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Wheel building book.

Old 06-03-19, 04:44 PM
  #1  
Russ498
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Wheel building book.

Iím looking for recommendations for a good book on wheel building and maintenance. I donít care if it covers all maintenance as long it has a comprehensive section on wheels. Many thanks
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Old 06-03-19, 04:59 PM
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The classic in the field is Jobst Brandt's "The Bicycle Wheel", first published in 1981. I believe it it out of print but easily available through used book sellers and Amazon.

This is a highly detailed and theoretical treatment of bicycle wheel design and function. Some of his claims are a bit controversial but still very thought provoking. There is a lot of practical, hands-on info also.

The book is obviously dated and, of course, says nothing about carbon rims and other material and design changes since it was written. Still, well worth the time.
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Old 06-03-19, 05:19 PM
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I started here-
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html

I bought Brandt's book, but had trouble wrapping my brain around some parts.
OTH, I have mild Asperger's, but I thought that would help wrap my....

How do you define "maintenance"?
If you are talking hubs/bearings, just Google "bicycle hub maintenance".
It's not the same as "wheel building".
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Old 06-03-19, 06:55 PM
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I have never used anything other than the few pages dedicated to wheel building in Effective Cycling.
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Old 06-03-19, 10:17 PM
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Plus one on Brandt's book. Also, Sheldon Browne has an excellent how-to at his site. I just rebuilt my rear wheel after 30-plus years. Couldn't find my copy of the book but the on-line info from Browne got me through it with flying colors!
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Old 06-04-19, 05:52 AM
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This is the book I learned (and am still learning) from - Most excellent, for a $12 download :

https://www.wheelpro.co.uk/wheelbuilding/book.php

Musson's book covers everything, in an easily understood fashion - I actually printed it out, and keep it in a ring binder on my workbench
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Old 06-04-19, 09:14 AM
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On my bookshelf is "building bicycle wheels" by Robert Wright, copyright 1977, cost: $ 1.95 BITD..
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Old 06-04-19, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
The classic in the field is Jobst Brandt's "The Bicycle Wheel", first published in 1981. I believe it it out of print but easily available through used book sellers and Amazon.

This is a highly detailed and theoretical treatment of bicycle wheel design and function. Some of his claims are a bit controversial but still very thought provoking. There is a lot of practical, hands-on info also.

