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Suggest a DURABLE chain tool

Old 04-06-10, 06:04 AM
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Suggest a DURABLE chain tool

Dear all,

I have a Rohloff Revolver chain tool, and am extremely happy with it, especially with its riveting feature.

However, I usually take (or used to take - read on) a cheaper but still good chain tool, with me, on my bikerides or junkyard-scavenging. That tool is no more - it's an ex-tool, since I tried to break a wholly rusted 1/8" chain, with it. The pin bent sideways and since I can't buy spares, the tool is lost. (It may have been user error, but I have replaced so many chains by now, that I doubt)

So my question for you is: from your personal experience, can you please suggest a durable chain tool (other than the Rohloff Revolver, which is great but a bit expensive and overkill)?


Thank you, thank you, thank you.
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Old 04-06-10, 06:08 AM
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Park CT-3
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Old 04-06-10, 06:11 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider
Park CT-3
OK, Hillrider, I know you're experienced. Can you just compare that tool (which I expected to be a popular suggestion) to any other you have used?
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Old 04-06-10, 07:14 AM
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I carry the Park CT-5 and have for a few years. I haver never had an issue with it.
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Old 04-06-10, 09:05 AM
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The CT-5 holds up well even to day-to-day LBS work. That's the one I carry in my toolkits. Make sure to heavily grease the threads on any chain tool you carry, so it doesn't rust while waiting to get used.
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Old 04-06-10, 09:07 AM
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops
Dear all,

I have a Rohloff Revolver chain tool, and am extremely happy with it, especially with its riveting feature.

However, I usually take (or used to take - read on) a cheaper but still good chain tool, with me, on my bikerides or junkyard-scavenging. That tool is no more - it's an ex-tool, since I tried to break a wholly rusted 1/8" chain, with it. The pin bent sideways and since I can't buy spares, the tool is lost. (It may have been user error, but I have replaced so many chains by now, that I doubt)

So my question for you is: from your personal experience, can you please suggest a durable chain tool (other than the Rohloff Revolver, which is great but a bit expensive and overkill)?


Thank you, thank you, thank you.
My Gian Robert chain pliers are still going strong after more than 30 years:
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Old 04-06-10, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by mechBgon
The CT-5 holds up well even to day-to-day LBS work. That's the one I carry in my toolkits. Make sure to heavily grease the threads on any chain tool you carry, so it doesn't rust while waiting to get used.
The CT-5 looks nice: it takes the same replaceable pins as the CT-3 (and other Park chaintools) and is indeed small. Disadvantage: cannot create a large enough torque with it, easily.

Is the material (except for the pin, which is the same), better, worse or equal to the one of the CT-3?


Are there any other options, outside of Park?

As for those chain crimpers: I believe they are sturdy, but probably either out of production or out of my current budget. Or both.
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Old 04-06-10, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops
The CT-5 looks nice: it takes the same replaceable pins as the CT-3 (and other Park chaintools) and is indeed small. Disadvantage: cannot create a large enough torque with it, easily.
It requires more effort than a shop-sized chain tool, but it's not THAT difficult, or I wouldn't use one as much as I do. For take-along use, the higher torque required is worth having a tool that's small and just 75 grams, instead of huge and probably 250 grams.

Is the material (except for the pin, which is the same), better, worse or equal to the one of the CT-3?
I'd say it's better. I've never seen a CT-5 with a broken "shelf," but I've seen several CT-3s die that way.
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Old 04-06-10, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops
OK, Hillrider, I know you're experienced. Can you just compare that tool (which I expected to be a popular suggestion) to any other you have used?
The CT-3 has replaceable pins for one. The downside to that tool is that it won't do some of the larger BMX chains. If you're doing 9/10/11 speed only, pickup the CT4.2
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Old 04-06-10, 10:38 AM
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I have the folding Park CT-6. They don't make them anymore, but I can testify to the quality of Park chain tools.
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Old 04-06-10, 12:05 PM
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Originally Posted by mechBgon
I'd say it's better. I've never seen a CT-5 with a broken "shelf," but I've seen several CT-3s die that way.
Awesome, thank you!
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Old 04-06-10, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by operator
The CT-3 has replaceable pins for one. The downside to that tool is that it won't do some of the larger BMX chains. If you're doing 9/10/11 speed only, pickup the CT4.2
It's good you mention this!! I find myself replacing 1/8" chains most of the time, lately. Looks like the Park CT-7 is my only viable option?
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Old 04-06-10, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops
OK, Hillrider, I know you're experienced. Can you just compare that tool (which I expected to be a popular suggestion) to any other you have used?
My first chain tool was a Cyclo (isn't everyone's?) and then the Park when I realized the Cyclo was too weak for newer chains. I've had the CT3 for at least 15 years and never saw a reason to replace it with anything else. It works, lasts, is reasonably priced and nothing has ever broken. The spare pin that came with it has been in my parts box for as long as I've had the tool

