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Weight limit for wheels

Old 11-16-14, 01:53 PM
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Weight limit for wheels

Hi there,

I am looking at buying me some zipp 404, which have a recommended weight limit of 250pounds (113kg)....I myself am 110kg my bikes around 10kg with everything on it.

I have seen afew guys bigger than myself on zipp wheels. Would it be safe to say I can still ride on them? Or do they have to be altered and strengthened somehow?



Cheers
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Old 11-16-14, 02:41 PM
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What did Zipp say when you asked them?
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Old 11-16-14, 02:45 PM
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Zipps website say max "rider weight" is 250 lbs.....
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Old 11-16-14, 02:47 PM
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These wheels are not from a retail store, they are second hand. There is a recommendad weight that I have seen on Zipp weaponry...I joined this forum to ask questions...that's why I'm asking lol.
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Old 11-16-14, 03:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Wanderer
Zipps website say max "rider weight" is 250 lbs.....
sorry to sound stupid...if I'm 240lbs, does this mean I'm able to use them? That weight does not include the bike weight?. Are you able to show me the link to this information please.

I'm getting my hopes up lol
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Old 11-16-14, 03:06 PM
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They specifically list it as rider weight................

https://www.zipp.com/wheels/ pick your wheel, check specs
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Old 11-16-14, 03:18 PM
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Some questioners go to great lengths to avoid answers.
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Old 11-16-14, 03:34 PM
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Based on your question and your weight, I'll venture a guess that you are a fairly new/casual cyclist. If that is correct, you should do a lot of research before you buy someone's used carbon wheels.
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Old 11-16-14, 03:35 PM
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If weight handling is an Issue get a more conventional Wheel with a Lot of spokes.
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Old 11-16-14, 04:01 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob
If weight handling is an Issue get a more conventional Wheel with a Lot of spokes.
I want the best not conventional lol. Thanks for the advice thou
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Old 11-16-14, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv
Based on your question and your weight, I'll venture a guess that you are a fairly new/casual cyclist. If that is correct, you should do a lot of research before you buy someone's used carbon wheels.
Thanks for the advice Shelbyfv...your right about researching second hand wheels. I am sort of leaning toward the extra dollars to get somethig new for afew hundred more dollars.
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Old 11-16-14, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Wanderer
They specifically list it as rider weight................

Wheels | Zipp - Speed Weaponry pick your wheel, check specs
Thank you Wanderer
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Old 11-16-14, 04:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Foilnz
I want the best not conventional lol. Thanks for the advice thou
Are Zipp 404s "the best"?
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Old 11-16-14, 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by AnkleWork
Are Zipp 404s "the best"?
Better than conventional
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Old 11-16-14, 04:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Foilnz
Better than conventional
That's nonsense. Best for what use? Are you road acing? Time trialing? Zip carbon wheels are a specialist's tool and there are far better choices for regular and casual riders.
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Old 11-16-14, 05:06 PM
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I'm guessing again- triathlon??
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Old 11-16-14, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv
I'm guessing again- triathlon??
Yes, triathlons...with the occasional rd race

Last edited by Foilnz; 11-16-14 at 06:13 PM. Reason: Spelling mistake
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Old 11-16-14, 06:11 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider
That's nonsense. Best for what use? Are you road acing? Time trialing? Zip carbon wheels are a specialist's tool and there are far better choices for regular and casual riders.
Sorry if I've offended or said anything wrong...I've been in events since last year. My first bike was a cheap TT bike cus I thought it looked cool for the price lol. I now ride a normal rd bike with aero bars (foil15), cus I thought it was a steel for what it went for. And I wanted to do normal rd races...I see these flash wheels and assume they are up there...Not just ZIPP but all the flash wheels lol. I have become a prity strong rider...considering I used to weigh over 300lbs. If it helps to get faster then why not?
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Old 11-16-14, 06:22 PM
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Weight limits for wheels aren't as much a safety issue, but a wheel life and serviceability issue. There's plenty of upside margin of error in any stated weight limit, but heavier riders, or riders that ride heavy won't see the life that lighter or better riders will get.

To give you some idea of wheel strength, I ride lightweight tubular tire wheels built with 15g spokes. I once pulled up behind a car stopped at a corner, only to have the driver throw it into reverse and start backing into a parking spot. His rear bumper caught by front wheel and climbed up onto it as we both rolled backward. I might not be typing, but he didn't have a limited slip differential, so it stopped when one of his rear wheels was of the ground, with 1/4 of the car supported on my wheel.

When I let him down, the wheel was 100% undamaged, so we know that even a light wheel can handle a static load of 750#s.

