Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Fix up my Univega Viva Sport or buy new?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Fix up my Univega Viva Sport or buy new?

Old 08-04-18, 09:41 PM
  #1  
Johnicycle
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Fix up my Univega Viva Sport or buy new?

Hey y'all,
I've got this Univega Viva Sport that I've been riding. The bike is in pretty good shape. I need a new rare wheel and it could use a good tuning. I've been thinking about purchasing a new bicycle, but after reading somesof the threads here, I'm not sure if I'd be better off investing money into the Univega instead, or buying new. Anyone have experience with these bikes? Thoughts?

I'm not able to upload photos yet, apparently I need ten posts before I can do that.
Johnicycle is offline  
Old 08-04-18, 10:03 PM
  #2  
Colnago Mixte
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Center of Central CA
Posts: 1,671
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 897 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Is is something like this one? I believe this is 1986 catalog. They were always a middle range model, but if it fits you and you like riding it, it ought to be worth some new tires and cables, that's well under $100.
Attached Images
File Type: png
univega viva.png (1.54 MB, 139 views)
Colnago Mixte is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 05:57 AM
  #3  
Johnicycle
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Colnago Mixte View Post
Is is something like this one? I believe this is 1986 catalog. They were always a middle range model, but if it fits you and you like riding it, it ought to be worth some new tires and cables, that's well under $100.
Yes, it looks pretty identical to that one, except it's gray. I tried uploading a photo, but apparently I can't until I have posted here 10 times.

I bought new tires for it last year, so they're still relatively new. My rear rim warped on me my last ride out. I think it was the original and just had enough and through in the towel lol.

I do like the bicycle, but I was wondering if there's any advantage to purchasing a new bike; would it "feel" any different? Would it ride better?

I apologise if these questions sound stupid, but I havent enough experience on different bikes to know if these questions make any sense.

Thank you for your advice!

Last edited by Johnicycle; 08-05-18 at 05:58 AM. Reason: Typo
Johnicycle is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 06:43 AM
  #4  
Johnicycle
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post


There we go...
Johnicycle is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 06:47 AM
  #5  
Colnago Mixte
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Center of Central CA
Posts: 1,671
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 897 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Heck yeah I would definitely restore that bike back to good mechanical order, it looks practically new.

That's a nice one. Do you know what the frame tubing is?

May be a little tall for you though, if that's where you are running your seat height.
Colnago Mixte is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 06:49 AM
  #6  
Cougrrcj 
Over forty victim of Fate
 
Cougrrcj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 3,666

Bikes: A few...

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 530 Post(s)
Liked 260 Times in 176 Posts
Univegas of that era used frames made by Miyata, so all you need to do is look at T-Mar's excellent post Asian Serial Number Guide to determine the year. Frame and fork material were improved throughout the years.

As you can see by my signature line, I have two Univegas and one Miyata. Great riding bikes! I bought a new wheelset for my Viva Sport from Velomine Sun M13 27 inch silver rims 5,6,7 speed freewheel hubs wheelset Sun M13 27 inch polished silver rims freewheel hubs wheelset 36h [640329] - $105.00 Velomine.com : Worldwide Bicycle Shop, fixed gear track bike wheelsets campagnolo super record vintage for ~$110 that feature sealed bearing hubs, stainless spokes, and narrow polished Sun M13II rims.

A properly tensioned wheelset makes all the difference in the world to a bike's 'feel'. With those new wheels, and some other component changes, I have my Viva Sport down to 24.1 pounds - even with heavy Panaracer Pasela TG tires! It 'rides' very similar to my Miyata 710 that weighs less...
__________________
'75 Fuji S-10S bought new, 52k+ miles and still going!
'84 Univega Gran Tourismo
'84 Univega Viva Sport
'86 Miyata 710
'90 Schwinn Woodlands
Unknown brand MTB of questionable lineage aka 'Mutt Trail Bike'
Plus or minus a few others from time-to-time

Cougrrcj is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 06:56 AM
  #7  
Colnago Mixte
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Center of Central CA
Posts: 1,671
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 897 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
I have a very similar 1986 Univega Gran Rally I stripped down to bare metal that is currently at the powdercoaters. Definitely worth saving.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
gran rally 2.jpg (134.3 KB, 121 views)
File Type: jpg
SCN16.jpg (677.5 KB, 116 views)
Colnago Mixte is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 07:12 AM
  #8  
randyjawa 
Senior Member
 
randyjawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada - burrrrr!
Posts: 10,627

Bikes: 1958 Rabeneick 120D, 1968 Legnano Gran Premio, 196? Torpado Professional, 2000 Marinoni Piuma

Mentioned: 182 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1038 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 774 Times in 477 Posts
Depending on what new bicycle you choose, you can bet your boots that it will be easier to use. Handlebar mounted indexed shifting, as opposed to friction or even indexed down tube shifters. Brakes of today are greatly superior, in function, than yesteryear. As for ride quality or would you enjoy the ride, that I cannot comment on.

