Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Recommend a 27 x 1 1/4 tire for straight-sided rim?

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Recommend a 27 x 1 1/4 tire for straight-sided rim?

Reply

Old 09-20-18, 03:11 AM
  #1  
duffer1960
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Milwaukee
Posts: 526

Bikes: Fred cycles

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Recommend a 27 x 1 1/4 tire for straight-sided rim?

I have an old Schwinn LeTour with hookless steel rims. I'd like to buy good 27 x 1 1/4 tires for it, but I understand some are better at staying put on hookless rims than others.
Criteria in order of importance for me:

1. 27 x 1 1/4. I'm 210 lbs, need the wider tire.
2. Stays put at 85-90 psi on a straight-sided rim. I'm 210 lbs, need the higher pressure.
3. Reasonable flat resistance. (Better than the stock tires I rode on in the 70s at any rate.)
And, Low rolling resistance, Good ride, etc., if possible.
Good life in indoor storage.
Not necessary for a long-wearing tread. I don't put many miles on this bike.

And with Niagara Cycle Works out of business, what mail order house is good for these, or for a variety of reasonable price parts for older bikes?

Thanks....

Last edited by duffer1960; 09-20-18 at 03:18 AM.
duffer1960 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-18, 03:33 AM
  #2  
sloar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Elwood Indiana
Posts: 6,046

Bikes: they change so much I'm tired of updating this

Mentioned: 110 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 713 Post(s)
I think Panaracer Paselas are the best 27” tire.
sloar is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-18, 04:01 AM
  #3  
bwilli88 
Senior Member
 
bwilli88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kampong Cham, Cambodia but I have too much in Lancaster, PA
Posts: 1,650

Bikes: Bikes in USA; 73 Raleigh Supercourse dingle speed, 74 Raleigh Grand Prix SS, 78 Raleigh Supercourse, 83 Centurion Pro-Tour

Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 379 Post(s)
I have some 27 1 3/8 tires in my basement in the States. They work well on a few of my bikes here in Cambodia and I weigh 240. I normally run them around 65psi front and rear. They have a nice cushy ride and last a good while.
Let me know if you want some. I think I shipped 4 in a big priority box for 18.55 and $5 a tire.
__________________
My Cambodia bikes;1981 Centurion Pro Tour, 1985 Gazelle Mens Market bike, 19?? Maxwell Allroad, 2012 Fuji Stratos.
bwilli88 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-18, 04:01 AM
  #4  
FBOATSB 
Senior Member
 
FBOATSB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 1,465

Bikes: Old Schwinns for now

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 525 Post(s)
+1 to Panaracer. However I returned to bikes at 350 pounds, now below 300. On 27" straight wall rims I have never needed more than 70 psi to carry me and a forty pound bike on rock hard tires, 1 1/4" or less. As long as they have wire beads, I've never had a problem.
FBOATSB is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-18, 04:37 AM
  #5  
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,934
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 808 Post(s)
If you’re worried about blow-offs, you can fit regular 700C-sized tubulars to your 630 mm rims.
dabac is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-18, 07:46 AM
  #6  
FBOATSB 
Senior Member
 
FBOATSB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 1,465

Bikes: Old Schwinns for now

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 525 Post(s)
Originally Posted by duffer1960 View Post

And with Niagara Cycle Works out of business, what mail order house is good for these, or for a variety of reasonable price parts for older bikes?

