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Mirrors...

Old 07-23-16, 09:56 PM
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Mirrors...

So what are you all doing for mirrors on your bikes?

I need a mirror. I've been unable to get used to a helmet or glasses mounted mirror. Personally, the best position for a mirror is the where the old Mirrycle Mirrors sit on non-aero levers. It's barely a little glance to be able to see something in the mirror and recognize it. It's also in your peripheral vision so that you see lights or motion.




But having non-aero levers add a little challenge to having a mirror. I don't like the idea of using a bar end mirror- that's actually more than just a glance, that's turning your head and looking down. That means looking and having to readjust yourself to comprehend what you're seeing.

With my Trek 400 Elance with 6400 aero levers, I've been using an Axiom clamp on mirror. However, when it's in the right position (or as "right" as it will be), the clamp and the arm are in the way when you're on the hoods or braking.




Since I've redone my Trek 720, I've been using the Axiom mirror- while it's in the neighborhood of being right- it's not quite right.




So... after all that yammering, what other options or ideas are you all using for mirrors?
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Old 07-23-16, 10:00 PM
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I don't have or a pic but the bar end ones are given good reviews by a few guys I ride with. They make small and a slightly larger size.
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Old 07-24-16, 02:59 AM
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David,

You've covered most of the options. I do have a mirror which attaches to the bars with a loop around rubberband and a hook. It is quick on and off and has a bit of pivot up and down. Adjustment is a combination of placement and the pivot.

It is called the Zefal Spy Bike/Handlebar Mounted Mirror and is sold by Nashbar. While the pics show it at the end of the drop, it can be placed in several locations.

I find, however, that I cannot use it as safely and efficiently as helmet/glasses mirrors.
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Old 07-24-16, 06:58 AM
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Like Bob I do not care for bar mounted mirrors, glasses mount are OK, much prefer helmet mount. What does not work with glasses and helmet mounts?
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Old 07-24-16, 07:13 AM
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Sprintech.
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Old 07-24-16, 07:25 AM
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I have the axiom on my commuter as the long arm lets me see past the pannier. I'm almost always in the hoods so it's location doesn't bother me. Be aware the new ones are junk as the screws to tighten are now rivets and can't be tightened. I had broken the axiom when the bike fell over, but was able to fix it with drill, wire, and JB weld. I also purchased a Mirrcyle that mounts on the brifter which was OK but didn't sit quite as far out as the axiom to clear the bag.

I never liked the helmet/glasses mounts as urban commuting it blocked a section of front view. I don't need a perfect view just see what's coming up behind. I find urban commuting I actually watch my mirror just as much as ahead. Ahead I can see for blocks and know what the upcoming hazards are, back, not so much. It's gotten so I don't even like to ride a bike without a mirror and have them on every one.

My Gran Prix has a bar end one, as does my flat bar hybrid. My Sprite has a big chrome handlebar mount but I had to bend the arm to actually see anything.

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Old 07-24-16, 07:26 AM
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I use a Blackburn Road Mirror-- it mounts to the brake hood with a velcro strap.




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Old 07-24-16, 07:27 AM
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I too have tried all the combinations. Liked the Mirrcycle best, but gave that bike my pastor a few years ago. Still have a small bar end mounted on one of my Bikes, and have always used a glasses mount, "take a look" mirror as well. One negative of the glasses mount is that you get so used to them that it's easy to forget you have it on! Before my retirement, this happened several times and fellow workers were either to polite or to amused to inform me as I went about my workaday. Solved that by mounting my mirror on a pair of sunglasses. Don
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Old 07-24-16, 09:59 AM
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Tried mirrors on the bike, helmet mount works best.

Mirrors mounted on the bike would come loose or get knocked off.

Taped this light weight bike shop mirror to helmet. As shown.
It has a satisfactory range of adjustment.
When I am looking straight ahead, it is simple to see entire road behind.

Good question, btw.
Rear vision is extremely critical when by the road, even on the dirt path.
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Old 07-24-16, 10:22 AM
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I know this doesn't answer your question, but although it took me a few rides I got sorted out with a helmet mounted mirror and now won't ride without one. I can scan a large swath of the street behind me with a small head movement. I use drop bars and bar end shifters so the bar end mirrors are out. Since the helmets have the mirrors, it doesn't matter what bike I ride.
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Old 07-24-16, 10:40 AM
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Can not review because I just bought it and it has not arrived.

But, I got the Sella Italia Eyelink.



