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Forbes contributor gets it!

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Forbes contributor gets it!

Old 10-19-18, 07:35 AM
  #1  
PatrickGSR94
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Forbes contributor gets it!

I don't necessarily agree with everything in the article, but for the most part it's pretty spot on. I use the full lane for my safety, period. Motorist convenience comes second. I try to accommodate motorist safe passing as much as possible, but I will not risk my own safety to do so.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/carlton.../#547141e924f8
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Old 10-19-18, 08:28 AM
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johnny99
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What do you disagree with?
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Old 10-22-18, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by johnny99 View Post
What do you disagree with?
The statement about 99 out of 100 cyclists "tucking back in" i.e. moving back to the edge, to allow motorists to pass. While the statement itself may be true as most cyclists probably do that, I do not agree with riding in that manner. If the lane is too narrow to share, it's too narrow to share, and cyclists shouldn't be weaving back and forth between an edge position and primary position. I keep primary position by default, and hold a straight line, UNLESS the lane widens and I can safely move farther right to allow cars to pass in the same lane, or a wide shoulder opens up or whatever. Otherwise if the lane is narrow motorists must change lanes to pass.
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Old 10-22-18, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by PatrickGSR94 View Post
The statement about 99 out of 100 cyclists "tucking back in" i.e. moving back to the edge, to allow motorists to pass. While the statement itself may be true as most cyclists probably do that, ..... .
You need to learn the difference between a fact and an opinion.
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Old 10-23-18, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
You need to learn the difference between a fact and an opinion.
I'm well aware, thanks. I don't agree with the opinion stated, as it implies that's what cyclists SHOULD be doing.
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Old 10-23-18, 02:29 PM
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Umm ... no. it states, and you admit, that "tucking back in" is what 99 percent of cyclists Are doing. That is the :"fact" and you even attest to it.

it is Your Opinion that they should not be doing that. that's the opinion.
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Old 10-23-18, 03:55 PM
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Originally Posted by PatrickGSR94 View Post
The statement about 99 out of 100 cyclists "tucking back in" i.e. moving back to the edge, to allow motorists to pass. While the statement itself may be true as most cyclists probably do that, I do not agree with riding in that manner. If the lane is too narrow to share, it's too narrow to share, and cyclists shouldn't be weaving back and forth between an edge position and primary position. I keep primary position by default, and hold a straight line, UNLESS the lane widens and I can safely move farther right to allow cars to pass in the same lane, or a wide shoulder opens up or whatever. Otherwise if the lane is narrow motorists must change lanes to pass.
i have, by my estimation, about 75,000 cycling miles, including many years of cycle commuting, where this topic would be mostly applicable. saying that, i completely agree with this post regarding cyclists' riding protocol; first and foremost, be predictable by staying in the lane, holding the line, and moving to the right where road and traffic conditions warrant. this guy gets it.
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Old 10-23-18, 03:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Umm ... no. it states, and you admit, that "tucking back in" is what 99 percent of cyclists Are doing. That is the :"fact" and you even attest to it.

it is Your Opinion that they should not be doing that. that's the opinion.
do you have anything useful to add to the topic, or are you just going to vomit nonsense, post after post ?

what do you say you do something useful ? as in, get a job.
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Old 10-23-18, 04:02 PM
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Nice article, well written without hype.
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Old 10-25-18, 11:32 AM
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Originally Posted by adablduya View Post
i have, by my estimation, about 75,000 cycling miles, including many years of cycle commuting, where this topic would be mostly applicable. saying that, i completely agree with this post regarding cyclists' riding protocol; first and foremost, be predictable by staying in the lane, holding the line, and moving to the right where road and traffic conditions warrant. this guy gets it.

I find I eliminate about 90% of the "get off the road" jackassery by signaling the shift before I take the lane. It's part of the predictability you mention--makes it clear I'm not just randomly swinging to the left unthinkingly and gives the driver a little warning.
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Old 10-29-18, 12:47 PM
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I personally never occupy the lane. I always ride to the right "tire track". Occupying the lane seems like it is safer but I do not believe that is so.
If a person can't see you or is trying to hit you, riding the middle of the lane increases your odds of getting hit. And if you are concerned about irritating motorists, riding the middle of the lane below the posted speed limit just about guarantees you will irritate them.

Yes, you may get buzzed more often riding in the right but I can handle getting buzzed, getting hit not so much.
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Old 10-29-18, 01:47 PM
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Originally Posted by joemissler View Post
I personally never occupy the lane. I always ride to the right "tire track". Occupying the lane seems like it is safer but I do not believe that is so.
If a person can't see you or is trying to hit you, riding the middle of the lane increases your odds of getting hit. And if you are concerned about irritating motorists, riding the middle of the lane below the posted speed limit just about guarantees you will irritate them.

Yes, you may get buzzed more often riding in the right but I can handle getting buzzed, getting hit not so much.
Never? You don't even take the lane when there's a right turn lane and you're going straight? That's insane.

The whole point is to take the lane when the car is far enough back to see you're doing it and to slow down accordingly. If you're in the middle of the lane, they can't help but see you. If there's no shoulder or a right turn lane, you're not doing them any favor by hanging out in a blind spot waiting to get hit. I'll bail back to the right as soon as it's safe, but I've gotten pretty adamant about taking the lane after getting hit by a right hook.
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Old 10-30-18, 12:51 PM
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Originally Posted by joemissler View Post
I personally never occupy the lane. I always ride to the right "tire track". Occupying the lane seems like it is safer but I do not believe that is so.
If a person can't see you or is trying to hit you, riding the middle of the lane increases your odds of getting hit. And if you are concerned about irritating motorists, riding the middle of the lane below the posted speed limit just about guarantees you will irritate them.

Yes, you may get buzzed more often riding in the right but I can handle getting buzzed, getting hit not so much.
That's the thing. You're more visible the farther left you are, and closer to the motorist's direct line of sight.

I don't know where you are but I've noticed when I control the lane by default and COMMUNICATE with motorists behind me (if there's no obvious passing lane), they're actually appreciative when they pass and I give them a wave thanks for making a safe pass. And by communicate I mean hand signals to indicate whether or not it's safe to pass at that time, which generally requires a mirror for rearward awareness of when a motorist is approaching.
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