If the OP likes light equipment, wants the Zipps, has the dough to spare, and is willing to live with shorter wheel life, then he can go ahead and ride them. However at his weight, I suggest riding light, ie. standing and helping the bike over major bumps, and the like. IMO the real issue won't be the wheel's weight rating, but that the wheels and likely the frame will limit the rider to tires narrower than what would serve him better.
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Old 11-16-14, 06:52 PM
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This is why there are wheels described as race day wheels and those as training wheels. Race wheels are lighter and quicker, and far less durable. If you can get a wheel swap in 15 seconds, durability does not matter much. If you have the cash, buy two sets of wheels and enjoy.
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Old 11-16-14, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY
Weight limits for wheels aren't as much a safety issue, but a wheel life and serviceability issue. There's plenty of upside margin of error in any stated weight limit, but heavier riders, or riders that ride heavy won't see the life that lighter or better riders will get.

To give you some idea of wheel strength, I ride lightweight tubular tire wheels built with 15g spokes. I once pulled up behind a car stopped at a corner, only to have the driver throw it into reverse and start backing into a parking spot. His rear bumper caught by front wheel and climbed up onto it as we both rolled backward. I might not be typing, but he didn't have a limited slip differential, so it stopped when one of his rear wheels was of the ground, with 1/4 of the car supported on my wheel.

When I let him down, the wheel was 100% undamaged, so we know that even a light wheel can handle a static load of 750#s.

If the OP likes light equipment, wants the Zipps, has the dough to spare, and is willing to live with shorter wheel life, then he can go ahead and ride them. However at his weight, I suggest riding light, ie. standing and helping the bike over major bumps, and the like. IMO the real issue won't be the wheel's weight rating, but that the wheels and likely the frame will limit the rider to tires narrower than what would serve him better.
Thanks for that FBinNY,

I am open to suggestions? If you think there are other options that may help or improve my cycling im willing to learn. i have made a lifestyle change for the better and im not about to stop. So i am still losing weight and going to work hard to get better and stronger

Cheers
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Old 11-16-14, 09:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Foilnz
Thanks for that FBinNY,

I am open to suggestions? If you think there are other options that may help or improve my cycling im willing to learn. i have made a lifestyle change for the better and im not about to stop. So i am still losing weight and going to work hard to get better and stronger

Cheers
I never make brand recommendations here, so no help on that front. But I am a big believer in wider tires for heavier riders. Other than that I couldn't help you much because of the variables. Years ago, among my riding circle there was a ballerina and a gorilla. The ballerina really was, being part of the NYC ballet, and must have weighed all of 110#s, or so. My gorilla friend was just big, not fat, 230#s of solid muscle.

So who was tough on wheels? The ballerina who could somehow destroy everything she rode. OTOH my gorilla friend rode like the dancing elephant from Fantasia. He had incredible bike handling skills, was smooth as silk, and never broke anything. On the bike he had all the grace, that the dancer left on th stage.

So, regardless of what you ride, the key is to learn to ride light.
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Old 11-17-14, 06:31 AM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY
I never make brand recommendations here, so no help on that front. But I am a big believer in wider tires for heavier riders. Other than that I couldn't help you much because of the variables. Years ago, among my riding circle there was a ballerina and a gorilla. The ballerina really was, being part of the NYC ballet, and must have weighed all of 110#s, or so. My gorilla friend was just big, not fat, 230#s of solid muscle.

So who was tough on wheels? The ballerina who could somehow destroy everything she rode. OTOH my gorilla friend rode like the dancing elephant from Fantasia. He had incredible bike handling skills, was smooth as silk, and never broke anything. On the bike he had all the grace, that the dancer left on th stage.

So, regardless of what you ride, the key is to learn to ride light.
Great word pictures there.
Even uncoordinated 250 lb klutzes like me can ride light even if we don't have the gracefulness of a ballerina.Like you said, taking the bumps out of the saddle helps immensely.
I don't have anything less than 32 spoke wheels in my own fleet (but even the 32 spoke wheels are on a cargo bike that carries up to a 400lb load), but I have had to test ride bikes I've repaired with low spoke count race wheels, and I'm always very conscious of how I hit bumps. Sometimes, if the light wheels were also on a frail looking frame, (which was often), I would ask one of the smaller (they were all smaller) mechs to do the test ride.
The moral is, the light wheels did not scare me out of riding it, but the uber light frame did.
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Old 11-17-14, 09:38 AM
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3 cross 32 spoke is what got used on the cobbled road to Roubaix , when the sponsors didn't have something to prove , and supplied funds and wheels..


special race day wheels can be a thing..

Last edited by fietsbob; 11-17-14 at 10:43 AM.
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Old 11-17-14, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY
Weight limits for wheels aren't as much a safety issue, but a wheel life and serviceability issue. There's plenty of upside margin of error in any stated weight limit, but heavier riders, or riders that ride heavy won't see the life that lighter or better riders will get.

To give you some idea of wheel strength, I ride lightweight tubular tire wheels built with 15g spokes. I once pulled up behind a car stopped at a corner, only to have the driver throw it into reverse and start backing into a parking spot. His rear bumper caught by front wheel and climbed up onto it as we both rolled backward. I might not be typing, but he didn't have a limited slip differential, so it stopped when one of his rear wheels was of the ground, with 1/4 of the car supported on my wheel.

When I let him down, the wheel was 100% undamaged, so we know that even a light wheel can handle a static load of 750#s.
Wow! Great story.
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