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Old 11-30-16, 01:19 PM   #1
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Etiquette

What is the general consensus in the cycling community?
When you pass someone on your bike do you let them know before you do so? With a bell or verbally?
Do you expect others to let you know when they are passing?
Does in annoy you when you are passed with out warning or do you not care?
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Old 11-30-16, 01:37 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Tombaatar View Post
What is the general consensus in the cycling community?
When you pass someone on your bike do you let them know before you do so? With a bell or verbally?
Do you expect others to let you know when they are passing?
Does in annoy you when you are passed with out warning or do you not care?
It depends on the context and riding environment.
Commuting in an urban environment, on a MUP, a rural F&M road, an MTB trail or in a paceline?

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Old 11-30-16, 01:41 PM   #3
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It depends on the context and riding environment.
Commuting in an urban environment, on a MUP, a rural F&M road, an MTB trail or in a paceline?

-Bandera


Urban, commuting or just riding on a designated hike bike trail.
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Old 11-30-16, 02:26 PM   #4
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Urban, commuting or just riding on a designated hike bike trail.

Commuting I behave just like anyone else on the roadway to be aware of all elements of traffic and situations which means communicating only as necessary with cars, cyclists and pedestrians for my safety.
A reserved "good morning" stopped at a traffic control to other bike commuters is optional, but pleasant.

The MUP and Trails are a mis-mash of bikes, joggers, baby strollers, dogs and the deranged all proceeding in a random mix of speeds and directions.
My town bike is equipped w/ a cheerful bell that has a carrying tone to alert all to my presence when overtaking and the fact that "It's a Bicycle!".
With headphone users a waste of effort, although some appreciate a cheerful "Ding" instead of verbal abuse.
The verbal alert "On your Left" generally results in a step/swerve directly to the left, with unfortunate results.

If I'm overtaken in either environment being similarly alerted is appreciated but becoming rare.

Be safe.

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Old 11-30-16, 11:01 PM   #5
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What is the general consensus in the cycling community?
When you pass someone on your bike do you let them know before you do so? With a bell or verbally?
Do you expect others to let you know when they are passing?
Does in annoy you when you are passed with out warning or do you not care?
I ring bell first, then "bike back" twice as I approach. If no sign of recognition (earphones, deaf, Pokémon Go...) I slow down more. Then a "good day" or "thank you" as I pass.

I find "bike back" better than "OYL" because I let them make the first move and I go the other way.

I don't have a problem with silence when I'm on my bike as I use a mirror and a cyclist can't sneak up on me. When I'm running it bothers me when cyclists don't alert me, and I get red hot if they go past me closely at high speed. A young lady died on the Katy trail a few years ago due to a bike/pedestrian collision. I don't want anyone around me to get hurt.
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Old 11-30-16, 11:15 PM   #6
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When you pass someone on your bike do you let them know before you do so? With a bell or verbally?
No. I look back to make sure there are no cars coming and then I pass them as far to the left as possible.

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Do you expect others to let you know when they are passing?
Of course not.

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Does in annoy you when you are passed with out warning or do you not care?
I really don't care. And by the way - "without" is one word in this context.
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Old 11-30-16, 11:21 PM   #7
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If you have enough room to pass without startling the other person (at least 3 feet), then just go ahead and pass. Ringing a bell or calling out can be annoying as well. If you can't or won't pass by a wide distance, then some negotiation with the other person is a good idea.
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Old 12-01-16, 12:20 AM   #8
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I don't let people know I'm passing them and don't like to be told I'm being passed. I can see them in my mirror and it's annoying to me if they have to announce it to the entire world that they're passing.
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Old 12-01-16, 07:29 AM   #9
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No. I look back to make sure there are no cars coming and then I pass them as far to the left as possible.


Of course not.


I really don't care. And by the way - "without" is one word in this context.


