Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Rust

Old 03-14-16, 04:32 PM
  #1  
lineinthewater
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 936
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rust

What is your response to rust on components? I keep my bike impeccably clean (aka anal), don't ride in wet conditions, and store indoors, so it's rarely an issue for me. But, sometimes I work on friends' bikes, and see rust invading components. Most of the time, it's not in an easy place to sand it off, and put something over the top to avoid it coming back. Do you guys tolerate rust, especially on low end components, or do you recommend replacement? I don't know, maybe I have to lower my standards and abandon the zero tolerance (at least on bikes that aren't my own). 1st world problem?
lineinthewater is offline  
Old 03-14-16, 04:44 PM
  #2  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,322 Times in 832 Posts
Iron + oxygen = rust Chromed Plated steel can be substituted for Stainless If you ride in the wet and are really Anal


dry the water off after every Ride

But if the component companies s make their proprietary parts in CP steel all you can do is like Paint over

with paint , or clear lacquer , nail polish etc.


I like Black Anodized over Polished aluminum too for the anodizing is an anti corrosion treatment.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 03-14-16, 04:46 PM
  #3  
HillRider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 32,906

Bikes: '96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '20 Surly Midnight Special, All are 3x10. It is hilly around here!

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1688 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 565 Times in 418 Posts
Originally Posted by lineinthewater View Post
I don't know, maybe I have to lower my standards and abandon the zero tolerance (at least on bikes that aren't my own). 1st world problem?
If the bikes aren't yours, your lack of tolerance for rust is a non-issue. You can have enough problems just with your own stuff.
HillRider is offline  
Old 03-14-16, 04:48 PM
  #4  
Andy_K 
Senior Member
 
Andy_K's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 13,222

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 393 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2308 Post(s)
Liked 1,029 Times in 519 Posts
I ride my bike in the rain a lot and don't really do anything special to clean and dry it at the end of the day -- I just hang it up. I do, however, keep the moving parts lubricated. Pretty much the only place I see rust creeping in is on the bolts that hold my rack and fenders on and the water bottle bolts. I pretty much tolerate it there, though I do remove them once in a while and grease the threads.

If I hang a bike up with a wet chain and don't ride it for a few months, some surface rust will often show up there. This happens, for instance, if I forget to lube the chain after washing it. In this case, a fresh application of oil is usually enough to get rid of the visible rust. The chain life is probably shortened, but I don't replace it just because I saw rust. I wait for it to be worn.
__________________
My Bikes
Andy_K is offline  
Old 03-14-16, 05:16 PM
  #5  
SkyDog75
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 3,794

Bikes: Bianchi San Mateo and a few others

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 633 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by lineinthewater View Post
sometimes I work on friends' bikes, and see rust invading components... Do you guys tolerate rust, especially on low end components, or do you recommend replacement?
Not my bike, not my problem. ;-)

Seriously, though, on someone else's bike, I'm not going do anything about it unless it presents a functional problem. I might point it out and offer an opinion about how they might need to address the issue if/when it becomes a problem, but that's it.

My own bikes, on the other hand... Regular maintenance helps me minimize rust and a jug of Evapo-Rust helps me get rid of it when it crops up -- typically on small steel parts like stem bolts & chainring bolts.
SkyDog75 is offline  
Old 03-14-16, 05:18 PM
  #6  
lineinthewater
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 936
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
Not my bike, not my problem. ;-)

Seriously, though, on someone else's bike, I'm not going do anything about it unless it presents a functional problem. I might point it out and offer an opinion about how they might need to address the issue if/when it becomes a problem, but that's it.

My own bikes, on the other hand... Regular maintenance helps me minimize rust and a jug of Evapo-Rust helps me get rid of it when it crops up -- typically on small steel parts like stem bolts & chainring bolts.
What is this magic potion you discuss? "Evapo-Rust"?
lineinthewater is offline  
Old 03-14-16, 07:55 PM
  #7  
SkyDog75
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 3,794

Bikes: Bianchi San Mateo and a few others

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 633 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by lineinthewater View Post
What is this magic potion you discuss? "Evapo-Rust"?
Evapo-Rust Web Site

It's a rust removal product. Immerse rusty parts in Evapo-Rust for a few hours or overnight and the rust is dissolved into the solution. The stuff works really well. It's available at a number of retailers, including Advance Auto Parts, O'Reilly, and Harbor Freight Tool. The down side is that it's not super cheap -- about $25 per gallon if I remember correctly. It's reusable, though, so you can make that gallon go a long way.

Oxalic acid is another thing you can use similarly. Immerse the rusty item and the rust just dissolves. Oxalic acid is often sold as "wood bleach" at hardware stores. It's a lot cheaper than Evapo-Rust, so it makes sense to use it for big items. An eight-buck tub of oxalic acid crystals mixed with a kiddie pool full of water makes a great rust removal bath for bike frames. It's just as effective, too, but maybe not quite as convenient since you have to mix it (just add water). Also, oxalic acid can remove black oxide finishes that you might find on some bike parts like headset cups and freewheel cogs.

Both of these have been discussed quite a bit, along with other rust removal techniques on Bikeforums, especially in the Classic & Vintage subforum. You could probably Google it and get a ton of results -- just add site:bikeforums.net to your Google query to get results from this site.
SkyDog75 is offline  
Old 03-14-16, 07:57 PM
  #8  
lineinthewater
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 936
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
Evapo-Rust Web Site

It's a rust removal product. Immerse rusty parts in Evapo-Rust for a few hours or overnight and the rust is dissolved into the solution. The stuff works really well. It's available at a number of retailers, including Advance Auto Parts, O'Reilly, and Harbor Freight Tool. The down side is that it's not super cheap -- about $25 per gallon if I remember correctly. It's reusable, though, so you can make that gallon go a long way.

Oxalic acid is another thing you can use similarly. Immerse the rusty item and the rust just dissolves. Oxalic acid is often sold as "wood bleach" at hardware stores. It's a lot cheaper than Evapo-Rust, so it makes sense to use it for big items. An eight-buck tub of oxalic acid crystals mixed with a kiddie pool full of water makes a great rust removal bath for bike frames. It's just as effective, too, but maybe not quite as convenient since you have to mix it (just add water). Also, oxalic acid can remove black oxide finishes that you might find on some bike parts like headset cups and freewheel cogs.

Both of these have been discussed quite a bit, along with other rust removal techniques on Bikeforums, especially in the Classic & Vintage subforum. You could probably Google it and get a ton of results -- just add site:bikeforums.net to your Google query to get results from this site.
"An eight-buck tub of oxalic acid crystals mixed with a kiddie pool full of water makes a great rust removal bath for bike frames" LMAO. Makes me thing of Breaking Bad for some reason. No seriously, thanks for all the details. Good info.
lineinthewater is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
bark_eater
Classic & Vintage
1
09-16-19 08:24 AM
mathand1
Bicycle Mechanics
10
08-06-12 11:37 AM
2005trek1200
Classic & Vintage
13
09-07-11 04:59 PM
vins0010
Bicycle Mechanics
1
11-23-10 03:38 AM
dougmc
Bicycle Mechanics
6
11-09-10 09:15 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.