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Hub sizes?

Old 05-15-19, 04:13 PM
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Mboy
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Hub sizes?

I have a fiori Modena that I bought in 1986, been using it as a commuter for the last 20 yrs, the rims are starting to wear through. Id like to restore it back to a road bike. Anyone know the hub spacing? Would I be able to use a more modern set of wheels/cassette (ie 8or 9 speed) etc., or should I look at rebuilding the wheels/looking for a more original 6 speed cassette that it used to have?
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Old 05-15-19, 05:45 PM
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Hub spacing will be 125mm if original. You will, probably have to spread the stays a wee bit (2.5mm each side). Then you will have to string the frame to ensure that you did not off center the stays when spreading. Then, you should check your drop alignment and finally, ensure that your derailleur hanger is not out of alignment.

That sounds like a lot and it is, but taken one step at a time it is not all that difficult. Have a look at Frame and Fork Preparation and some of the haze might clear a wee bit. Hope it is a help...
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Old 05-15-19, 06:01 PM
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P!N20
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Hi Mboy. 6 speed would likely be 126mm spacing. 8/9 speed is 130mm spacing.

You can get the frame 'cold set', basically bending the frame to accommodate 130mm rear spacing. It's not as bad as it sounds!

Sometimes you can just spread the rear triangle with your hands when you're installing the rear wheel. For instance, my Pinarello has 127mm rear spacing and I can get my 8 speed rear hub in and out without too much difficulty. YMMV.

Regarding 6 vs 8 or 9 speeds - it's up to you. I like 8 speed, for me it has a good range and was served by some pretty cool groupsets, but 6 speed will probably require less 'upgrading'.

You must be disappointed that you only got 20 years out of those rims.

Edit: beaten by randyjawa
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Old 05-16-19, 01:01 AM
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Mboy
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Thanks guys!
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Old 05-16-19, 06:52 AM
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Mboy, welcome to the forums. A circa 1986 Modena was an upper entry level model, bordering on mid-range. It should havea Light Action SIS derailleur system. If so, just be aware that if you go 8 or 9 speed, the derailleurs and shift levers will only function properly in their friction mode. If you want to retain indexed shifting you will also have to get compatible shift levers and rear derailleur, which can add substantially to the cost.

Regarding the cold setting process, the one suggestion I would offer is to forget using a 2 x 4 piece of lumber. This is overkill and cumbersome. Go to your local ice arena, where you'll find lots of broken wooden hockey sticks for free. The shafts make excellent levers for cold setting. They're sufficiently long and strong. They're far more manageable then a 2 x 4, especially when making fine adjustments. A Modena from this era would have hi-tensile stays, so they will be relatively easy to cold set from the current 126mm to the 30mm spacing required for 8 or 9 speed. While it's possible to simply spread the stays by hand, it is far better to cold set them, as it relieves stress in the stays and axle.

I'd appreciate if you could supply your Modena's serial number, either by posting it or sending me a Private Message. I have a fairly extensive serial number guide for Asian manufactured bicycles that I've compiled as a reference for forum members. While Fiori is an Italian styled Canadian bicycle, I suspect they were manufactured by Norco's standard Asian suppliers. Your serial number may allow me to confirm this and add Fiori to my guide. TIA.

Asian Serial Number Guide
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