The myrricle mirrors are great for mount bike bars, and can be made to work on a road bike with some engineering. It does not seem that anyone makes a really good one for drop bars, though.
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Old 07-24-16, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by easyupbug View Post
Like Bob I do not care for bar mounted mirrors, glasses mount are OK, much prefer helmet mount. What does not work with glasses and helmet mounts?
What I like about bar mounted mirrors is that the mirror is always pointed in the direction you're looking. With the helmet/glasses mirrors, you have to look- process where your vision is- move your head- then process what you're seeing.

I can imagine that you get used to it- with experience you can get good at it. But having a mirror in a fixed location with a fixed view is just easier, quicker and safer.
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Old 07-24-16, 11:27 AM
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If I chose to use a mirror it would be the end-plug type. They are convex wide angle. That would be my first try at it.

[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 07-24-16, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
What I like about bar mounted mirrors is that the mirror is always pointed in the direction you're looking. With the helmet/glasses mirrors, you have to look- process where your vision is- move your head- then process what you're seeing.

I can imagine that you get used to it- with experience you can get good at it. But having a mirror in a fixed location with a fixed view is just easier, quicker and safer.
I agree with that in your case but I am able to get total rear view w/o moving my head when my helmet mirror is properly adjusted and it is always in the corner of my glasses so I see out of peripheral vision cars/bikes coming up behind me,
which I appreciate.
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Old 07-24-16, 05:51 PM
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
What I like about bar mounted mirrors is that the mirror is always pointed in the direction you're looking. With the helmet/glasses mirrors, you have to look- process where your vision is- move your head- then process what you're seeing.

I can imagine that you get used to it- with experience you can get good at it. But having a mirror in a fixed location with a fixed view is just easier, quicker and safer.
The nice thing about helmet mirrors is that you should be normally looking forward, where most of the traffic issues are. With your helmet mirror set up properly, it will be showing you what is directly behind you. If this isn't the case, the mirror needs to be adjusted.

The other nice thing about a helmet mirror is that it is located roughly 3.5" from my eye, and the one I use is a little over 1" in diameter. Using basic trig, that tells me that it provides a 16 degree field of view. With a handlebar mirror located 36 inches away from your eye (and probably more), you would need a 5 inch diameter mirror to get the same field of view.

I've had friends that initially had difficulty with helmet mirrors, but with time, were able to adapt to them.


Steve in Peoria
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Old 07-25-16, 07:05 AM
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
I have the axiom on my commuter as the long arm lets me see past the pannier. I'm almost always in the hoods so it's location doesn't bother me. Be aware the new ones are junk as the screws to tighten are now rivets and can't be tightened. I had broken the axiom when the bike fell over, but was able to fix it with drill, wire, and JB weld.
That's a drag about them cheapening up the arm hardware.
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Old 07-25-16, 07:08 AM
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I bought a Safe Zone Helmet Mirror from Amazon a few years back. It has a huge 2.5" mirror and is very sturdy.

Looks dorky, but give you a clear wide range view.
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Old 07-25-16, 07:08 AM
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Originally Posted by chewybrian View Post
Can not review because I just bought it and it has not arrived.

But, I got the Sella Italia Eyelink.



The myrricle mirrors are great for mount bike bars, and can be made to work on a road bike with some engineering. It does not seem that anyone makes a really good one for drop bars, though.

That is about the cat's pyjamas! But it's a little more expensive than a pair of pyjamas for a cat... yow.

But outrageously cool! Thank you!


EDIT: it seems there's a HUGE range of prices for these- some at half the price I originally saw.
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Old 07-25-16, 07:31 AM
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Originally Posted by steelbikeguy View Post
The other nice thing about a helmet mirror is that it is located roughly 3.5" from my eye, and the one I use is a little over 1" in diameter. Using basic trig, that tells me that it provides a 16 degree field of view. With a handlebar mirror located 36 inches away from your eye (and probably more), you would need a 5 inch diameter mirror to get the same field of view.
Even better, slightly turning your head allows you to scan everything behind you.
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Old 07-25-16, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by steelbikeguy View Post
The nice thing about helmet mirrors is that you should be normally looking forward, where most of the traffic issues are. With your helmet mirror set up properly, it will be showing you what is directly behind you. If this isn't the case, the mirror needs to be adjusted.

The other nice thing about a helmet mirror is that it is located roughly 3.5" from my eye, and the one I use is a little over 1" in diameter. Using basic trig, that tells me that it provides a 16 degree field of view. With a handlebar mirror located 36 inches away from your eye (and probably more), you would need a 5 inch diameter mirror to get the same field of view.

