Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

tire direction

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

tire direction

Old 06-18-23, 03:09 PM
  #76  
Senior Member
 
maddog34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: NW Oregon
Posts: 2,986

Bikes: !982 Trek 930R Custom, Diamondback ascent with SERIOUS updates, Fuji Team Pro CF and a '09 Comencal Meta 5.5

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1301 Post(s)
Liked 744 Times in 538 Posts
Originally Posted by DiabloScott
It's the difference between a belly flop and a vertical dive.



More strawman arguments
look up "friction" next... you'll possibly realize that tire contact and brakes converting motion into heat are the SAME basic principle.
and a skid is just a reverse burnout... both melt rubber into little tiny balls.. AKA: "the marbles". created by heat as a result of FRICTION... you know... the same thing that makes brakes work.
enjoy eating your straw.

oh, and sliding tires across oily pavement is really... are ya sittin' down?.... petro-planing.

now... what makes wet pavement slippery when compared to dry pavement?
a thin layer of water... we know that as HYDROPLANING.... the amount of hydroplaning occurring is all that stands between you and that guardrail on the outside of any corner when the road surface is wet... speed reduces the time that the water has to get out from in between your tires and the pavement's surface.. tread helps speed the removal... directional treads actually create a pumping action as well as channels to facilitate the evacuation of the offending liquid.

Last edited by maddog34; 06-18-23 at 03:16 PM.
maddog34 is offline  
Old 06-18-23, 03:23 PM
  #77  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: San Diego
Posts: 714

Bikes: 1978 Bruce Gordon, 1977 Lippy, 199? Lippy tandem, Bike Friday NWT, 1982 Trek 720, 2012 Rivendell Atlantis, 1983 Bianchi Specialissima?

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 351 Post(s)
Liked 180 Times in 111 Posts
Originally Posted by TC1
You may be interested in the new thread, where that is discussed in more detail -- specifically the fact that NASA's equation proves bicycles can hydroplane.
I suspect many of the people who cite the NASA paper have not actually read the paper. Having actually experienced what I thought was hydroplaning while on a bicycle, I was skeptical of the claims that it is impossible per the NASA study so decided to actually read the study to see if it in fact said this. Most of it was completely over my head but I did note something called partial hydroplaning in the study. OK, so if one wants to split hairs, maybe I was not technically experiencing 100% hydroplaning but maybe it was partial hydroplaning. In any event, it was VERY unnerving. It was a one time event on a fully loaded tandem descending a mountain pass in Canada in the rain. The bike was moving in ways I have never experienced before or since. I yelled at my wife to sit still. She responded that she was. So, no matter what anyone more knowledgeable might say here, I am convinced that I have experienced at least partial hydroplaning that one time, would prefer it never happens again, and believe that the cited NASA paper does NOT prove me wrong. I might add the paper does also mention the liquefying of tire. Anyway, sometimes reality trumps study/theory. In reality, science is just theory. If one wants to claim that it is impossible that I was hydroplaning then I would be curious as to what your theory is on what I was experiencing. Maybe I was just hallucinating?
L134 is offline  
Old 06-18-23, 04:23 PM
  #78  
Senior Member
 
sweeks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 2,577

Bikes: Airborne "Carpe Diem", Motobecane "Mirage", Trek 6000, Strida 2, Dahon "Helios XL", Dahon "Mu XL", Tern "Verge S11i"

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 996 Post(s)
Liked 591 Times in 406 Posts
Originally Posted by L134
In reality, science is just theory.
Well, it's a lot more than that. Science is the best way we have to understand the natural world. It's not perfect, being a human endeavor, but it's self-correcting and, given enough time, leads to better understanding.
In science, the word "theory" means a concept that is so well-supported by evidence that it's generally accepted as "truth"... at least in the scientific community. A theory starts as a "hypothesis", which may be not much more than an observation or educated guess. Then the hypothesis is tested, attempting to show that it's wrong; in other words to "falsify" it. If this happens, the scientist goes back to the drawing board and generates another hypothesis. When the hypothesis has been tested enough by multiple investigators, and becomes useful for making predictions, it attains the status of a theory.
Examples of theories include Germ Theory of Disease, Evolution, Continental Drift. These have stood the test of time and many challenges, but they *could* be falsified... whoever did this would instantly win the Nobel Prize!
sweeks is offline  
Likes For sweeks:
Old 06-18-23, 04:25 PM
  #79  
Expired Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: TN
Posts: 11,820
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3777 Post(s)
Liked 5,737 Times in 2,897 Posts
L134, that does sound frightening regardless of the cause! How did you correct it?
shelbyfv is offline  
Old 06-18-23, 04:44 PM
  #80  
Senior Member
 
squirtdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
Posts: 9,930

Bikes: Kirk Custom JK Special, '84 Team Miyata,(dura ace old school) 80?? SR Semi-Pro 600 Arabesque

Mentioned: 107 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2376 Post(s)
Liked 2,904 Times in 1,583 Posts
Originally Posted by TC1
There is no such animal. When a rubber tire skids across pavement, it liquefies itself and creates the thin layer of liquid which -- as previously explained -- interferes with the rubber-road interface. That's what a skid mark is.


Of all the silliness you have posted this seems to be the most ridiculous.
you can lose traction without causing a skid mark

and losing traction is not hydroplaning in all cases, much less hydroplaning on liquefied rubber
__________________
Life is too short not to ride the best bike you have, as much as you can
(looking for Torpado Super light frame/fork or for Raleigh International frame fork 58cm)



squirtdad is offline  
Likes For squirtdad:
Old 06-18-23, 04:55 PM
  #81  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: San Diego
Posts: 714

Bikes: 1978 Bruce Gordon, 1977 Lippy, 199? Lippy tandem, Bike Friday NWT, 1982 Trek 720, 2012 Rivendell Atlantis, 1983 Bianchi Specialissima?