The book is obviously dated and, of course, says nothing about carbon rims and other material and design changes since it was written. Still, well worth the time.
My copy of Jobst's book is well worn. I refer to it on all of my wheel builds. I recommend it highly.
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Old 06-04-19, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by mixteup View Post
Musson's book covers everything, in an easily understood fashion - I actually printed it out, and keep it in a ring binder on my workbench
+1 on Mussonís book. I have both it and Jobst Brandtís, and I found Mussonís more useful as a stepwise set of instructions for how to build a set of wheels. Theyíre both good books and complement each other, but if I had to pick only one to learn how to build wheels, it would be the Mussonís book.
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Old 06-05-19, 04:35 AM
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I went one step further and got an instructional DVD that takes you step by step through the entire process of building a 3 cross rear wheel for a road bike from scratch. It also has information for variations like building for disc brakes or 2x spoke patterns, how to measure for ordering spokes, what tools you need and how to use them etc. The cost was small considering the skills you can learn from a Master Wheel Builder. I have since built several wheels very successfully and have greatly improved my truing skills along the way. Google 'billmouldwheels', if you cant find where to order the DVD, just email him. He has always been happy to answer any questions.
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Old 08-16-20, 05:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Mark_K View Post
And please advise a good book for self-development?
it's called life, can't recommend it highly enough
I've read three books about wheel building, begin with robert wright's as an easy intro, then read jobst brandts' for some theory and musson's for detailed and well explained instructions.
The best advice you will find however is in these forums' brains
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Old 08-16-20, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by hazetguy View Post
this book was strongly recommended to me: ART OF WHEELBUILDING: A BENCH REFERENCE FOR NEOPHYTES, PROS & WHEELAHOLICS, By Gerd Schraner.
the high price of the book has kept me from owning a physical copy. however, if you use your google-fu, you can find a downloadable pdf of it.
I have it on my Smart Cellular Telephone, it is freakin' great and cool to see some of the older tech. I would love a physical copy signed by old Gerdy himself but like you not going to pay money when I have it free on my phone with a few minor errors that are easy enough to correct for when reading (unless maybe you have a different ability that would cause reading issues)
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Old 08-16-20, 07:58 PM
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Brandt's book is pretty excellent. For individual topics, I really like some of the blog posts on https://www.wheelfanatyk.com/blog/ .
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Old 08-16-20, 08:28 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
On my bookshelf is "building bicycle wheels" by Robert Wright, copyright 1977, cost: $ 1.95 BITD..
"Building Bicycle Wheels" is an excellent book for one's first wheel. Robert Wright uses plain English, simple terms and does a good job of demystifying wheelbuilding. He is as straightforward in real life. Also an excellent wheelbuilder. (I say this in present tense. I knew him 40 years ago. He doesn't blow his own horn. I knew from others he built good wheels. Had no idea he'd published a book two years before.)
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Old 08-17-20, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by ted_major View Post
+1 on Mussonís book. I have both it and Jobst Brandtís, and I found Mussonís more useful as a stepwise set of instructions for how to build a set of wheels. Theyíre both good books and complement each other, but if I had to pick only one to learn how to build wheels, it would be the Mussonís book.
Exactly my thoughts.
Mussons to learn what to do and how, Brandt's book to learn/understand why it's done that way.
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Old 08-17-20, 07:32 AM
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Another vote for Musson's book, "Professional Guide to Wheelbuilding". I laid out the dough to buy a legit version of this. More modern than Jobst. Explains some things Jobst doesn't.

Jobst's book is also excellent. I had a hard copy and I think I lent it to my stepfather and he passed away so I can't find my copy.

Schraner's book "The Art of Wheelbuilding" is also very good. A bit idiosyncratic and counter to some modern wheelbuilding thought, though. Still (in 1999) he recommended tying and soldering on some wheels. Even for track bikes I think that this is now a discredited practice.

I do expect that the Secret Guild of Exalted Spoke Solderers to rise up en masse and will converge on my house with torches made from extra-long seat posts to visit their wrath upon me and my heathen untied spokes. Sigh.

Any of these books will teach you a lot. I'd start with Musson. A second (or alternate first) choice would be Jobst. Schraner's book is useful once you have the first two books under your belt. My 2 cents.
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Old 08-17-20, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by WizardOfBoz View Post
Schraner's book "The Art of Wheelbuilding" is also very good. A bit idiosyncratic and counter to some modern wheelbuilding thought, though. Still (in 1999) he recommended tying and soldering on some wheels. Even for track bikes I think that this is now a discredited practice.

I do expect that the Secret Guild of Exalted Spoke Solderers to rise up en masse and will converge on my house with torches made from extra-long seat posts to visit their wrath upon me and my heathen untied spokes. Sigh.
When they arrive you can send them to my house too. In 1981 Brandt's book reported his measurements of tied and soldered wheels showed no significant change in tangential or lateral stability from untied spokes and he pretty much said it was a waste of time.
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Old 08-17-20, 10:41 AM
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J have both the Brandt and Schraener books. I like the spoking method in Gerd's book. For hub maintenance you can use Park's site or the manufacturers.
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Old 08-17-20, 04:09 PM
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Thanks

Thanks for some good suggestions will book a few via the library.
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Old 12-16-20, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
On my bookshelf is "building bicycle wheels" by Robert Wright, copyright 1977, cost: $ 1.95 BITD..
It's a great and affordable book, I also have it for several years. Often in such simple books, you can find a lot of useful information. For example, I used this one as the basis for my college writing. And I used the help of the service that I found on Pick The Writer. And with joint efforts, the result turned out to be excellent, and this is thanks to the valuable information that I took from this book.

Last edited by RufusCombs; 12-29-20 at 05:06 PM.
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