I've had friends that initially had difficulty with helmet mirrors, but with time, were able to adapt to them.


Steve in Peoria
Hi Steve!

I agree that you should have your attention focused in front of you. And for that matter, you should take as little attention away from what is in front of you for as little time as possible- the helmet mirror shows what is behind your helmet, and what is behind your helmet is dependent on what direction your helmet is facing. There's an incredible range of angles at which your head will be facing "forward" but only a small range that will put the mirror where you want it. You need to find the mirror, find where your field of view is, process that, adjust your helmet (head) and process the information and take action. Instead of glance down to where you know the mirror is, and where it's pointed.

Isn't what determines the field of view the convexity of the mirror? Any mathematical formula for distance to the mirror and size of the mirror depends on the convexity of the mirror to relay the field of view. (hence the 'objects in mirrors are closer than they appear' stickers on some mirrors) I've had 2 different mirrors- I think it was a Third Eye, that kind of stuck on to the helmet (and promptly fell off), and a "Take A Look" that clips on to a glasses arm or helmet visor... Both had similar fields of vision, but again, the same principle applies to the direction of your head.

I can understand someone not wanting a big ol mirror dangling off their bike- especially a 'racing' bike- it makes sense to find a different solution. And I totally understand how a user can reduce the effort in performing a complicated task sequence by familiarity.

In this case, I'm looking a reasonably sized mirror that doesn't interfere with braking or shifting. It seems the only option to get my preferred style and location of the mirror is to change back to non-aero levers. (which I might do *just* as a stylistic consideration) Out of the options that I'm seeing available- none mount to where I want them to mount, but that Selle Italia Eyelink that @chewybrian linked to is really effing nifty... I do also like the Blackburn mirror that @rickrob linked to.
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Old 07-25-16, 08:28 AM
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
That is about the cat's pyjamas! But it's a little more expensive than a pair of pyjamas for a cat... yow.

But outrageously cool! Thank you!


EDIT: it seems there's a HUGE range of prices for these- some at half the price I originally saw.
Let me tell you about the price thing...

I am building a bike from scratch and currently buying whatever parts I like from wherever, and pricing is a JOKE!

I've found the same exact item for double or half price time after time. I've just started googling every part before purchase, and through the whole build, I'm sure I've saved several hundred dollars.

Example:Nitto Noodle bars, the big boy wide version,

$139:

Nitto No. 177 Noodle bar 46/48cm

$93:

https://www.bikeparts.com/BPC323301/...m-width-silver

$59:

Nitto Noodle 177 Heat Treated Handlebar 48cm 26 0mm Bar Clamp 140mm Drop Silver | eBay

^That is not a case of similar items; it is the exact same thing! Same issue with most items...

It's not a case of some sites being overpriced. Most of them give you decent prices on some things, and rip-offs on others. Buyer beware, I guess, but you would think enough people would know how to google that they could not get away with it.

I'm willing to show a little loyalty to a shop that helps me

(Shout out to Starmichael at Norther Cycles in Portland, who gave me lots of help and got a lot of my business at fair prices).
https://www.northercycles.com/shop/2e...93qgprcpu2ey8p

But some of these guys, more than double for the exact same thing...

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Old 07-25-16, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
If I chose to use a mirror it would be the end-plug type. They are convex wide angle. That would be my first try at it.

[IMG][/IMG]
I have one of these on my Jamis and I like it. It blends in without looking like an appendage. The field of view is not large, but it is enough to let me know something is coming, as long as I remember to glance down periodically. It is just a ball in a rubber socket, so it needs readjusted after I hit a large bump.

I also have a Cat Eye bar end mirror. It is large and, since it is an actual glass mirror, has a very clear view. It is also very stable. It may not work so well to see past your legs if you have narrow bars.

I have a couple others that are mounted on arms away from the bars, but they vibrate more than I like.
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Old 07-25-16, 09:26 AM
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
Hi Steve!

I agree that you should have your attention focused in front of you. And for that matter, you should take as little attention away from what is in front of you for as little time as possible- the helmet mirror shows what is behind your helmet, and what is behind your helmet is dependent on what direction your helmet is facing. There's an incredible range of angles at which your head will be facing "forward" but only a small range that will put the mirror where you want it. You need to find the mirror, find where your field of view is, process that, adjust your helmet (head) and process the information and take action. Instead of glance down to where you know the mirror is, and where it's pointed.
I suppose everyone's experience is different. My head seems to be in a pretty consistent position while riding. A quick flick of the eye to the upper left lets me see my rear view mirror, which shows me the road behind me. It works quite well for me. No change in head position during the process, although I can scan left and right if I want to see to the sides behind me.

