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Innards of OCLV fork

Old 06-21-10, 06:30 AM
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goatalope
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Innards of OCLV fork

I had an OCLV fork with a bent steerer. Everyone here agreed it was stupid to try to bend it back. So I chopped it up. Kindof interesting. Aluminum runs inside the fork down a couple inches. Then from there on its just carbon. Check out the pictures.
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Old 06-21-10, 08:21 AM
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Interesting that the crown is hollowed-out by drilling holes from underneath..
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Old 06-21-10, 10:36 AM
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Thanks for the pics. I have actually wondered what they looked like inside.
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Old 06-21-10, 03:43 PM
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The forks with aluminum dropouts also have an aluminum lug that extends a few inches up from the dropout.
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Old 06-21-10, 04:20 PM
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No surprise here. Carbon composite construction is poor at dealing with high point loading but when the pressures are spread out performs as promised. Having a U shape to connect to the steeer which would be welded to the U is a great way to spread out the stresses from the high point loading at the steerer tube into the carbon over enough distance that the carbon can easily accept the loading.
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Old 06-21-10, 08:10 PM
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I find it interesting that there's a thin point in the fork wall when the rest of it looks uniform in thickness.

was the thinner side on the inside of the fork?
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Old 06-21-10, 08:21 PM
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Looking closer you can see the other cut off leg to the left in the background. So the thin part is actually on the outside. Happily it's on the middle of the outside and not at the front or rear that takes the most loading.
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Old 06-21-10, 08:55 PM
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Very cool! Thanks for the info.
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Old 06-21-10, 10:57 PM
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I'm surprised that there is that much aluminum. I doubt there is that much in a full aluminum fork. Very cool pictures. I wish more people did that with broken frames, forks etc. Well done!
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Old 06-21-10, 11:03 PM
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what's peculiar is that the aluminum is drilled.

I figured they would cast it instead, guess not.
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