Thanks....
biketiresdirect has your tires, among others.
biketiresdirect
FBOATSB is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-18, 07:56 AM
  #7  
Jon T
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: West Orange County, CA
Posts: 849

Bikes: '84 Peugeot PH10LE

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 294 Post(s)
I'm using Kenda 27x1 1/4 skin wall tires on my Rigida hookless rims on my '84 Peugeot. 90 psi. I've had them 2 years and so far, no problems.
Jon
Jon T is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-18, 08:44 AM
  #8  
TrboDieselPwrd 
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 25

Bikes: '77 Motobecane Grand Touring

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Yet another endorsement for the Paselas. I've got 27 x 1 1/4" skin walls on straight sided alloy Rigidas and so far no issues.
TrboDieselPwrd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-18, 09:43 AM
  #9  
Ironfish653
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Virginia Beach
Posts: 811

Bikes: 1997 Cannondale, 1976 Bridgestone, 1998 Softride

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 261 Post(s)
If you don't mind a blackwall, the Performance Strada is a good budget buy. They're a little stiffer than the Paselas, but still ride pretty well. Better on wet pavement and gravel paths than something with that little tread should be.
I have found that i have to keep them above 70psi, or they can slip on the rim during high efforts (climbs / sprint)
Ironfish653 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-18, 06:15 PM
  #10  
top506
Death fork? Naaaah!!
 
top506's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: The other Maine, north of RT 2
Posts: 4,508

Bikes: '71 Gitane Super Corsa, '73 Atala Giro d'Italia, '73 Schwinn Super Sport, '76 Viscount Aerospace Pro, '81 Miyata 710, '84 Ross Signature 290s, '85 Miele Gara, '87 Miyata 512, '89 Centurion Ironman, many more

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 254 Post(s)
Originally Posted by sloar View Post
I think Panaracer Paselas are the best 27” tire.
And I've used them on straight-wall Schwinn/Weinmann rims at 80-85PSI. I'm 165lbs, but the weight of the '73 Super Sport makes up for that.

Top
__________________
You know it's going to be a good day when the stem and seatpost come right out.

(looking for a picture and not seeing it? Thank the Photobucket fiasco.PM me and I'll link it up.)
top506 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-18, 07:26 PM
  #11  
oddjob2
Still learning
 
oddjob2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: North of Canada, Adirondacks, NNJ
Posts: 11,559

Bikes: Too many

Mentioned: 85 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 812 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Jon T View Post
I'm using Kenda 27x1 1/4 skin wall tires on my Rigida hookless rims on my '84 Peugeot. 90 psi. I've had them 2 years and so far, no problems.
Jon
+1 Hard to beat for a beater Schwinn. They stay on a hookless rim better than the Panaracer. Available via Amazon.
oddjob2 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-18, 03:41 PM
  #12  
duffer1960
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Milwaukee
Posts: 526

Bikes: Fred cycles

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Yep, I may go with the cheapo Kenda gumwall look-alikes, 'HIGH PRESSURE'. That's what's been on there for the last 10 years, and they still look like new aside from the rear getting a little thin. The ride & rolling resistance are OK, especially considering the price. Longevity & flat resistance has been ok. These were hard to seat when new so that they would ride w/o a dip, but they stretched out after some time. Thank you all for the advice.
duffer1960 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-18, 04:32 PM
  #13  
palincss
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 327
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 145 Post(s)
Originally Posted by duffer1960 View Post
I have an old Schwinn LeTour with hookless steel rims. I'd like to buy good 27 x 1 1/4 tires for it, but I understand some are better at staying put on hookless rims than others.
Criteria in order of importance for me:

1. 27 x 1 1/4. I'm 210 lbs, need the wider tire.
2. Stays put at 85-90 psi on a straight-sided rim. I'm 210 lbs, need the higher pressure.
1 1/4" is 32mm wide. I weigh only 4 lb less than you and run my 700x32C tires at 70 psi. You don't need 85-90 unless you're carrying a huge camping load. Basically the best answer to "what 27 x 1 1/4 inch tire" is the Pasela.
palincss is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-18, 04:40 PM
  #14  
palincss
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 327
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 145 Post(s)
Originally Posted by dabac View Post
If you’re worried about blow-offs, you can fit regular 700C-sized tubulars to your 630 mm rims.
Since tubular rims have a different profile rim from clincher rims and tubular tires don't fit on clincher rims, and since 700C is 622 bead seat diameter vs 630mm for 27 x 1 1/4", how would you go about doing that?
palincss is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-18, 05:15 PM
  #15  
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 13,868

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 659 Post(s)
Along the blackwall lines, I have a pair of Specialized Road Sport 27 x 1 ¼ on my Dunlop Special Lightweight rims. I haven't ridden them yet, but they fit the rims beautifully and look good at a sidewall-rated 90 psi. Worth a look!

