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New rims

Old 03-16-16, 07:48 AM
  #1  
oddurgf
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New rims

Hi Guys,

I am new here and I have a small problem. My girlfriends bike got stolen but luckily we found it again but the rims had been totally damaged (See pictures) the hubs and everything else is still in good shape.

My question is,

Is it possible to buy just new rims without hubs and just remove the hubs from the old rims to the new ones?

These are sturmey archer hubs and Van Schothorst rims.

I hope you can help me with this one.

Best regards,
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Old 03-16-16, 07:51 AM
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Probably want to replace the spokes as well. But in general, you can build new wheels using your old hubs.
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Old 03-16-16, 08:06 AM
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Yes, before bicycles moved in to the modern disposable age, new rims were routinely built onto the original hubs.

This was especially true where the hubs were relatively expensive. In your case, with an SA hub rebuilding the rear makes great sense, but it might be less expensive to replace a front wheel entirely rather than rebuild it.

Last edited by FBinNY; 03-16-16 at 08:13 AM.
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Old 03-16-16, 09:19 AM
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Agree that relacing new rims and spokes is a good idea. I suspect that the OE rims are steel. Now is the chance to change that and go to AL rims if possible. Generally nicer ride feel and tire retention are the advantages. (The better braking isn't, as you have hub brakes). What size are the rims? Andy.
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Old 03-16-16, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
Probably want to replace the spokes as well. But in general, you can build new wheels using your old hubs.
f

This is true but by time you pay for parts and labor for the build, it may cheaper just to buy new wheels. I actually learned to build wheels myself because I damaged a rim and could not abide throwing away a perfectly good hub. But my LBS would have charged me more for the rebuild than new wheels built using the same components (machine built wheels).
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Old 03-16-16, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by DOS View Post
f

This is true but by time you pay for parts and labor for the build, it may cheaper just to buy new wheels. I actually learned to build wheels myself because I damaged a rim and could not abide throwing away a perfectly good hub. But my LBS would have charged me more for the rebuild than new wheels built using the same components (machine built wheels).
+1 not sure exact spec on you wheel but guessing 26 x 1 3/8
coaster $40 Weinmann Zac20 Touring Rear Wheel - 26" x 1-3/8, KT Coaster Hub 14mm, 36H, Silver

3 spd $85 Wheel Master Rear Bicycle Wheel 26 x 1 3/8 36H, Steel Bolt On, Silver, Sturmey 3SP Hub

front $30 Wheel Master Front Bicycle Wheel 26 x 1 3/8 36H, Steel, Bolt On, Silver
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Old 03-16-16, 02:35 PM
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I think that may be a drum brake on the rear, which would be hard to source "new", although they do show up at the bike co-ops and other bike recyclers from time to time.

It would be an opportunity to change to rim brakes or coaster brakes if you wish.

Before you invest too much money in the wheels, carefully inspect the frame and the rest of the bike for damage. If the bike got run into/over by a car, there could be significant damage beyond just the wheels.

Anybody can learn to build a set of wheels, even with some pretty crude equipment. It just takes a little time and patience for the first set. As others mentioned, I'd expect to re-use the hubs, but get a new rim and new spokes. Your new rim may be a slightly different size/design, and even the intact old spokes may be over-stressed.

If you have a local bike co-op, they might be able to get you pointed in the right direction for your build, and may even help you a bit.
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Old 03-17-16, 01:22 AM
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Looks as if the front wheel has a Sturmey-Archer dyno/drum hub, going to need a custom wheel build.
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Old 03-23-16, 06:25 AM
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Thanks for the replies. Much more work than I expected.

I will look into just buying new wheels.
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Old 03-23-16, 06:26 AM
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Yes it does. Makes things way to complicated so I will just look into buying new wheels
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Old 03-23-16, 07:38 AM
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But the bike's brakes and lighting take those specific hubs. I would ask around for a good local neighborhood bike store that can build your wheels with existing hubs and new spokes/rims. It's not a difficult job for a good shop.
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Old 03-23-16, 09:11 AM
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Just thought of this detail. Spoke elbows need good support from the hub flange to not unbend during the tensioning and later riding. Most AL flanged hubs have flanges which are both thick enough to contact the vast majority of the elbow as well as be soft enough so some elbow induced indenting happens (which further gives the spoke elbow a large contact surface).

Steel hub flanges (as most older SA hubs have) don't have these two aspects. So spokes tend to have a small point contact with the flange hole and then the elbow tends to stretch straight. This increases the fatigue and reduces the life of spokes.

So if these SA drum rake hubs are to be reused the builder might want to add spoke washers to better support the spoke elbows. Attached is a photo of such a SA with added spoke washers build. Andy
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Old 03-23-16, 09:55 AM
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If You are lacking wheel building skills and tools Your local bike shop can replace the rim and re-spoke tension and true the wheel for you.

Now You in consultation with LBS Can Choose what rim you get.. Try to not get hit in traffic next time.
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