As for me, I have owned, built up and ridden both vintage road bicycles, mountain bicycles and even a roadster, or two. I opt for the vintage road bicycle ride quality every time. However, when it comes to the bike that is easiest to use - for me, and best to ride - for me, my newer Cyclops is the winner, by far, and it is fitted with mostly new school, easy to use stuff...


I also upgraded this early eighties Bianchi, installing indexed bar end shifters, appropriate derailleurs, eight speed chain, and aero light pull levers. This was a relatively inexpensive upgrade, except for the wheel set, which set me back close to three hundred dollars, and I built the wheels myself...


In the OP's case, I would keep the Univega as original as possible, until a later date, and then get a new bike to ride. Any decision to keep the new one and sell the old one, or visa versa, can be addressed when the need arises.

And that is how N+1 starts:-(
__________________
"98% of the bikes I buy are projects".
randyjawa is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 07:12 AM
  #9  
jamesdak 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Utah
Posts: 6,550

Bikes: Too many to keep this current.

Mentioned: 117 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1600 Post(s)
Liked 970 Times in 498 Posts
I'm with the others, it looks great. Sort it out and start using it!
__________________
Steel is real...and comfy.
jamesdak is online now  
Old 08-05-18, 07:22 AM
  #10  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 20,332

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 948 Post(s)
Liked 334 Times in 250 Posts
There is absolutely nothing wrong with non-indexed shifting. If you don't like reaching toward the downtube, barcons offer a superb alternative.

There is nothing inherently wrong with the brakes on older bikes. Aerodynamic cable routing does increase your leverage / braking force by about 10 to 15 percent, but the real difference is in modern cable housings and pads, both of which are cheaply and easily retrofitted to older bikes. (Been there ... done that numerous times.)
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 08:57 AM
  #11  
Johnicycle
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Colnago Mixte View Post
Heck yeah I would definitely restore that bike back to good mechanical order, it looks practically new.

That's a nice one. Do you know what the frame tubing is?

May be a little tall for you though, if that's where you are running your seat height.
I had been riding it quite often until the rear wheel called it quits on me a few weeks ago. I reached 37 mph going down a hill, I don't if that had anything to do with it, or if it was just coincidence that it crapped out.

I'm 6' 2", I feel it's a good size for me; I feel comfortable on it.

I don't know much about the bike (I don't know what the frame tubing is), as it was given to me by my neighbor where I used to live. But reading some of these responses, I'm intrigued, and I want to learn more about the bike.
Johnicycle is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 08:58 AM
  #12  
Johnicycle
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Colnago Mixte View Post
I have a very similar 1986 Univega Gran Rally I stripped down to bare metal that is currently at the powdercoaters. Definitely worth saving.
Very cool. I'd love to see it when it's completed!
Johnicycle is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 09:03 AM
  #13  
Johnicycle
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by randyjawa View Post
Depending on what new bicycle you choose, you can bet your boots that it will be easier to use. Handlebar mounted indexed shifting, as opposed to friction or even indexed down tube shifters. Brakes of today are greatly superior, in function, than yesteryear. As for ride quality or would you enjoy the ride, that I cannot comment on.

As for me, I have owned, built up and ridden both vintage road bicycles, mountain bicycles and even a roadster, or two. I opt for the vintage road bicycle ride quality every time. However, when it comes to the bike that is easiest to use - for me, and best to ride - for me, my newer Cyclops is the winner, by far, and it is fitted with mostly new school, easy to use stuff...


I also upgraded this early eighties Bianchi, installing indexed bar end shifters, appropriate derailleurs, eight speed chain, and aero light pull levers. This was a relatively inexpensive upgrade, except for the wheel set, which set me back close to three hundred dollars, and I built the wheels myself...


In the OP's case, I would keep the Univega as original as possible, until a later date, and then get a new bike to ride. Any decision to keep the new one and sell the old one, or visa versa, can be addressed when the need arises.

And that is how N+1 starts:-(
Originally Posted by jamesdak View Post
I'm with the others, it looks great. Sort it out and start using it!
Originally Posted by John E View Post
There is absolutely nothing wrong with non-indexed shifting. If you don't like reaching toward the downtube, barcons offer a superb alternative.

There is nothing inherently wrong with the brakes on older bikes. Aerodynamic cable routing does increase your leverage / braking force by about 10 to 15 percent, but the real difference is in modern cable housings and pads, both of which are cheaply and easily retrofitted to older bikes. (Been there ... done that numerous times.)
Thanks for the input, guys. I appreciate it. I think you all have got me convinced to toss a few bucks into it the Univega.
Johnicycle is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 09:27 AM
  #14  
Colnago Mixte
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Center of Central CA
Posts: 1,671
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 897 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by Johnicycle View Post
Very cool. I'd love to see it when it's completed!
Will post pics when it's finished. I'm having it done in "clear" so you can see all the brazing and burn marks and stuff.

Some of the old Univega catalogs are posted online, they can be a hoot. I linked the one from 1984 below.

They list the original components and technical specs, which can be useful to know.

https://univegacatalogs.wordpress.com/1984-2/
Attached Images
File Type: png
uni catalog.png (1.66 MB, 108 views)
Colnago Mixte is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 10:34 AM
  #15  
Johnicycle
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Colnago Mixte View Post
Will post pics when it's finished. I'm having it done in "clear" so you can see all the brazing and burn marks and stuff.