I have yet to see a car on the hike bike trail (I looked up what "MUP" means)
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Old 12-01-16, 08:28 AM   #10
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As I had stated I ride almost exclusively on MUP's, which are 8 to 10 feet wide usually. There are some more narrow (sections of Braes Bayou) so it is almost impossible to pass by a wide margin.
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Old 12-01-16, 08:43 AM   #11
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As I had stated I ride almost exclusively on MUP's, which are 8 to 10 feet wide usually. There are some more narrow (sections of Braes Bayou) so it is almost impossible to pass by a wide margin.
I fitted a set of "mudguards" for a friend who commutes on a narrow MUP.
Since we were in the depth of a years long drought she was questioned on their utility.
One word answer: "Dogs."

The British euphemism for fenders aka "mudguards" dates to the time when draught animals and flocks of sheep were common on roadways depositing ahem: "Mud".
In this case dog-mud on the MUP.

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Old 12-01-16, 08:45 AM   #12
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I don't let people know I'm passing them and don't like to be told I'm being passed. I can see them in my mirror and it's annoying to me if they have to announce it to the entire world that they're passing.
Not sure if trolling or just the worst opinion ever?

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As I had stated I ride almost exclusively on MUP's, which are 8 to 10 feet wide usually. There are some more narrow (sections of Braes Bayou) so it is almost impossible to pass by a wide margin.
Look, everyone has a different thing they do, but when it comes down to it, the right thing to do, is to always announce. Always. Whether it's verbally, or a bell. Just like how the right thing to do when driving is to always signal a lane change, or a turn with your signal light. No, not everyone does it, but they should.
I ride the MUPs here in HTX almost daily when commuting to work (Terry Hershey), and on weekends through Bush Park, and out on the roads toward Fulshear. Especially on paths with walkers and runners, I cannot tell you how many "thank you!"s and waves I get when I announce I am passing. I do the same thing for cyclists I pass.

The reason? Nothing can cause more danger than someone being surprised you're all of a sudden RIGHT THERE. It may discombobulate a cyclist and cause them to veer and crash. This almost happened to me once. You never know when a runner or walker is going to pivot and turn. It gives people with dogs a chance to reel in the leash so it doesn't dash across the path in front of you.

Oh, also, it's common f'ing courtesy.

And nothing pisses me off more than a cyclist coming in the opposite direction that does not slow down, and wait for oncoming walkers/runners/cyclists to pass before going around someone in front of them. Heaven forbid you break your cadence or slow down for that extra 4 seconds! No, instead they squeeze dangerously between parties at a wooshing 16mph without giving a ****. These are the people that give cyclists a bad name. Don't be that guy.

Not everyone will hear you. Runners usually have headphones. Some moron stupid terrible awful dip**** cyclists will also wear headphones. But you still announce. Sometimes if I know they don't hear me, when I get really close I say on your left again, louder. Then they usually do. And it begs the question - why wouldn't you? It takes no extra time, and literally no effort to be safe.

So, yes, always announce when you're passing.
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Old 12-01-16, 09:23 AM   #13
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I agree with @Ty0604 more than "always announce". Unless there is a special reason, such as you're passing on my right side, or basically passing when you really shouldn't, I don't much need nor want a warning.

If he is an experienced rider, holding his line and clearly aware of what's going on, it's clear with plenty of room, I probably won't call out and it doesn't bother that rider any more than it does me. Someone not paying attention, or who seems to be still developing his skills, of course you warn him. In some rare cases where they're downright dangerous, my priority is just get around and away safely and that may or may not involve communicating. It's not always "right" or safest but depends, on a lot of factors.

I know this is "regional", Texas in particular, and there are regional differences. I spent most of my life in West Texas and then Dallas/Ft Worth before moving here so the differences stand out. Jogging in Austin for example, I was impressed that every person would say good morning or some other greeting. Here, you just run by and greetings are sporadic. I don't imagine that it's much different for cyclists.