Regarding fear of blowoffs: From the 1930s through the 1950s, Raleigh, Rudge, and Humber produced bikes with these rims and wired-on tires by Dunlop, John Bull, and others. Examples of these bikes are the 1952 Raleigh Super Lenton, the 1952 Rudge Aero Special, and an identical Humber to complete the identical triplet.

The bikes were ridden on nearly 1000 mile runs like Lands' End to John O'Groats in record attempts, by factory-sponsored professionals and by enterprising amateurs (I can do that, all I have to do is keep pedaling!). I can't believe they used pressures lower than the rated nominal 90 psi. If they had blowoffs with any frequency, the design would have been changed, since these runs and records were key to Raleigh's sales. It was race on Sunday, rake in the cash on Monday. Blowoffs could not be tolerated.

With Paselas or this Specialized, I don't think there is any risk of blowoffs with rims and beads in good condition.

I don't have any experience with the Kendas to make a comparison.

Last edited by Road Fan; 09-21-18 at 05:21 PM.
Road Fan is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-18, 05:18 PM
  #16  
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 13,868

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 659 Post(s)
Originally Posted by palincss View Post
Since tubular rims have a different profile rim from clincher rims and tubular tires don't fit on clincher rims, and since 700C is 622 bead seat diameter vs 630mm for 27 x 1 1/4", how would you go about doing that?
I agree with Palincsars on the tubular substitution matter - they are not designed for 27 x 1 ¼ rims. The bed of the rim is not suitable to glue the tubular and the act of stretching the tubular to slip over the rim edges, if more severe than normal stretching, is likely to weaken the threads in the carcass with the possibiity of premature blowouts and rather dangerous flatting.
Road Fan is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-18, 01:41 AM
  #17  
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,934
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 808 Post(s)

Originally Posted by palincss View Post
Since.... tubular tires don't fit on clincher rims...
What makes you so certain that they don’t, have you tried it?
I have, I commuted on a bike set up like that a full summer.
They’re not meant to, I give you that. But it works.
Originally Posted by palincss View Post
..how would you go about doing that?
Easily, for those rims I had access to.
Originally Posted by palincss View Post
Since tubular rims have a different profile rim from clincher rims...
Well, a tubular tire expects to sit in a shallow trough.
IME, it doesn’t appear to be particularly inconvenienced by being mounted in a deeper trough.
I wouldn’t like to try clincher tire on tubular rim though.
Originally Posted by palincss View Post
Since ..700C is 622 bead seat diameter vs 630mm for 27 x 1 1/4"...
This is what makes it work. 700C rims have the brake track at the same diameter regardless of being tubulars or clinchers. The bottom of the trough has a bigger diameter for the tubulars.
630 mm clinchers have a greater brake track diameter than the 700C, so the bottom of the trough tends to end up pretty darn close to the diameter at the trough of a 700C tubular.

I did have two issues though. The 630 mm wheels I used most looked a bit like the
https://www.skywaywheels.com/ and these had a really deep trough. With the tubulars I had - 23 mm - the tire became very recessed into the rim. Pinch flatting became a risk.
I also tore the valve stem on one tire as the tire slid on the rim.
The sliding was easily dealt with by adding some double-sided sticky tape to the inside of the rim.
Not enough tire protrusion could have been solved by either a wider tire, filling up the trough(which probably would have fixed the sliding too) or simply by using a more traditional metal rim w/o that unusually deep trough.
dabac is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-18, 01:13 PM
  #18  
dddd
Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race
 
dddd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Northern California
Posts: 6,309

Bikes: Cheltenham-Pederson racer, Boulder F/S Paris-Roubaix, Varsity racer, '52 Christophe, '62 Continental, '92 Merckx, '75 Limongi, '76 Presto, '72 Gitane SC, '71 Schwinn SS, etc.