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 351 Post(s)
Liked 180 Times in 111 Posts
Originally Posted by shelbyfv
L134, that does sound frightening regardless of the cause! How did you correct it?
Long time ago, 1982. What I do recall is that I was terrified, I sensed that I had pretty much no control of the bike (probably not true as we did not crash) and I NEVER told my now ex-wife. I think I probably just managed to gradually slow down, stop, and take a deep breath. BTW, it was not a shimmy. It was more like a floating sensation. This topic has always fascinated me because of the experience and I simply don't buy the argument/theory that it is impossible to hydroplane on a bike, regardless of what any scientist might tell me.. I will also contend that the cited NASA study actually does NOT prove it impossible and therefore I am NOT dissing the scientists and am NOT denying the science.
L134 is offline  
Old 06-18-23, 05:08 PM
  #82  
Senior Member
 
Trakhak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 5,565
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2592 Post(s)
Liked 3,118 Times in 1,773 Posts
Originally Posted by L134
Long time ago, 1982. What I do recall is that I was terrified, I sensed that I had pretty much no control of the bike (probably not true as we did not crash) and I NEVER told my now ex-wife. I think I probably just managed to gradually slow down, stop, and take a deep breath. BTW, it was not a shimmy. It was more like a floating sensation. This topic has always fascinated me because of the experience and I simply don't buy the argument/theory that it is impossible to hydroplane on a bike, regardless of what any scientist might tell me.. I will also contend that the cited NASA study actually does NOT prove it impossible and therefore I am NOT dissing the scientists and am NOT denying the science.
I've had exactly the same experience, although in my case it was on a fine layer of sand. Probably not hydroplaning in your case or mine.
Trakhak is offline  
Old 06-20-23, 10:54 AM
  #83  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 187
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 69 Post(s)
Liked 159 Times in 71 Posts
Well all I know is that there should be a law standardizing the location of the arrow on the sidewalk. Forget all this hydroplaning stuff, let's talk about all the time wasted worldwide looking for the gosh darn arrow (especially for those of us needing reading glasses).
jolly_codger is offline  
Old 06-20-23, 11:29 AM
  #84  
Senior Member
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 12,985

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 131 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4864 Post(s)
Liked 4,013 Times in 2,608 Posts
Originally Posted by sweeks
...
Examples of theories include Germ Theory of Disease, Evolution, Continental Drift. ...
Continental Drift! Right on topic. So those tires have been studied in detail by the non-cycling world. Is the drift more in wet conditions? Did they measure water thickness? Can you extrapolate the results to other tires? And did they study this drift at speeds relevant to cyclists? (The experience of the tandem rider a couple of post up sure sounds like it could be described as "drift". Were those tires Continentals?)

For now, I'll stick to Vittoria tires.
79pmooney is offline  
Likes For 79pmooney:
Old 06-20-23, 11:35 AM
  #85  
Senior Member
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 12,985

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 131 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4864 Post(s)
Liked 4,013 Times in 2,608 Posts
And my other wisecrack comment - I make it a point of seeing to it my tires always rotate so that the tread on top goes forward. I find the bike very difficult to balance when they rotate backwards and even when I can do the balancing act, I go not arrive where I intended to go.
79pmooney is offline  
Likes For 79pmooney:
Old 06-20-23, 04:45 PM
  #86  
Senior Member
 
curbtender's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SF Bay Area, East bay
Posts: 7,736

Bikes: Miyata 618 GT, Marinoni, Kestral 200 2002 Trek 5200, KHS Flite, Koga Miyata, Schwinn Spitfire 5, Mondia Special, Univega Alpina, Miyata team Ti, Santa Cruz Highball

Mentioned: 54 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1628 Post(s)
Liked 2,707 Times in 1,261 Posts
You guys talking about losing your grip? The only time I've had issues on asphalt being wet is when it was painted and on tarred cracks.
curbtender is offline  
Old 06-26-23, 09:14 PM
  #87  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2023
Location: Mascotte, Florida
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
yes we can see it all on you tube and hear it on the web
ElClemente is offline  
Old 06-26-23, 09:17 PM
  #88  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2023
Location: Mascotte, Florida
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by squirtdad
Of all the silliness you have posted this seems to be the most ridiculous.
you can lose traction without causing a skid mark

and losing traction is not hydroplaning in all cases, much less hydroplaning on liquefied rubber
yes I laughed out loud at that, just ride and see for yourself
ElClemente is offline  
Old 06-26-23, 10:56 PM
  #89  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: NE oHIo
Posts: 1,075

Bikes: Specialized, Trek, Diamondback, Schwinn, Peugeot

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 161 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 45 Posts
Amusing

All this chatter and I didnt see much about tire direction.

If you look directly at the tread and see a caret ^ or arrow head in the tread it is directional. When looking at the tire from the back or front the "point" should be facing up. If there is a directional arrow, that will match what I just wrote. It will be the opposite for the front.

HOWEVER many of the better quality tires will have a two sided arrow on the sidewall which will have front and back marked on either side of the arrow. This DOES match what I have described. Another conventional marking is POWER with an arrow that will also match.
The power scenario matches why the tire is mounted rotating one way for the rear and the opposite for the front. Rear has forces transmitted from the chain. Front has the most force from braking.

Got it figured out now?

-SP
speedy25 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.