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Legnano value

Old 03-07-24, 04:03 PM
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Legnano value

neighbor has this that he found cleaning up an empty hose . It looks
to be in great shape but would need refurbished. I've done 80s Japanese bikes
but never Italian, I think it was a top of the line bike in 1972. So how
much is this bike worth as is or refurbished and how hard would it be to refurbish? Thanks




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Old 03-07-24, 04:22 PM
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The more campagnolo components the bigger the value. What is the makers mark on the headset, hubs, and bottom bracket?
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Old 03-07-24, 07:07 PM
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Originally Posted by ign1te
The more campagnolo components the bigger the value. What is the makers mark on the headset, hubs, and bottom bracket?
-----

machine wears the Nuovo Record road ensemble save for brakes

seven eighty as it sits


-----
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Old 03-07-24, 08:32 PM
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I am not in the market for a Legnano smaller than 59cm c-to-c nor one that isn’t lizard green but for a rideable and collectible bicycle like this I would far rather buy it as is than after a renovation, much less a professional renovation. Bringing older bicycles back to life is part of the fun. FWIW YMMV
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Old 03-08-24, 07:06 AM
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I didn't realize this was such a collectors bike. I was going to make
an offer because it's a friends who knows nothing about bicycles
but I think it's worth a lot more than I would be willing to pay
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Old 03-08-24, 09:06 AM
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As-is, I have that at about $350. It can be worth more cleaned up, more still fully functional.
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Old 03-08-24, 09:32 AM
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A bike like this I would much rather buy as is. I do not trust restorations by others, unless I know them well and know the quality of their work. Some people I know do mediocre work, so just knowing them does not mean I have confidence in their work.

A local flipper in our area sells over 100 bikes a year. The only bikes I will buy from him are either in his scrap pile, or ones he hasn't touched. Every hour of his work = 3 hours of my time to undo, and some of his work causes irreversible damage (please put down the steel wool). Note, I am not comparing your work to this guy, as I bet you do nice work. Still I would prefer as is.

On recreational level bikes, buyers want ready to ride, serviced bikes. On the rarer or more valuable stuff, they want originality. Note, the local pool of buyers wanting older original, higher end bikes can be very limited. In my area, I may be the only one. On eBay, you can reach hundreds or thousands of these buyers.
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Old 03-08-24, 09:38 AM
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Offer what YOU feel it is worth. It clearly has not been ridden in quite some time , so it will need to be disassembled , cleaned , greased , and reassembled , not to mention whatever consumables it will need . Right now , even as desirable as this bike is , the market is not good. The above estimate may be close , but who knows? The owner may just want to see it brought back to life and enjoyed. If it is your size and you like it go after it and offer what you can .If you are looking to "flip" bikes , that's a different situation. You may make a $100 or so but spend a lot of time and labor. This bike should go directly to the one who will enjoy it , IMHO. Joe
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Old 03-08-24, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by juvela
-----

machine wears the Nuovo Record road ensemble save for brakes

seven eighty as it sits


-----
The head set might be Stronglight as said pretty all top end compoents for the time the bike was.
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Old 03-08-24, 03:40 PM
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Originally Posted by zukahn1
The head set might be Stronglight as said pretty all top end compoents for the time the bike was.

-----



here is an image from the OP of the bicycle's lower stack

a comparable image showing the upper stack has not been posted

if you enlarge it a few steps you will be able to make out "____MPAGNOLO__"



-----

Last edited by juvela; 03-08-24 at 03:44 PM. Reason: addition
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Old 03-08-24, 09:02 PM
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...it looks like the paint and graphics are in pretty good shape, under the grease and dirt. That's a plus, and adds value (if you're looking for a project like this one.) Also, it looks like everything is still there, in terms of the components. Also a plus and adds value. Negatives are that it needs complete dismantling, cleaning, and reassembly with fresh grease, new rubber (tires, brake blocks, probably the brake lever hoods are shot.) New cables and housing, maybe new bearings (those are cheap), new chain, sort of up in the air whether stuff like the freewheel still works OK. There are a lot of ifs.