Mentioned: 59 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 445 Post(s)
I wouldn't recommend using a tubular tire on a clincher rim unless perhaps it was an emergency.
You'd be getting pretty much the worst features of both types at the same time, but still saddled with the heavy rim and impracticality of puncture repair.
I've used clincher rims to stretch tubular tires though so I know the tires fit, and there was an albeit very heavy "Mixte" rim produced which was made for both tire types to be fitted. Again though, it brought forth few of the advantages of either system and was obviously optimized for neither.
dddd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-18, 05:05 AM
  #19  
duffer1960
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Milwaukee
Posts: 526

Bikes: Fred cycles

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Why I'm shying away from the Panaracer Pacela Tourguards. Several Amazon reviews say the sidewalls are weak, that they deteriorate and fail in the weather or maybe even indoors. I bought a set some years ago for a bike for my niece. I recall seeing the bike some years later and being negatively impressed at the condition of the tires. And, they didn't appear to be very flat resistant, and I think some reviewers commented on that. Good ride, yes. But without reasonable flat resistance and longevity, no go.
duffer1960 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-18, 06:20 AM
  #20  
Salamandrine 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 4,610

Bikes: 78 Masi Criterium, 68 PX10, 2016 Mercian King of Mercia, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr

Mentioned: 98 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1587 Post(s)
I'd take the amazon reviews with a grain of salt. I read those too before I bought some, and they have over 5000 miles on them now, including inappropriate trail riding. The kevlar belt stuff helps with glass cuts, but if you run over a nail, you're going to flat. Mine held up pretty well. Paselas are relatively light tires, so if you're looking for a rugged commuter or something, they aren't the best choice. Schwalbe and Continental are options.

Any tire can potentially blow out if a brake pad is rubbing them, or they take a hit from a pothole edge or sharp rock, or they are run under pressure.
Salamandrine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-18, 10:14 AM
  #21  
Cougrrcj 
Over forty victim of Fate
 
Cougrrcj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 2,936

Bikes: A few...

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 281 Post(s)
Both the Bontrager T1 and T2 tires are available in 27x1-1/4. When I bought my Viva Sport a few years ago, it had a pair of Bontrager T1 tires on it, but in 27x1-1/8 on unhooked rims. That wheelset and tires got moved on to my Fuji S-10S. I had commuted on those tires for the next three years. BTW, I weigh in at right around 200 pounds, and ran them at 85psi front, 90psi rear.

That said, the Viva Sport got 27x1-1/8 Paselas PTs when it got a new wheelset in the refurbishment. My Univega Gran Tourismo (touring bike) got Paselas PTs in 27x1-1/4.
__________________
'75 Fuji S-10S bought new, 52k+ miles and still going!
'84 Univega Gran Tourismo
'84 Univega Viva Sport
'86 Miyata 710
'90 Schwinn Woodlands
Huffy MTB - for trips to corner store
MTB of questionable lineage aka 'Mutt Trail Bike'
Cougrrcj is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-18, 03:48 PM
  #22  
cannonride15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Hampton Roads
Posts: 69

Bikes: Cannondales: '85 ST400, '86 SR800, '87 SM600

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
If they will fit you might consider 27x13/8", more volume is a good thing. Personally I'm enjoying a nice ride with Continental Ultra Sport 27x11/4", measure 31mm on Wolber 19mm internal rims. Almost as wide as my touring bike's Nashbar Streetwise 700x35mm tires which measure only 32mm wide! This is quite typical, most of my 27x11/4" tires measure only 28 or 29mm.
cannonride15 is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service