Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

First recondition

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

First recondition

Old 05-19-16, 06:42 PM
  #1  
Shamrock
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Garden State exit 135
Posts: 475
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
First recondition

I have some questions but only a couple for now.Im working on a woman's 37 year old schwinn le tour III.If I buy a new free wheel how do I know it fits before I buy it. If a free wheel comes off with a particular tool can only a free wheel that is of that tool be reinstalled. Thanks
Shamrock is offline  
Old 05-19-16, 07:08 PM
  #2  
Lascauxcaveman 
Senior Member
 
Lascauxcaveman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Port Angeles, WA
Posts: 7,899

Bikes: A green one, "Ragleigh," or something.

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1577 Post(s)
Liked 471 Times in 275 Posts
There are probably a dozen fairly common different freewheel remover tools, but the one for your schwinn is likely a one of the very common ones. Post a closeup pic of it the old freewheel, with the wheel removed from the bike, and we'll be able to tell you which one to get. Also know that the freewheel will be much easier to remove if you have a bench vise in which to clamp the freewheel tool.

Once removed, you can install any "English threaded" freewheel (the most common kind) on your old hub; no tool is needed for installation, only removal. To install, just grease the threads, spin it on, and the first time you ride it, the force of pedaling tightens it up.
__________________
● 1971 Grandis SL ● 1972 Lambert Grand Prix frankenbike ● 1972 Raleigh Super Course fixie ● 1973 Nishiki Semi-Pro ● 1980 Apollo "Legnano" ● 1984 Peugeot Vagabond ● 1985 Shogun Prairie Breaker ● 1986 Merckx Super Corsa ● 1987 Schwinn Tempo ● 1988 Schwinn Voyageur ● 1989 Trek 400 ● 1989 Bottechia Team ADR replica ● 1990 Cannondale ST600 ● 1993 Technium RT600 ● 1996 Kona Lava Dome ●

Last edited by Lascauxcaveman; 05-19-16 at 07:14 PM.
Lascauxcaveman is offline  
Old 05-19-16, 07:14 PM
  #3  
Roll-Monroe-Co
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,308
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 62 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Hi. There are other standards out there for freewheel threading, but you'd have to really go out of your way to find one. Any new freewheel you buy in the US is going to be standard threading for the US.

You just want to look for a freewheel (not free hub cassette) of the same number of speeds (except for 5-speed and Ultra 6 -- see link). Aside from 6/Ultra 6, other freewheels up to 8 speed are going to be interchangeable. I'm going to guess you have a 5 speed freewheel.

The only deal with the removal tool is that if you buy a tool, it would be nice to buy a freewheel with the same tool standard. Your ability to remove the freewheel (with the right tool) is the only issue--it does not affect interchangeability on the wheel.

You don't need a tool to install a freewheel. You just lube the threads on the hub and spin it on. JUST DONT CROSS THREAD IT!!!! The first time you ride it, it will feel like it's slipping as it tightens down. After a few cranks, you're good to go.

See here for more info: Traditional Thread-on Freewheels

EDIT: By the way, you may want to watch that the freewheel you buy has the same range of speeds (tooth counts) as the freewheel you remove. This will obviate the need to change the length of the chain.

For example, the 1978 Le Tour III came with a 14-28 (highest gear 14 teeth, lowest gear 28 teeth).

EDIT 2: OTOH, you'll learn a lot more if you install a new chain or have to change the length.

Last edited by Roll-Monroe-Co; 05-19-16 at 07:19 PM.
Roll-Monroe-Co is offline  
Old 05-19-16, 07:23 PM
  #4  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 7,931

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400, 2013 Novara Randonee, 1990 Trek 970

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1708 Post(s)
Liked 1,359 Times in 880 Posts
If you figure on removing a freewheel just this once, or it's an obscure tool type(unlikely) I just have the shop remove it and pay the $5 they charge.

Said by the guy with 4 different freewheel tools.
dedhed is offline  
Old 05-19-16, 07:42 PM
  #5  
jyl
Senior Member
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,642

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 140 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 389 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 43 Times in 28 Posts
Do you need to replace the freewheel? Most of the time, old freewheels will work fine if you place the wheel flat and drip oil into the freewheel while turning it.

