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Thinking of saving the cassette

Old 11-27-21, 08:42 PM
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ScreamingB
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Thinking of saving the cassette

I was thinking on saving the cassette by installing a brand new exact same KMC chain X9. But i guess it's too late because the bike will slip on the smallest cog while in load. I had 6000 km on them before i installed the new chain. Old chain was about 0.75% stretched before i took it out. Never thought the cassette will wear this soon. Reinstalled old chain and slipping is gone. Have to wait till they wear out completely before i swap them at once.
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Old 11-27-21, 08:47 PM
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Originally Posted by ScreamingB View Post
I was thinking on saving the cassette by installing a brand new exact same KMC chain X9. But i guess it's too late because the bike will slip on the smallest cog while in load. I had 6000 km on them before i installed the new chain. Old chain was about 0.75% stretched before i took it out. Never thought the cassette will wear this soon. Reinstalled old chain and slipping is gone. Have to wait till they wear out completely before i swap them at once.
Do that, and you'll be replacing chainrings, too.
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Old 11-27-21, 09:03 PM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
Do that, and you'll be replacing chainrings, too.
😂.. so you suggest to swap them out ASAP? I'm unsure if the chainring had worn to a point where it needs to be replaced. As of now, shifting is perfect.. I'm afraid if i swap the cassette and chain, then i may have to swap the chainring.
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Old 11-27-21, 09:35 PM
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Waiting until the chain was stretched 0.75% is a bit hard on chainrings but not fatal. I have well over 25,000 miles on my chainrings and they've survived multiple chains and cassettes and still shift perfectly. As to the smallest cog slipping with a new chain, that's to be expected if you use it a lot. It has the smallest radius and the fewest teeth to distribute the wear and it will go "out of spec" first.
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Old 11-27-21, 09:45 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Waiting until the chain was stretched 0.75% is a bit hard on chainrings but not fatal. I have well over 25,000 miles on my chainrings and they've survived multiple chains and cassettes and still shift perfectly. As to the smallest cog slipping with a new chain, that's to be expected if you use it a lot. It has the smallest radius and the fewest teeth to distribute the wear and it will go "out of spec" first.
This got me thinking if it's ok to just swap the smallest cog out since the rest of the cogs are fine. And yes, i used the smallest cog the most.
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Old 11-27-21, 10:49 PM
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Originally Posted by ScreamingB View Post
This got me thinking if it's ok to just swap the smallest cog out since the rest of the cogs are fine. And yes, i used the smallest cog the most.
No surprise, it's what I thought right away. 3700 miles is getting a bit much for a chain in general and if that small cog is used a lot of the time it's a lot for that too.

I have found chain/cog/ring lifespan discussions interesting in how there is such a wide range of claimed experience. So much seems to depend on variables each rider has a mix of. Rider weight/strength. Cadence/cog preferences, terrain, weather, rider's maintenance ability, frequency of maintenance and corrosion substances being mitigated, to name some biggies. I've seen strong tandem teams go through a cog set and chain in under 1000 miles and have serviced bikes with well over 5000 miles on the drivetrain with little cleaning and still "measure" as being close to new.

The guidelines that most will see are based on a bunch of averages and assumptions. As one rides more and begins to pay attention to this stuff one starts to understand where they fall into the range. Or they just continue to react and be frustrated routinely. Andy
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Old 11-28-21, 02:38 PM
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think about the contact area of the chain on say a 14 or 12t cog - maybe there are 6 or 7 teeth engaged. the cog is steel.

an aluminum chainring which is softer material will have many more teeth engaged.

wear accelerates as the chain pins wear, because the load is distributed across fewer teeth, less surface area, more wear.

the longer you run a worn chain, the faster other parts of the driveline will wear. Chains are relatively cheap, it's false economy to postpone replacing them

/markp
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