Don't handlebar mirrors also require a consistent head position (although not a consistent pitch, roll or yaw angle)? i.e. if the mirror is adjusted correctly for riding on the hoods, wouldn't it be incorrect if you were on the top of the bars or in the drops?


Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
Isn't what determines the field of view the convexity of the mirror? Any mathematical formula for distance to the mirror and size of the mirror depends on the convexity of the mirror to relay the field of view. (hence the 'objects in mirrors are closer than they appear' stickers on some mirrors) I've had 2 different mirrors- I think it was a Third Eye, that kind of stuck on to the helmet (and promptly fell off), and a "Take A Look" that clips on to a glasses arm or helmet visor... Both had similar fields of vision, but again, the same principle applies to the direction of your head.
I'm assuming a flat mirror.

A convex mirror will produce a wider field of view, but make the image proportionally smaller.


Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
I can understand someone not wanting a big ol mirror dangling off their bike- especially a 'racing' bike- it makes sense to find a different solution. And I totally understand how a user can reduce the effort in performing a complicated task sequence by familiarity.
I started using an eyeglass mounted mirror when riding on busy roads (back in 1978). It didn't take me any time at all to set up or get used to it. I found it very helpful for letting me take a brief glance at the traffic behind me in a fraction of a second.

More recently, I started riding recumbents, where a mirror is essential, so I'm familiar with the arguments for bike mounted mirrors, and a lot of people use them.

I have seen people struggle with setting up helmet mirrors, though, and that can be a hurdle to adapting to them. Chuck Harris was a fellow who sold a lot of helmet mirrors, and he had a nifty process of helping people adjust their mirrors. I wonder if I still have a copy of his printed instructions somewhere? Well, the essence was that when well adjusted, you should be able to look forward and glance up and to the left where the mirror will be positioned. When looking into the mirror, it should be adjusted so that you just see the edge of your ear.

Chuck has passed away, but HubBub Cycles sells a modern interpretation of his design. The mirror is a bit larger than what I bought from Chuck, but I use it for the helmet I wear on recumbents. The head position on the 'bents is more upright than regular bikes, so the mirror is adjusted accordingly. It's very well made. https://hubbubonline.com/?prod=helmir


Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
In this case, I'm looking a reasonably sized mirror that doesn't interfere with braking or shifting. It seems the only option to get my preferred style and location of the mirror is to change back to non-aero levers. (which I might do *just* as a stylistic consideration) Out of the options that I'm seeing available- none mount to where I want them to mount, but that Selle Italia Eyelink that @chewybrian linked to is really effing nifty... I do also like the Blackburn mirror that @rickrob linked to.
You might poke around some of the recumbent shops and forums. As heavy users of mirrors, they might have some lesser known products. One larger 'bent shop is the Hostel Shoppe... they show a few, including some that mount with brackets. Search - Hostel Shoppe

good luck!

Steve in Peoria
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Old 07-25-16, 09:31 AM
  #24  
rumrunn6
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moved my "take-a-look" from my helmet to my sunglasses due to suggestions here. it brings it closer to my eye giving me a bigger picture and it seems more stable. I also seem to be able to use it in the drops where-as before, on the helmet I couldn't get it adjusted good for hoods and drops. still getting used to it
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Old 07-25-16, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by vtchuck View Post
I bought a Safe Zone Helmet Mirror from Amazon a few years back. It has a huge 2.5" mirror and is very sturdy.

Looks dorky, but give you a clear wide range view.
That looks very close to or might be the mirror that Brett at Portland's Bike Gallery developed. While he was developing that, I was using the much smaller 3rd Eye mirrors that clamp onto the helmet visor but making a little bracket that screwed onto the visor. The much smaller mirror much closer to the eye gives almost the same field of vision and is far less clumsy to wear. Gets knocked out of kilter far less often. I had each on identical helmets and always grabbed mine.

I make my brackets by bending some 8 mil aluminum sheet to fit the visor, fiberglass both sides with light cloth and epoxy resin, then bolt onto the visor with very small screws, nuts and lockwashers. Mirror sits exactly where it should be with no fussing at all. Now, why the helmet companies and the mirror companies cannot come up with a standard so anyone could just buy such a bracket for say $5 instead of having to custom make it is completely beyond me.

Edited for some significant typos

Ben

Last edited by 79pmooney; 07-25-16 at 10:06 AM.
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