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Poll: Have Dropout Problem, Need Solution

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View Poll Results: Have Dropout Problem, Need Solution
Bend it back; that'll buff right out.
57.50%
Put a claw (mount-on hanger) on it; it'll never be straight and/or strong.
12.50%
Leave it; make it a ss/fixie.
0
0%
Cut it off, make it a ss/fixie.
7.50%
Part it out.
5.00%
Hire local framebuilder to replace dropout (not really an option).
2.50%
Other.
15.00%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 40. You may not vote on this poll

Poll: Have Dropout Problem, Need Solution

Old 02-12-16, 09:36 AM
  #26  
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I would try bending first, then if it fails, get a claw hanger.
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Old 02-12-16, 09:38 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by nlerner
I would also start with the vise, but I'd want something threaded into that hanger to make sure the threads don't get distorted in the straightening/flattening process.

I think that ship has already sailed. Threads are boogered. I don't see threading anything into it initially.
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Old 02-12-16, 09:42 AM
  #28  
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You should put an old hub in the dropouts before you attempt to bend it. This will prevent the dropout from closing or distorting too much. The thing you absolutely don't want to do is break the dropout off at the rear.
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Old 02-12-16, 09:53 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by MiloFrance
+1. Heat gun rather than torch might be more controllable.
A heat gun would not get things hot enough to make the steel dropout more malleable.

I vote to bend it back. If it doesn't crack or break, wonderful! Chances are the threads will be trashed, though, but there's an easy fix for that:



Wheels MFG Drop Out Saver For Thick > Accessories > Tools > Frame Tools | Jenson USA

N.B. There are two thicknesses available; one for hangers less than 7mm thick, the other for hangers more than 7mm thick.

If the hanger does crack or break when straightened, then you can pursue more aggressive fixes, e.g. saw it off and use a bolt-on claw, have a framebuilder replace the dropout, etc.

Last edited by JohnDThompson; 02-12-16 at 09:56 AM.
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Old 02-12-16, 10:00 AM
  #30  
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I'm the dummy that voted have a frame guy replace the dropouts. But that infers that you "could" just sell/ship the frame cheap, to someone who does live near a frame guy, if you don't.
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Old 02-12-16, 10:13 AM
  #31  
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Thanks everyone for the advice! Lots of good input.

FWIW, the derailleur was mounted when I bought the bike. I removed the RD in order to photo the hanger. It was a little tight, but I do still have some hope that a bolt will thread back in, at least before I start re-bending it.

Up the flagpole...I'm thinking of getting a bolt with an allen socket from the hardware store, cutting down the end of the bolt, threading it into the hanger, then put it in a vise. That way, maybe the bolt with keep the hole from ovalizing and also chase the threads on the way out.
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Old 02-12-16, 10:19 AM
  #32  
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I vote for using a vise, because i have USED that method myself for a not-as-bad-as-this hanger repair and it worked. As others said you will either have success BECAUSE these are made from malleable steel and intended to take SOME amount of bending without cracking...OR it will crack. You'd have to heat this up cherry-red with a powerful torch if you wanted to do any bending beyond cold-setting, no heat gun or little creme-brulee torch will do anything except burn off the paint and grease.
And the vise will only take it so far cause you have to bend it PAST the spring-back limit, so after to get it as far as the massive bench vise goes, use a DO alignment tool. If you can't borrow one in the east bay, come on over to the HPSY in SF (remember where?) and I'll loan you mine for the job.
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Old 02-12-16, 10:22 AM
  #33  
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The frame does not fit you.

Do the straightening as a learning exercise

Cut off the hanger.

Sell the frame knowing you are not endangering the next rider.
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Old 02-12-16, 10:36 AM
  #34  
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I like CliffordK's idea of clamping the hole with a bolt/nut, and I like mechanicmatt's idea of "forging" it flat using the jaws of a vise.

If one could combine these two ideas, I think we have a winner.

TimmyT has a good point by mentioning that the dropout's attachment to the stay's must also be respected.

Let the head-scratching continue...

Steel is real.
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Old 02-12-16, 01:16 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by mechanicmatt
I'd bend it but I wouldn't just start with a derailleur alignment tool. I'd take the wheel out first and sort of smash the whole area back down flat within the jaws of a 5" bench vice. Then once bent back down flattish use that tool to attempt to get it straight.
+1
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Old 02-12-16, 01:26 PM
  #36  
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all the correct answers have been taken so I'll offer some idiotic suggestions:

1. bend the derailleur to match the bent hanger.
2. angle iron bolted to hanger, drilled and tapped for derailleur
3. Hit it lots with a hammer until its close enough.
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Old 02-12-16, 02:05 PM
  #37  
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cut it off and throw a 3 speed hub on....make it a citibike or single speed
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Old 02-12-16, 02:07 PM
  #38  
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Make sure you have the right tool for the job:

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Old 02-12-16, 02:33 PM
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Geez, it's just a Viva Sport. Cut it off and put on a claw.

