control
    than a tight fisted approach. Didn't buy either and ended up with LWB Rotator Pursuit. It doesn't
    mind a tight fisted approach and in fact is one of the few recumbents you can actually pull back
    on the bars going up hills to increase torque. It has a wide turning radius as well, taking at least
    1.5 lanes of the road for a u turn. Below 2-3mph it is easy to turn too sharply and stutter the
    front wheel with potential loss of control. My first ride was also a church parking lot and paying a
    lot of attention to uphill starting and radius of turning that was practical. Still took 200-400mi before the side to side wobble diminished to perhaps 2x the regular bike wobble. Now I can ride down the white
    line with only occasional deviations off of it. Remember to downshift before each stop, especially on
    an uphill. Steve

  7. #7
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    What kind of trike? There are a whole bunch of opinions on these things. I have, in hand (under buns?), a Logo for testing that appears will be put up for sale by the owner. My trike is a TT, but the Logo has some really interesting characteristics that I would really like to have. Definitely the best seat I've sat on.

    Chip

  8. #8
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    I like my lwb above seat steering Sun EZ Rider because it is so easy to drop a leg when in tight spot.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Ben
    I bought a trike for my wife, and I am going to test ride it. She wants me to ride a trike, says I am getting old, going on 70. I feel like 30.
    The trike may solve the low speed stability issues, but if you are in a hilly area, you can have some interesting high speed issues on a trike. Some learning involved there too.

  10. #10
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    My Bikes
    76 schwinn tandem,old hard rock mt bike, old old centurium rd bike, 84 trek 640 touring bike, a new v-rex,
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Ben
    Yes, the Linear is comfortable and has a good ride. Today I rode in a big empty church parking lot for 1/2 hour. I did slow turns and used the USS to make very small corrections and kept my foot up. The length of the Linear is 7 foot six inches, so I see the problem-- wide turns only and then they have to be made very carefully, with very careful steering corrections. It is not a mountain bike. It is fun to ride, but there is a learning curve.
    hi, have spent the last two months learning to ride my swb. crashed hard a couple of times at first, I'm the kind of person who needs to be humbled sometimes! I can't believe how much better it gets. I thought I would have this under control in a week, since I'm so cool, but at three hundred miles I'm still finding plenty of things to practice, right now I'm working on talking to and looking at someone along side of me without weaving! hang in there, I have already put a couple of my other bikes up for sale! Dave

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