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Old 12-01-16, 09:33 AM   #14
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My question is why is this on the Texas subforum? Is it because only Texan opinions really matter? If yes, carry on.
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Old 12-01-16, 10:21 AM   #15
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I suppose I didn't want to inconvenience the entire country with my question.
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Old 12-01-16, 12:22 PM   #16
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Not sure if trolling or just the worst opinion ever?



Look, everyone has a different thing they do, but when it comes down to it, the right thing to do, is to always announce. Always. Whether it's verbally, or a bell. Just like how the right thing to do when driving is to always signal a lane change, or a turn with your signal light. No, not everyone does it, but they should.
I ride the MUPs here in HTX almost daily when commuting to work (Terry Hershey), and on weekends through Bush Park, and out on the roads toward Fulshear. Especially on paths with walkers and runners, I cannot tell you how many "thank you!"s and waves I get when I announce I am passing. I do the same thing for cyclists I pass.

The reason? Nothing can cause more danger than someone being surprised you're all of a sudden RIGHT THERE. It may discombobulate a cyclist and cause them to veer and crash. This almost happened to me once. You never know when a runner or walker is going to pivot and turn. It gives people with dogs a chance to reel in the leash so it doesn't dash across the path in front of you.

Oh, also, it's common f'ing courtesy.

And nothing pisses me off more than a cyclist coming in the opposite direction that does not slow down, and wait for oncoming walkers/runners/cyclists to pass before going around someone in front of them. Heaven forbid you break your cadence or slow down for that extra 4 seconds! No, instead they squeeze dangerously between parties at a wooshing 16mph without giving a ****. These are the people that give cyclists a bad name. Don't be that guy.

Not everyone will hear you. Runners usually have headphones. Some moron stupid terrible awful dip**** cyclists will also wear headphones. But you still announce. Sometimes if I know they don't hear me, when I get really close I say on your left again, louder. Then they usually do. And it begs the question - why wouldn't you? It takes no extra time, and literally no effort to be safe.

So, yes, always announce when you're passing.
Not trolling. Just my opinion. What's common courtesy to you isn't common courtesy to others. If you're not paying attention to your surroundings that's your problem, not mine. For example; I usually cruise around 20mph on my unloaded bike. If you're going 10mph then you'll see me gaining ground on you pretty quick. Common sense says I'll be passing you. If you don't see me you're not paying attention. As for runners waiting to pass? We have way too many of them to wait for here. There needs to be a minimum speed limit on bike paths. Slowing down and breaking cadence because other people around you aren't paying attention is a huge inconvenience to me. I wear headphones but only one earbud at a time.

So you do what you need to do but don't rip others on a completely opinionated subject.

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I agree with @Ty0604 more than "always announce". Unless there is a special reason, such as you're passing on my right side, or basically passing when you really shouldn't, I don't much need nor want a warning.

If he is an experienced rider, holding his line and clearly aware of what's going on, it's clear with plenty of room, I probably won't call out and it doesn't bother that rider any more than it does me. Someone not paying attention, or who seems to be still developing his skills, of course you warn him. In some rare cases where they're downright dangerous, my priority is just get around and away safely and that may or may not involve communicating. It's not always "right" or safest but depends, on a lot of factors.

I know this is "regional", Texas in particular, and there are regional differences. I spent most of my life in West Texas and then Dallas/Ft Worth before moving here so the differences stand out. Jogging in Austin for example, I was impressed that every person would say good morning or some other greeting. Here, you just run by and greetings are sporadic. I don't imagine that it's much different for cyclists.
Yeah, I commute a lot. About 30 miles round trip. I live in a Portland suburb and commuted here and in Seattle. Even though it's in the regional forum it's a good question to ask anywhere.
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Old 12-01-16, 12:26 PM   #17
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On my main commuters I have passive (Noah, jingle, old cat collars) and an active bell such as Crane type that help on MUP's and bicycle facilities. I often greet or am greeted by fellow cyclists and pedestrians as I pass through. Many of them I know or recognize, particularly in the south central zone of Austin. Occasionally even auto drivers.

