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Park HHP-2 worthwhile?

Old 09-01-20, 06:59 PM
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crankholio
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Park HHP-2 worthwhile?

Looking for a quality headset press tool. Any other options I should consider?
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Old 09-01-20, 07:48 PM
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Bill Kapaun
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You can do a lot with a length of threaded rod, flat washers, nuts & a bit of common sense.
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Old 09-01-20, 08:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
You can do a lot with a length of threaded rod, flat washers, nuts & a bit of common sense.
+1. I've successfully installed several headsets using just this kind of homemade tool. Unless you plan to install numerous headsets and on a regular basis buying a dedicated shop quality tool is probably not justified.

That said, if you really want to spend the money, the Park tool is fine.
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Old 09-01-20, 08:21 PM
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If you are doing paid work then a professional bearing setting tool can pay for it's self in good time. If you just like nice tools then why ask here, get it. Do realize that with any tool there are limitations and mods that future components will challenge you with.

I used Bill's approach for a few decades in the shops I worked. But as cartridge bearings began to take over the high end of components I have invested in specific press tools more and more. Too bad I'm aging out of retail service and costs won't be covered for some of them... Andy
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Old 09-01-20, 11:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
If you are doing paid work then a professional bearing setting tool can pay for it's self in good time. If you just like nice tools then why ask here, get it. Do realize that with any tool there are limitations and mods that future components will challenge you with.

I used Bill's approach for a few decades in the shops I worked. But as cartridge bearings began to take over the high end of components I have invested in specific press tools more and more. Too bad I'm aging out of retail service and costs won't be covered for some of them... Andy
I usually have nothing to add, or "correct" in any of your posts. Here, while I generally agree, just a note, more of a philosophical one:

This is just my opinion/point of view - not claiming it to be "right" - everyone should choose and decide for and by themselves.
Not everything is about money. For me - fixing stuff on my own has always been a preferred way. I inherited a lot of tools from my father, and, if my son shows any interest in fixing stuff - he'll probably get even more tools - and a garage.
Also, I've lived most of my life in economic crisis, scarcity. However, one thing I've never regretted was getting good quality (more expensive) tools. All for DIY tools (both out of interest, and necessity), but if a tool is not good enough, I'd always keep looking for a (more) proper tool. With improper tools, there's always a certain amount of anxiety when doing the work: "will it hold, or slip, will it damage the part(s)" - and similar. With good quality tools, even before you start working, you usually have that nice feeling it will all work as intended and the whole process is more "Zen-like" to put it that way. This comes from a guy capable and experienced in fixing most stuff with the standard "duc tape & WD40" - mostly for not having the means to do otherwise.

So I'd say: if buying a good tool doesn't prevent you from paying the bills, taxes, getting shoes without holes, or even from going to a vacation - definitely go for it. It is worth it, in more than one way.

ParkTool is not available where I live, but Unior Headset press - 1680/4 is quite good, well made, with strong tool steel, and good ergonomy. HHP-2 looks similarly enough and if it's easily available and doesn't cost (a lot) more, I suppose it's also fine (but haven't used it to confirm).
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Old 09-02-20, 12:45 AM
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At the shop I use the Park tool, at home a threaded rod, nuts and big washers. At the shop I am interested in speed, how quickly the job gets done with accuracy and minimal fuss, not so at home. Every time I use the Park tool at the shop I tell myself to get one for my home basement shop, it does the work so much quicker and easier than the DIY method, but I am so darned frugal that I cannot justify the price tag! It is hard being me.
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Old 09-02-20, 12:53 AM
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The HHP-2 is fast to operate and makes sense in a commercial setting. As long as the drifts are the right size you can save money using a simpler press (up to and including threaded rod with washers and nuts) with the correct drifts. The HHP-2 is also pretty darn bulky, so if that's a concern that's something to consider. I'm a pro mechanic, and for my home shop I got the Pedros press, which is kind of a happy medium between the HHP-2 and a simpler, purely threaded press, like the HHP-3.It's really a balance between price, speed, and bulk--you'll get fine results as long as you use legit drifts.
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Old 09-02-20, 05:53 AM
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I had a generic one like this that worked very well. Seems like they used to be more readily available. This one is at Chain Reaction.

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Old 09-02-20, 08:24 AM
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Thanks for all the suggestions. Not sure if I'll get the HHP-2 or not, but it's nice to see other alternatives. I knew about the threaded bolt + washers + nuts method, but I had never heard of the Lifeline or Unior.
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Old 09-02-20, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by crankholio View Post
Thanks for all the suggestions. Not sure if I'll get the HHP-2 or not, but it's nice to see other alternatives. I knew about the threaded bolt + washers + nuts method, but I had never heard of the Lifeline or Unior.
I have the HHP-2 for my home shop and have never regretted having it. Iíve used mine a lot because Iím always changing things including frames. That said, the most important part of the HHP-2 is the stepped cups. You can get them from Park for $18. They would vastly improve the threaded bolt headset press. Just be careful how they press on cartridge bearings.
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Old 09-02-20, 12:33 PM
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Own a (Home) bike shop and do a lot of headset replacements,, & will so for decades to come?
By the way, Chris King headsets have additional pieces for many of the common press tools

https://chrisking.com/collections/he...press-adapters
  • Press adaptors are available for use with Bicycle Research™, Campagnolo™, Hozan™, Park™, Pedro's™, VAR™ and many other headset cup presses.
  • [by way of mentioning other headset oress makers]







...





..

Last edited by fietsbob; 09-02-20 at 12:53 PM.
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Old 09-02-20, 09:49 PM
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I like owning nice bike tools so I purchased the Park Tool HHP-2 press. It has been used three times, so it really hasn't paid for itself when just looking at shop costs but has paid for itself in satisfaction. The Park Tool is not Abbey Tools nice but nice enough to satisfy me. The HHP-3 would work for most people and is less expensive.
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