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USA made components?

Old 10-31-19, 11:07 AM
  #26  
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Did Tom Ritchey make bullmoose bars for a while? Or were they outsourced?
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Old 10-31-19, 11:14 AM
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Onyx hubs made in Minnesnowta. Popular with mtbers but they do a road version.
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Old 10-31-19, 12:04 PM
  #28  
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Tires and chain would probably be the toughest to do if somebody wanted to mfg them here.. the other stuff- pedals, quills, etc, the metal stuff is just machining. Not terrible to do short run stuff if you really wanted to do it.

Maybe somebody like coker for tires, or diamond for the chain could do those.
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Old 10-31-19, 12:23 PM
  #29  
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Sweet parts were made in SoCal in the mid 90's, they had welded-steel cranks and stems that hit some very low weight numbers.

I had a pair of solid titanium cranks with svelte aluminum spider made by Sampson, which I sold on Ebay about 15 years ago. The two top bidders, from Japan and Germany, bought only titanium parts and cranksets, respectively. This was before buyer's and seller's transaction records were made more private than back then.

I bought 27.5"x i35mm rims from Spank a couple of years ago which I believe were made in the US. Highest quality, so not cheap.

Rim/wheel vendor FSE is in the US and makes their filament-wound rims in the US. Good pricing and very nice product!

One more thing that Chicago Schwinn made was front hubs.

I have a pair of stem shifters here with levers having Made in USA molded into the plastic levers.

Did anyone here mention Matthauser yet? They made complete brakesets iir.

I sold some Ciamillo calipers a while back that were made here in the US.
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Old 10-31-19, 12:51 PM
  #30  
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The thing I always come back to when thinking of this topic is drop bar levers. That's the only item of whichI have no evidence of any manufacturing having occurred in the US.
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Old 10-31-19, 10:37 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Johnnybikes View Post
This Mavic crankset is made in the USA
I don't THINK so: the chainring that's marked "made in USA" certainly but never heard of Mavic setting up shop in USA to make those cranks (or anything else in alloy)
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Old 10-31-19, 10:40 PM
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Aerolite, one of the early clipless pedal systems introduced in the 1980s to compete with Look and Cyclebinding, is still made in America today.
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Old 11-04-19, 01:14 PM
  #33  
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Direct to OP's query a Chicago Schwinn Paramount could be equipped with Schwinn cranks and hubs that were specifically made for Paramounts.

Going downscale a bit Chicago Schwinns used just lots of parts made in house. And cranks from Ashtabula, Ohio.
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Old 11-04-19, 01:35 PM
  #34  
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Paul Components made the Powerglide rear derailleur. Which was a very good derailleur and forced Shimano to improve the XTR. Came out in 1995 which was long past the era of Chicago Paramounts. Made in Chico, California.
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Old 11-04-19, 02:51 PM
  #35  
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I know SRAM is USA owned and I thought Zipp wheels were USA made. The rest a lot of people have caught. Kool Stop brake pads.
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Old 11-04-19, 03:31 PM
  #36  
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Touring and commuting geeks love Third Eye glass mirrors. I use the bar end mirrors on my BMW motorbike.
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Old 11-04-19, 04:13 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by jetboy View Post
Yeah I had some Avocet cranks but they were Ofmega (and awesome so thanks.. but). I do swear by my Avocet saddles- their touring series is the best. but not even sure they were really USA.

Like has anyone in the US ever even engineered and marketed a FD? I have no idea.. thus the ask.
-----

One U.S. produced front mech was the Excel -









The Retrogrouch: Excel & Elgin - American Derailleurs from Beatrice Foods

-----
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Old 11-04-19, 04:49 PM
  #38  
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Onyx hubs (made to order in St. Augusta, MN) are huge with BMX racers because of their instant engagement.

Road riders should love them because the freehub mechanism is absolutely silent, not to mention the silky smooth ceramic bearings and Onyx’s efforts to make hubs that are compatible with various other makers’ systems. Tons of color options and first class customer service.

https://onyxrp.com
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Old 11-04-19, 04:57 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by juvela View Post
-----...
One U.S. produced front mech was the Excel -...
-----
I'm pretty sure that my Made in USA plastic stem shift levers were part of this Excel ensemble.
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Old 11-04-19, 05:02 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by 63rickert View Post
Paul Components made the Powerglide rear derailleur. Which was a very good derailleur and forced Shimano to improve the XTR. Came out in 1995 which was long past the era of Chicago Paramounts. Made in Chico, California.
This is the first report I've heard of any of the CNC-produced, US-made derailers being any good at all, or at least in comparison to Shimano's lower-priced, albeit heavier, XTR components.