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Old 12-01-16, 12:34 PM   #18
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I announce if/when there is a possibility that a collision could occur. On a MUP, that possibility is almost always there because it's usually not very wide. (When there is plenty of passing space, I don't bother.) I usually say "On your left," and that is what most people do where I live. I live in Vermont but that seems to be rule any where I've ridden in New England. I rode in Ohio a couple of summers ago and it was common there too. Most people are trained to walk or ride on the right side of the lane and naturally go right when they hear "on your left."
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Old 12-01-16, 12:41 PM   #19
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Not trolling. Just my opinion. What's common courtesy to you isn't common courtesy to others. If you're not paying attention to your surroundings that's your problem, not mine. For example; I usually cruise around 20mph on my unloaded bike. If you're going 10mph then you'll see me gaining ground on you pretty quick. Common sense says I'll be passing you. If you don't see me you're not paying attention. As for runners waiting to pass? We have way too many of them to wait for here. There needs to be a minimum speed limit on bike paths. Slowing down and breaking cadence because other people around you aren't paying attention is a huge inconvenience to me. I wear headphones but only one earbud at a time.

So you do what you need to do but don't rip others on a completely opinionated subject.



Yeah, I commute a lot. About 30 miles round trip. I live in a Portland suburb and commuted here and in Seattle. Even though it's in the regional forum it's a good question to ask anywhere.

Ty0604,


I commute 25 miles round trip. Converted my first bike to a commuter. an old steel mtb. With all my gear and no wind in my face I am moving close to 15 mph, i'm not killing myself but I am putting in effort. There are a lot of cyclists out on that trail moving at the 20 mph range so I am overtaken pretty often on the ride. I don't have a mirror on my helmet or on my bike and you can make the argument that perhaps I should but one thing I am not doing is looking over my shoulder every 3 minutes to see if someone is behind me and with the wind in my ears I usually don't hear unless I am given a warning. I can tell you that if you blow by me you will startle me. That is not a matter of opinion. It is a matter of common courtesy and what is a common courtesy is not an opinion. That is a factual statement. So if you KNOW that and you still chose not to do it then you are an intentionally inconsiderate rider. Also if you go in between people so you don't have to inconvenienced I hope you are the one that ends up in the hospital.
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Old 12-01-16, 12:43 PM   #20
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BTW I posted this under General Cycling Discussion and no comments so far.
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Old 12-01-16, 12:53 PM   #21
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Ty0604,


I commute 25 miles round trip. Converted my first bike to a commuter. an old steel mtb. With all my gear and no wind in my face I am moving close to 15 mph, i'm not killing myself but I am putting in effort. There are a lot of cyclists out on that trail moving at the 20 mph range so I am overtaken pretty often on the ride. I don't have a mirror on my helmet or on my bike and you can make the argument that perhaps I should but one thing I am not doing is looking over my shoulder every 3 minutes to see if someone is behind me and with the wind in my ears I usually don't hear unless I am given a warning. I can tell you that if you blow by me you will startle me. That is not a matter of opinion. It is a matter of common courtesy and what is a common courtesy is not an opinion. That is a factual statement. So if you KNOW that and you still chose not to do it then you are an intentionally inconsiderate rider. Also if you go in between people so you don't have to inconvenienced I hope you are the one that ends up in the hospital.
Yeah, you should. If I startle someone like you when passing that's your fault for not being aware of your surroundings. Where I live it's illegal not to have a mirror if riding on bike paths. Those without mirrors are restricted to the sidewalks.

Common courtesy is a matter of opinion actually. Some people tip, some don't. Some people hold the door open, some don't. Couldn't careless who does what.
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Old 12-01-16, 01:06 PM   #22
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Yeah, you should. If I startle someone like you when passing that's your fault for not being aware of your surroundings. Where I live it's illegal not to have a mirror if riding on bike paths. Those without mirrors are restricted to the sidewalks.

Common courtesy is a matter of opinion actually. Some people tip, some don't. Some people hold the door open, some don't. Couldn't careless who does what.