The wheels are laced with tubular rims. That's an extra hassle on my projects, because I just don't use tubular tires any more. So either you get used to mounting, gluing, and sometimes replacing tubulars, or you have to relace the wheels with clincher rims. For me, that's a minus, and lowers value (what I'm willing to pay for a project bike.) I can't imagine you could make any money.

Legnano does have some collector value. I'm not sure how many collectors are still breathing (and collecting). It's fewer than it was ten years ago.

Mostly, don't get involved with it unless it's exactly the right size frame for you. It's a lot of work, as a project. (Although less than stripping, repainting, and restoring the box lining and decals on that frame.) The Reynolds 531 ones are interesting. I've had one of each (Reynolds tubing and the other stuff they used ...Falck maybe ??). The Reynolds frame tubing was an upgrade, and it cost extra.

You can look at the various articles and links on the condorino website for more info. https://condorino.com/legnano-timeline/

I paid about 400 bucks for one that I had to do a similar overhaul and wheel re-lacing for about ten years ago. I think the one I bought had a few components missing, but they weren't that hard to find. Probably worth a little less in today's market, unless you sell it some place like e-bay. If it's your friend who now owns it, figure out how much it will actually cost you to get it up and running. Then figure an offer, keeping in mind it was free to him.

Unless it's your size exactly, and you plan on riding it for a while, I would say just let it pass on by.
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Old 03-08-24, 10:39 PM
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...also, that bicycle has a standard seat lug, not the unique seat lug and binder bolt that was a Legnano trademark.
If you look at that timeline link, it is either a lesser model (unlikely), or it is post 1975. I don't know which model that is, I'm not expert enough.

The Reynolds frame tubing argues for a better, Roma Olympiad model.

It might have a sticker or decal on there someplace that says. Seems to have a sticker on the headtube, rather than the Legnano head badge.
That also hints at a later bike. I think the collectors more highly value the ones with the metal head badge.

But your bicycle as pictured does have Universal 61 brakes, so '72 or earlier by that. I really don't know what it is, in terms of dating it.
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Old 03-09-24, 03:39 AM
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Originally Posted by 3alarmer
.
...also, that bicycle has a standard seat lug, not the unique seat lug and binder bolt that was a Legnano trademark.
If you look at that timeline link, it is either a lesser model (unlikely), or it is post 1975. I don't know which model that is, I'm not expert enough.

The Reynolds frame tubing argues for a better, Roma Olympiad model.

It might have a sticker or decal on there someplace that says. Seems to have a sticker on the headtube, rather than the Legnano head badge.
That also hints at a later bike. I think the collectors more highly value the ones with the metal head badge.

But your bicycle as pictured does have Universal 61 brakes, so '72 or earlier by that. I really don't know what it is, in terms of dating it.
Deep dive into estimating dates for Legnano bikes.
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Old 03-09-24, 08:18 AM
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Is your intent to keep it or flip it? Does the bike fit you?

In this market, I would say $500-600 is tops, what I would be willing to pay. You can do the research on sold items on the auction site and most likely, you could get more if you were to part it out, provided you are willing to put in the time to get everything cleaned up. Personally, I wouldn’t do this, as it appears you have an unmolested bike in original condition.

The detractors (strictly my opinion) are the color isn’t the iconic lizard green for which Legnano is known, the seat lug not the classic style with the binder bolt under the lug.

But, it’s still a very collectible bike, with a Reynolds frame, and top of the line components. And it looks like it has been cared for, despite the dirty appearance.

I paid close to what I mentioned for a ‘69/‘70 Roma, about 5-6 years ago, and just under $400 for a Frejus frame, with Legnano color and seat lug, just a couple years ago.
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Old 03-09-24, 10:11 AM
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Thats a spit and a polish bike. All original, all there, dirty and dusty. An afternoon of cleaning and fettling and it would be one heck of a bike. Plusses for me...sew-ups, 49/52 chainrings, TTT stem with decal, original hood Universal brakes with original quick releases, Unica saddle......pump and steel TA cage to boot.

I'm with others here. The cleaning and refurbishing is part of the fun. Bikes in this condition are the best.

$600
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Old 03-09-24, 12:22 PM
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I have a soft spot for Legnanos (2 in my inventory) since they lead me down the rabbit hole of vintage stuff. Both of mine are ~1960 so a very different situation.