Some of the old Univega catalogs are posted online, they can be a hoot. I linked the one from 1984 below.

They list the original components and technical specs, which can be useful to know.

https://univegacatalogs.wordpress.com/1984-2/
Haha.. thank you!
I'll take the one second from the left.. lol
Johnicycle is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 03:09 PM
  #16  
randyjawa 
Senior Member
 
randyjawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada - burrrrr!
Posts: 10,627

Bikes: 1958 Rabeneick 120D, 1968 Legnano Gran Premio, 196? Torpado Professional, 2000 Marinoni Piuma

Mentioned: 182 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1038 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 774 Times in 477 Posts
I'll take the one second from the left.. lol
Not me, I isn't fussy on turkey levers!-)
__________________
"98% of the bikes I buy are projects".
randyjawa is offline  
Old 08-05-18, 04:32 PM
  #17  
Chukbacca
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 97

Bikes: 1988 Univega Alpina Pro

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Cougrrcj View Post
Univegas of that era used frames made by Miyata, so all you need to do is look at T-Mar's excellent post Asian Serial Number Guide to determine the year. Frame and fork material were improved throughout the years.

As you can see by my signature line, I have two Univegas and one Miyata. Great riding bikes! I bought a new wheelset for my Viva Sport from Velomine Sun M13 27 inch silver rims 5,6,7 speed freewheel hubs wheelset Sun M13 27 inch polished silver rims freewheel hubs wheelset 36h [640329] - $105.00 Velomine.com : Worldwide Bicycle Shop, fixed gear track bike wheelsets campagnolo super record vintage for ~$110 that feature sealed bearing hubs, stainless spokes, and narrow polished Sun M13II rims.

A properly tensioned wheelset makes all the difference in the world to a bike's 'feel'. With those new wheels, and some other component changes, I have my Viva Sport down to 24.1 pounds - even with heavy Panaracer Pasela TG tires! It 'rides' very similar to my Miyata 710 that weighs less...
I might need to pick me up a set of those rims. A buddy gave me a viva sport with sew-ons? tubulars? whatever, I don't want to deal with them.
Chukbacca is offline  
Old 08-07-18, 04:43 PM
  #18  
Cougrrcj 
Over forty victim of Fate
 
Cougrrcj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 3,666

Bikes: A few...

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 530 Post(s)
Liked 260 Times in 176 Posts
A couple of gratuitous pics of my '84 Viva sport, in the midst of refurb a couple of years ago -- with the Sun M13II wheels...





On addition to changing the wheelset, I opted to go with aero brake levers, Tektro dual-pivot 539 brakes, VO pedals, 1st gen Cyclone derailleurs, SunTour barcons...
__________________
'75 Fuji S-10S bought new, 52k+ miles and still going!
'84 Univega Gran Tourismo
'84 Univega Viva Sport
'86 Miyata 710
'90 Schwinn Woodlands
Unknown brand MTB of questionable lineage aka 'Mutt Trail Bike'
Plus or minus a few others from time-to-time

Cougrrcj is offline  
Old 08-07-18, 08:22 PM
  #19  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 12,405

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 97 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5149 Post(s)
Liked 2,446 Times in 1,428 Posts
Originally Posted by Johnicycle View Post
Hey y'all,
I've got this Univega Viva Sport that I've been riding. The bike is in pretty good shape. I need a new rare wheel and it could use a good tuning. I've been thinking about purchasing a new bicycle, but after reading somesof the threads here, I'm not sure if I'd be better off investing money into the Univega instead, or buying new. Anyone have experience with these bikes? Thoughts?

I'm not able to upload photos yet, apparently I need ten posts before I can do that.
not sure how much $ you would spend on a new road bike, but you could almost for sure improve your Univega for less than you would spend on a new bike and it would most likely be better quality.
whether your new bike budget would be $300, $500, $700, etc- updating the Univega will make it nicer most likely for less.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 08-08-18, 05:34 PM
  #20  
Johnicycle
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
not sure how much $ you would spend on a new road bike, but you could almost for sure improve your Univega for less than you would spend on a new bike and it would most likely be better quality.
whether your new bike budget would be $300, $500, $700, etc- updating the Univega will make it nicer most likely for less.
Any suggestions on what to update upgrade on it? I put it in today for a tune-up, and wheel repair. I looked a little more closely, and found a spoke had broke, thus the rim warping. So the spoke will be replaced instead of the wheel. I'm also having them swap out the pedals, because the ones on there now are for bike shoes, which I don't own, and prefer not to have at this point.

I asked the shop to give it a once over and let me know if there's anything else that it would need. I asked them to contact me before any additional repairs for approval.
Johnicycle is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Peteroo
Classic & Vintage
1
08-01-15 06:56 PM
Pamestique
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
0
06-11-13 01:17 PM
edgamar
Road Cycling
12
05-14-13 12:59 PM
justcruzin
Classic & Vintage
5
06-04-12 01:14 PM
Hydrotim
Road Cycling
6
08-06-10 11:04 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.