Where I live it is illegal to ride on sidewalks in the city and pretty much only self centered a**holes don't tip.


etiquette

1. (Sociology) the customs or rules governing behaviour regarded as correct or acceptable in social or official life
2. (Sociology) a conventional but unwritten code of practice followed by members of any of certain professions or groups

So actually it is not a matter of opinion. If you fail to follow common courtesy you are intentionally being self centered because as you say you "couldn't care less".
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Old 12-01-16, 01:20 PM   #23
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Where I live it is illegal to ride on sidewalks in the city and pretty much only self centered a**holes don't tip.


etiquette

1. (Sociology) the customs or rules governing behaviour regarded as correct or acceptable in social or official life
2. (Sociology) a conventional but unwritten code of practice followed by members of any of certain professions or groups

So actually it is not a matter of opinion. If you fail to follow common courtesy you are intentionally being self centered because as you say you "couldn't care less".
It's still a matter of opinion. What one person finds "correct" or "acceptable" others don't.

I don't tip because it's not my job to pay someone else's wages. Luckily most places here have stopped adding tip lines to the bill. I'm not self centered though by any means. I've worked in a restaurant and refused tips. If an employer can't afford to pay their employees a living wage they should close down.

Just as common courtesy goes, tipping is also an opinion. However, that's getting too far off topic.

It's illegal to ride on the sidewalks here too unless you're under a certain age (16 I think?) and your bike doesn't meet the road requirements (mirror, lights etc!)

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Old 12-01-16, 01:37 PM   #24
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Curious, "I don't tip because it's not my job to pay someone else's wages." Does this go for everywhere? Even when you travel to places that don't pay higher waiter wages?
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Old 12-01-16, 04:31 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ty0604 View Post
Not trolling. Just my opinion. What's common courtesy to you isn't common courtesy to others. If you're not paying attention to your surroundings that's your problem, not mine. For example; I usually cruise around 20mph on my unloaded bike. If you're going 10mph then you'll see me gaining ground on you pretty quick. Common sense says I'll be passing you. If you don't see me you're not paying attention. As for runners waiting to pass? We have way too many of them to wait for here. There needs to be a minimum speed limit on bike paths. Slowing down and breaking cadence because other people around you aren't paying attention is a huge inconvenience to me. I wear headphones but only one earbud at a time.
Dude.
I'm fully aware of what's ahead of me and to the side of me on an MUP, because that's where the possible issues come from - not from behind. No, I can't see you gaining on my because I don't have eyes in the back of my head - no matter how many times I told my class of 5th graders I did. It's your responsibility to announce your presence. Even if someone has a mirror, they may not always be looking in it.

And the very nature of an MUP means there will be multiple users in different modes. You're being incredibly self-centered about your presence there.

It's not a matter of paying attention - runners and walkers also do not have eyes in the back of their heads - should they also be carrying mirrors with them? And people coming toward you are absolutely paying attention by the very nature of their relative position, but you, as the passer from the opposite direction, have the responsibility to wait to pass traffic in front of you when there is oncoming traffic. Just like you would in a car - i mean, you wouldn't pull into the lane of oncoming traffic to pass someone going slow if there was a car coming at you in the other lane, would you?
You said this is a huge inconvenience to you. You are the outlier here. You are the one being dangerous.

Quote:
Originally Posted by practical View Post
I usually say "On your left," and that is what most people do where I live. I live in Vermont but that seems to be rule any where I've ridden in New England. I rode in Ohio a couple of summers ago and it was common there too. Most people are trained to walk or ride on the right side of the lane and naturally go right when they hear "on your left."
Yeah I think it's pretty universal. I've also never had people move to the left. Ever.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ty0604 View Post
Yeah, you should. If I startle someone like you when passing that's your fault for not being aware of your surroundings. Where I live it's illegal not to have a mirror if riding on bike paths. Those without mirrors are restricted to the sidewalks.
Do you have a link to these laws? That sounds pretty weird, and I'd love to compare them to my city's.
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