If you suspect the old freewheel teeth are worn out, wait to see how it works while riding. Often old bikes were not ridden enough to wear out. If the old freewheel is black and greasy, well, they all look that way after awhile, unless you're really obsessive about cleaning.
jyl is offline  
Old 05-19-16, 07:55 PM
  #6  
Lascauxcaveman 
Senior Member
 
Lascauxcaveman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Port Angeles, WA
Posts: 7,899

Bikes: A green one, "Ragleigh," or something.

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1577 Post(s)
Liked 471 Times in 275 Posts
Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Said by the guy with 4 different freewheel tools.
Ha! I've got 6
__________________
● 1971 Grandis SL ● 1972 Lambert Grand Prix frankenbike ● 1972 Raleigh Super Course fixie ● 1973 Nishiki Semi-Pro ● 1980 Apollo "Legnano" ● 1984 Peugeot Vagabond ● 1985 Shogun Prairie Breaker ● 1986 Merckx Super Corsa ● 1987 Schwinn Tempo ● 1988 Schwinn Voyageur ● 1989 Trek 400 ● 1989 Bottechia Team ADR replica ● 1990 Cannondale ST600 ● 1993 Technium RT600 ● 1996 Kona Lava Dome ●
Lascauxcaveman is offline  
Old 05-20-16, 04:26 AM
  #7  
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 13,369

Bikes: 73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, 72 Peugeot UO-8, 82 Peugeot TH8, 87 Bianchi Brava, 76? Masi Grand Criterium, 87 Centurion Ironman Expert, 74 Motobecane Champion Team, 86 & 77 Gazelle champion mondial, 81? Grandis, 82? Tommasini, 83 Peugeot PF10

Mentioned: 184 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1202 Post(s)
Liked 367 Times in 167 Posts
Take it to a shop to find the right tool. There are at least two different "2-notch" tools that are more or less indistinguishable visually.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline  
Old 05-20-16, 05:03 AM
  #8  
randyjawa 
Senior Member
 
randyjawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada - burrrrr!
Posts: 10,920

Bikes: 1958 Rabeneick 120D, 1968 Legnano Gran Premio, 196? Torpado Professional, 2000 Marinoni Piuma

Mentioned: 187 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1131 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 969 Times in 587 Posts
As already mentioned, there are many different freewheel tools available. You must use the right one and use it correctly. Over the years, these have all found their way into my tool box and I have had need to use every one...



Best advice I can offer is, simply, to get a shop to remove the freewheel, using the correct tool. Then buy the identical tool for yourself, unless you plan to never take the FW off yourself. One warning, if that is a fair way to say this - try to avoid prong pullers, be they fitted with two or even four prongss. When you get your new freewheel, seek one that uses a splined pattern. They are less likely to slip or shatter...
__________________
"98% of the bikes I buy are projects".
randyjawa is offline  
Old 05-20-16, 06:22 AM
  #9  
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 13,369

Bikes: 73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, 72 Peugeot UO-8, 82 Peugeot TH8, 87 Bianchi Brava, 76? Masi Grand Criterium, 87 Centurion Ironman Expert, 74 Motobecane Champion Team, 86 & 77 Gazelle champion mondial, 81? Grandis, 82? Tommasini, 83 Peugeot PF10

Mentioned: 184 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1202 Post(s)
Liked 367 Times in 167 Posts
Another tip for notch pullers I haven't seen here yet is this: Before you try unscrewing the FW put the QR skewer back on over the puller and make it almost snug. This helps keep the tool's prongs from slipping out of the notches.

I use a large adjustable wrench on the tool, then whack the free end of the wrench with a rubber-coated dead-weight mallet. It may take several whacks. Works like a charm.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline  
Old 05-20-16, 06:46 AM
  #10  
Shamrock
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Garden State exit 135
Posts: 475
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Thanks for the help.I ride the twin brother of this bike.I would like to change the free wheel to help me climb in the hills.Im also going to buy new wheels for the project bike.And when my wife finds out I have a lower gear than her,she will want one.So I will be changing out free wheels on both bikes.I bought the tool yesterday.
Shamrock is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
stevek1ng
Bicycle Mechanics
20
03-15-13 09:17 AM
Giorgi
Bicycle Mechanics
9
04-11-12 03:26 PM
jeneralist
Classic & Vintage
6
04-03-12 07:46 AM
yummygooey
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
11
09-27-10 02:01 PM
john_dun
Bicycle Mechanics
15
01-02-10 10:07 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.