If you want to work on your skills, try to bend it back and see how it goes first. I'd start with a big ass wrench if you have one. IMO do this if and only if you have access to a derailleur hangar alignment tool and dropout alignment tools - and a tap.
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Old 02-12-16, 03:04 PM
  #40  
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Appears to be stamped from thick platestock rather than forged. This may make it more likely to survive the straightening process as it would be less brittle than a forged example. Keep in mind it bent this far without breaking/cracking.

If you get it close I have the Campag d/o alignment tool.
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Old 02-12-16, 05:13 PM
  #41  
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I vote "other"! Dry ice will shrink it right back into place


Actually this I agree with. I think you can do it if you take your time.

Originally Posted by MiloFrance
+1. Heat gun rather than torch might be more controllable.
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Old 02-12-16, 05:34 PM
  #42  
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Don't use a vice unless you can't find/have access to the correct tool. Use the derailleur hanger tool. The threads in the tool will protect the hanger threads, it'll keep the face of the hanger "planar", and you'll bend it back in the correct plane.

When I worked in different LBS's we'd regularly bend them back from similar conditions. Dropouts are made of mild steel, and can be bent back without breaking as long as you don't do it more than a few times.

A few years ago I bought a donor bike for my daughter in the same condition. The derailleur was actually sheared off, but the hanger held on, and was bent back like yours. Here's a before and after picture:



Although the hanger isn't used (I built an 8-speed Alfine IGH wheel for this bike), it's in perfectly aligned position. Some day we may want to make it a derailler bike.

Even if the hanger was removed, you could still braze a new one on without removing the entire dropout. Been there and done that too. Probably someone had a bent hanger and decided to hack it off:



One repair you can do yourself (someone's already offered use of a derailleur hanger local to you), the other you'd have to pay a framebuilder to do.
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Last edited by gugie; 02-12-16 at 05:51 PM.
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Old 02-12-16, 05:46 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by hatrack71
I'd be suprised if it didn't crack while bending back. But that really is the first step- trying to cold bend it back. Heat will further weaken it .. as will bending it back. The least stress the better. A long handled crescent wrench or long Pony clamp would be best to get leverage.
I would be surprised if it did crack.
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Old 02-12-16, 05:51 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by unworthy1
I vote for using a vise, because i have USED that method myself for a not-as-bad-as-this hanger repair and it worked.
If all you have access to is a vice, I'd say go for it. I grew up on a farm, we used a hammer, crescent wrench and a screwdriver to fix a lot of stuff.

But if you have access to the right tool, use it.
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Old 02-12-16, 09:14 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by gaucho777
Oh, yeah? That's a tempting offer. Do you prefer beer, wine, or whiskey?
Woohoo! Beer!

I'll loan you the dropout alignment tools too, if you need.
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Old 02-12-16, 10:08 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by TimmyT
You should put an old hub in the dropouts before you attempt to bend it. This will prevent the dropout from closing or distorting too much. The thing you absolutely don't want to do is break the dropout off at the rear.
TimmyT brings up a good point. That's a lot of bending, and if you don't have a dropout alignment set, it's great advice.

Originally Posted by delicious
Woohoo! Beer!

I'll loan you the dropout alignment tools too, if you need.
Now that's what's it's all about, help a buddy, share a beer!
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Old 02-13-16, 07:56 AM
  #47  
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I would obtain 3 -10x1mm fasteners to use two with nuts and washers to stabilize the axle area, one longer one to thread into the hangar. Get out the acetylene torch with a small tip, heat the bend to dull red and align by eye using the long bolt as a lever. All after referenceing an old college text book, quench the area with a wet towel or spray bottle with water to harden it, the torch work having annealed it.
The severe bend I think is not a good candidate for a cold bend return.
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Old 02-13-16, 01:24 PM
  #48  
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I'll second @davester's advice. Take it to a framebuilder. I think it could be repaired.
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Old 02-13-16, 03:05 PM
  #49  
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pictures of the repair attempt please!

Framebuilder? Please, it's no treasure.

Since the threads already look mangled I'd hammer, vice, crescent wrench it back into shape and see if I could mash the hole round enough again to run a tap through it. If that doesn't work I'd drill it out for the wheel manufacturing insert. If those fail I'd cut it and put on a claw.

As others have said this is no high end gem, just make it functional for the last cost. It's a fun poll thread though.
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Old 02-13-16, 03:46 PM
  #50  
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I replace dropouts , But you can change the drivetrain over to an IGH and have 'speeds' without needing a derailleur .
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