A 70ís era bike made of 531 with a slathering of Campy is a great recipe but the Universal 61s seem out of place. Tubulars are generally a minus in the market.

As others have stated, the vintage bike market is very weak right now. I like barn finds especially if they are original. To me, $400 max since there is a lot of work to be done and wear items are in unknown condition. Also, very much a niche market for bikes like this and most of those people are on this forum.
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Old 03-09-24, 01:54 PM
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Most of the stuff is campag. Given that its functional and not too shabby, you have about 200$+ in components alone. The seatpost is campag as well, try your very best not to scratch it as you remove it.
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Old 03-09-24, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by RustyJames
A 70ís era bike made of 531 with a slathering of Campy is a great recipe but the Universal 61s seem out of place. Tubulars are generally a minus in the market.
Actually the Universal 61's are what would be expected during the early 70's. Even Cinelli spec'd them on their Super Corsa. Campy brakes were so crazy expensive it took a few years before they were common on top of the line machines.
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Old 03-10-24, 12:28 PM
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Not meaning to bust someone's bubble, but the OP's Legnano is not top of the line. It is a Legnano Gran Premio, I believe. I have been lucky enough to own two in my vintage road bike collection efforts...



That said, the Grand Premio is a really decent old Italian bike, in my opinion. Lots of chrome and great lines, make for an attractive machine. When I get back to Canada, I plan to fit my Gran Premio with tubulars, and might even give the old girl a paint and art job...
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Old 03-10-24, 12:32 PM
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In my area, the bike is darn near worthless. People can't give vintage road bikes away. Were I buying the OP's bike, $200 US to start and then into negotiation. Were I selling = $1000 after clean up and street restoration. That said, if the OP restores, he will loose money should he wish to sell. The bottom fell out out of the vintage road bike market.
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Old 03-10-24, 12:52 PM
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..it does look like the picture of the '72 Gran Premio on the Condorino website.
It would be nice if we could read that sticker on the downtube, under the pump.

I think that might be a model name, but am unsure.

They did make and sell 531 examples of both models.
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Old 03-10-24, 05:45 PM
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If we can believe the OP’s bike is original, the thread over on the C&V board clearly shows a decal on the downtube, stating it is the Olimpiade Record Specialissima.

There is a write up over on Mark Campbell’s Legnano site, showing the differences between The Roma and Gran Premio models. But, that article applies to older models, and not the newer style frames.

https://condorino.com/2018/03/10/rom...nterchangeably.
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Old 03-10-24, 08:59 PM
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Unless it fits & you plan on rebuilding it as a regular rider, I’d polish it up, do a basic service and advertise it as a barn find in April. Maybe, arrange a 1/3-2/3 $ split with the OP. A recycled set of Campagnolo hubbed vintage wheels wheels would probably help the salability.
Just my personal preference.
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Old 03-10-24, 11:43 PM
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Originally Posted by randyjawa
Not meaning to bust someone's bubble, but the OP's Legnano is not top of the line. It is a Legnano Gran Premio, I believe. I have been lucky enough to own two in my vintage road bike collection efforts...

That said, the Grand Premio is a really decent old Italian bike, in my opinion. Lots of chrome and great lines, make for an attractive machine. When I get back to Canada, I plan to fit my Gran Premio with tubulars, and might even give the old girl a paint and art job...
If the OP's Legnano is not the top-of-the-line model, what differentiates the TOTL model from the bike pictured in the OP's first post? Everything I see on that bike argues that it is the top model. The frame, fork, and components, including the Universal brakes, appear to be identical to the bike one of my teammates rode in the mid-1960's (except for the early-'70's Legnano/Frejus-era seat binder bolt on the OP's bike).
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Old 03-12-24, 09:17 AM
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Originally Posted by big chainring
Actually the Universal 61's are what would be expected during the early 70's. Even Cinelli spec'd them on their Super Corsa. Campy brakes were so crazy expensive it took a few years before they were common on top of the line machines.
+1 the Blue label Univesal's were top end OEM standard on lot of Italian bikes from early 60's to the mid 70's.
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