You could get a Campy chain tool and have it become obsolete every three years or so.
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Old 04-06-10, 03:22 PM
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Just FYI, the tool in question is (was, actually) Super B 3340 "Chain rivet extractor". The counter-nut is made from some really cheap, soft steel, because its recess is totally deformed.

Some pics of the tool as new:
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Old 04-07-10, 02:28 PM
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops
Just FYI, the tool in question is (was, actually) Super B 3340 "Chain rivet extractor". The counter-nut is made from some really cheap, soft steel, because its recess is totally deformed.

Some pics of the tool as new:
What is it with some tool designers? They make a fine looking chaintool like that and then proceeded to slap some cheap *ss steel counter-nut on it. I am just exasperated!
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Old 04-07-10, 02:59 PM
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What's the deal with the counter-nut? What does that do? None of the chain tools I've used have had one of those.
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Old 04-07-10, 03:22 PM
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I've been eying up the Wipperman Chain Tool. It's compact and beefy at the same time (easy fellas). Although the one-sided handle (instead of a "T" shaped handle) might be a killer as far as function goes?

Bottom line, my Park CT-5 works pretty well and won't be replaced until it somehow breaks. New chains, old chains, rusty chains... it works just fine.
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Old 04-07-10, 08:37 PM
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OK guys, I think I will go for either the CT-5 or the CT-3, but this leaves the problem of breaking 1/8" chains. I didn't think about it, because my trusty Rohloff Revolver can do both 1/8" and 3/32" easily.

Any suggestions for a durable chain tool that would (also) work with 1/8" chains?

And thanks operator for reminding me of this "tiny detail".
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Old 04-08-10, 07:14 AM
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops
Any suggestions for a durable chain tool that would (also) work with 1/8" chains?
https://www.pedros.com/tutto.htm
this is, to my knowledge, the only tool that can break all chains. Problem is it's new and nobody can vouch for its durability.
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Old 04-08-10, 07:37 AM
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The Park CT-3 will do any normal 1/8" chain, it's only the ones with very thick plates that you need a different tool for. You're probably not going to find too many of the thick 1/8" or 3/16" chains at the dump, but maybe the trash in Finland is different from the trash around here...

The tool I carry on a ride, if I carry one at all, is the Wippermann, and it's a good one.
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Old 04-08-10, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops
OK guys, I think I will go for either the CT-5 or the CT-3, but this leaves the problem of breaking 1/8" chains. I didn't think about it, because my trusty Rohloff Revolver can do both 1/8" and 3/32" easily.

Any suggestions for a durable chain tool that would (also) work with 1/8" chains?

And thanks operator for reminding me of this "tiny detail".
park CT-7
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Old 04-08-10, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by helicomatic
The Park CT-3 will do any normal 1/8" chain, it's only the ones with very thick plates that you need a different tool for. You're probably not going to find too many of the thick 1/8" or 3/16" chains at the dump, but maybe the trash in Finland is different from the trash around here...

The tool I carry on a ride, if I carry one at all, is the Wippermann, and it's a good one.
Thanks, good to know. I have no interest (for now?) in 3/16" chains. the 1/8" chains are very common, due to the large number of singlespeed or 3-speed bikes present in Finnish junkyards
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Old 04-08-10, 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by ValVal
https://www.pedros.com/tutto.htm
this is, to my knowledge, the only tool that can break all chains. Problem is it's new and nobody can vouch for its durability.
Well, it's not the only one, because as I said, I have the Rohloff Revolver, which can do any chain type, and is probably better quality than the Pedros, while not too much more expensive.
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Old 04-08-10, 08:35 AM
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Originally Posted by ValVal
https://www.pedros.com/tutto.htm
this is, to my knowledge, the only tool that can break all chains. Problem is it's new and nobody can vouch for its durability.
it's Pedros... I like their lube, so I'd be comfortable buying a chain tool from them too.
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Old 04-08-10, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by nahh
it's Pedros... I like their lube, so I'd be comfortable buying a chain tool from them too.
That may be, but I am not going to spend ~$80 on a chain tool that I'm hauling around. Even if I wanted to, the wife would not approve.
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