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A Grease question

Old 03-08-19, 12:09 PM
  #26  
AnkleWork
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Originally Posted by venturi95 View Post
. . .
It's Shimano grease that rules them all.
And you know that because you've tested them all, right?
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Old 05-03-19, 05:59 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by AnkleWork View Post
And you know that because you've tested them all, right?
I have. Except for Shimano's grease, I've put EVERYthing known to man in a set of hubs or bottom bracket and still to date have never replicated the smoothness from Campy's ORIGINAL grease that my brother used to bring home liberally from Continental Bike shop where he worked (I worked at another shop that didn't have that much high end stuff). And no, the NB52 that Kluber puts out is not identical to the original Campy grease. It's close but NB52's pure white and my Campy grease was tan. I just got a tube of this Kluber stuff for an old Campy hub repack that's coming up here. I'll tell ya if this stuff makes em spin like a set of brand new Record hubs or not.

As a side note some of the things I've used to pack hubs and bottom brackets were the thick green/blue "waterproof" (bullcrap, NO grease I have ever used was truly waterproof. I work on cars a lot and experiment with grease on cars as well) marine grease, the cheap light green garbage Autozone "waterproof green grease", Honda's silicone grease, Toyotas silicone grease, Sil-Glyde, white lithium, Phil Grease, Phil oil, Lubiplate's stuff, Mobil 1 oil, Redline's synthetic 75/90, etc etc. With all that said, nothing spun as long as light weight machine oil in the hubs, lol. Granted the lubrication was probably insufficient, but for short trips who knows. I tried that as that was the rumor racers used to talk about in the 70's and early 80's. As a kid I used to hang out with the race crown and over heard this stuff. Who knows if it ever reduced enough drag over time but I tried it lol. As far as overall smoothness for non sealed hubs, the OEM Campy grease was the smoothest I've ever felt in my life.

(I do understand that overall smoothness isn't even a function of lubrication at all, as it is the relationship of the bearings and races; in terms of total bearing roundness, smoothness of the races, either side's race being absolutely parallel to each other, cones being completely round, cone holes being bored and threaded completely concentric etc etc. but speaking in lubrication properties only is where I'm expressing an opinion.)
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Old 05-04-19, 04:05 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Bikesplendor View Post
A meaningful difference, for some, is the longevity of the grease. Polyurea greases last substantially longer than most. They are recommended for applications in which service intervals are long or irregular. Most other greases age, degrade, harden, while the polyurea greases remain sound.

Lucas polyurea grease can be found in the auto section at WM, and elsewhere, in grease gun cartridges, for peanuts. It's often used on farm machinery, and is a favorite among farmers. Their requirements and conditions of use tend to be much more demanding than cyclists'. So I'm fine with that grease.
+1 on the Lucas grease, I use it too, most people seem to think that synthetic grease is an expensive habit for elitists but you can get Lucas X-Tra Heavy Duty grease for peanuts. It has a really good consistency and it doesn't degrade the way regular grease does.

Kret
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Old 05-04-19, 05:21 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Bikesplendor View Post
A meaningful difference, for some, is the longevity of the grease. Polyurea greases last substantially longer than most. They are recommended for applications in which service intervals are long or irregular. Most other greases age, degrade, harden, while the polyurea greases remain sound.

Lucas polyurea grease can be found in the auto section at WM, and elsewhere, in grease gun cartridges, for peanuts. It's often used on farm machinery, and is a favorite among farmers. Their requirements and conditions of use tend to be much more demanding than cyclists'. So I'm fine with that grease.
Water and, primarily, dirt intrusion is the nemesis of most bicycle bearings. So in those terms, a grease being long lasting doesn't make much of a difference past a year, or two (depending on riding conditions and mileage).
Based on my experience, general auto store lithium complex grease is more than good enough in terms of water washout resistance, durability (not drying out) and lubricating performance.

Another thing to consider with polyurea is that it's not very compatible with many other grease types. Which means that if one doesn't wipe off the old grease thoroughly (yes, one should, but I prefer having less things to go wrong if all else is practically equal), the two will mix and not work very well (becoming more "liquid", or less resistant to water washout, or something third - depending on the particular incompatible combination). That's another reason I prefer easy to source, relatively cheap lithium based greases (calcium based ones are similar, but as of last 20 years, I'd say lithium is a "no brainer" for general use - including bike bearings).

In a lot more detail:
https://bike.bikegremlin.com/1985/bi...ase-explained/
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Old 05-15-19, 06:50 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Racing Dan View Post
Yes, and the fact most greases are plenty good enough is likely the reason there is so many "best" or "great" greases. Try the same in a jet turbine and Im sure the field of "great" lubricants shrink considerably.
Racing Dan,
I was on a flight from Indy to Austin a few years ago,i in the first week of June, and the passenger list was mostly the engineers from the oil industry, returning to Houston from the Indy 500. What an interesting flight it was for me. Those guys were all over the latest lubricants used in the transmissions of the 9,000 RPM engines. No break down after five hundred miles of tough wear, and it came out looking clean as it went in. Found out through the flight that it was actually synthetic oil and not conventional derived stuff. I switched after that, to the same products from Ashland Oils in KY and have had great success in my personal vehicles. Each getting over 250 K before any signs of wear.
I suspect that the same is going to be true going forward with grease formulas. I am currently using a mix of high speed Ashland grease with a bit of Lucas Oil white lithium which has the hue of the Shimano grease. Light weight and with similar viscosity as the Campy grease. For now I have not had any failures in hubs BB's, or headsets, and the pedals tested have held up well.
This is all for conventional bearings. The new ceramic bearings are a dog of a different color. They need no lubrication, and will work in water, or dry conditions. Only problem is space age materials cost a lot. $3 per bearing in a pedal set that takes 50 bearing drive up the cost considerably. Maybe there will someday be a thread called "to grease or not to grease". Smiles, MH
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