In terms of weight, Shimano must have been feeling the pressure at that time however, since their subsequent components from about '97 and onward showed pronounced weight-loss efforts in virtually all of their component's designs.
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Old 11-04-19, 05:30 PM
  #41  
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Paul's components were very interesting, in a cool, very high tech for the time, sort of way, but were very pricey and according to users, did not work as well as they looked. Plus they supposedly had some cracking problems because of CNC machined in stress risers (too many sharp corners?).
I'd consider them as more of "boutique" type of components, more at home on show bikes than in the peleton or on a serious continental touring rig....
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Old 11-04-19, 05:36 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by unworthy1 View Post
I don't THINK so: the chainring that's marked "made in USA" certainly but never heard of Mavic setting up shop in USA to make those cranks (or anything else in alloy)
Never heard of Mavic contracting with a US maker too......
But they did do it with Modolo/Italy and supposedly some Japanese component makers too, for brakesets (Dia Compe), pedals (Look), Shifters (Simplex) and maybe cranksets (SR?).
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Old 11-04-19, 06:02 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
There are or were a few cantilever brakes but some, like Pauls, were real spendy. I think Pauls was the only rear derailleur made in the US but I think it still needed shipmano shifters.
Let us not forget the White Industries LMDS!!

Photo credit to DisraeliGears.
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Old 11-04-19, 06:10 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by scarlson View Post
Let us not forget the White Industries LMDS!!

Photo credit to DisraeliGears.
heh. the write up on DisraeliGears for that is pretty funny as well. Sounds fiddly and maybe at home on a road bike more than a MTB... someone (else) should try it.
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Old 11-06-19, 07:59 PM
  #45  
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Can't quite be sure I've scanned every post, looks like no one has mentioned American Classic. The hubs and seatpost were extremely popular in the 80s. Good quality, good price, fast return on order of any oddball drilling or sizing. Plenty of Paramounts would have had them. Al Kingsbury.

Grip Shift made shifters right here in Chicago. They'd make anything. You want indexing with an ultra seven and 1020/a, sure, we can do that. While still locally made at least some triathletes bought them so it was a product, not just a prototype. The makers tried and tried and tried to get any of the local racers to use them. So far as I know they never got a bite. Then MTB came along and those guys with the strange orphan product were suddenly SRAM.
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Old 11-06-19, 11:24 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by 63rickert View Post
Can't quite be sure I've scanned every post, looks like no one has mentioned American Classic. The hubs and seatpost were extremely popular in the 80s. Good quality, good price, fast return on order of any oddball drilling or sizing. Plenty of Paramounts would have had them. Al Kingsbury.
I just bought one! Possibly the lightest 25.0 post you can get. Apparently the bolts used to break if they were silver-colored. Mine has black bolts, so I should be good...



Grip Shift made shifters right here in Chicago. They'd make anything. You want indexing with an ultra seven and 1020/a, sure, we can do that. While still locally made at least some triathletes bought them so it was a product, not just a prototype. The makers tried and tried and tried to get any of the local racers to use them. So far as I know they never got a bite. Then MTB came along and those guys with the strange orphan product were suddenly SRAM.
Did Grip Shift stuff from back when it was U.S.-made work any better than the stuff I find on all the midrange '90s and '00s MTBs? I feel like I'm always replacing these on friends' rigs because some piddly plastic tab has broken off or a tiny spring has bitten the dust.
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Old 11-07-19, 01:08 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by scarlson View Post
I just bought one! Possibly the lightest 25.0 post you can get. Apparently the bolts used to break if they were silver-colored. Mine has black bolts, so I should be good...




Did Grip Shift stuff from back when it was U.S.-made work any better than the stuff I find on all the midrange '90s and '00s MTBs? I feel like I'm always replacing these on friends' rigs because some piddly plastic tab has broken off or a tiny spring has bitten the dust.
They were better made because they were purely hand-machined, one at a time. They were used on some triathlete bikes and you'd have to ask a tri-guy if they were durable. Big clunky pieces, should have lasted.

I'd guess there were not more than a couple hundred made. Then MTB, could have been some handmade for that market but very quickly they had big OEM sales and you know the rest. If you look at the history page at the SRAM site the 'original' shifter pictured is the last handmade model. Originals were bigger, clunkier.

For road use I knew two guys who finally gave in to the sales pitch and the free. Rudy installed his, brought them out one morning, turned around early to go home and take them off. Mike was having some racing success and there were big promises if he could be photoed winning with Grip Shift. He rode them maybe twice, maybe three times. Training, not racing. There was just no way. They shifted the gears well enough, just too darn big and pointless. A solution in search of a problem.
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Old 11-07-19, 01:15 PM
  #48  
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@JohnDThompson, I remember Jobst Brandt saying Avocet tires were made by IRC in Japan. Of course, my memory could be wrong.
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Old 11-07-19, 07:33 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
@JohnDThompson, I remember Jobst Brandt saying Avocet tires were made by IRC in Japan. Of course, my memory could be wrong.
Not sure, but IIRC, the early Specialized Turbo folding tires were also made in Japan.
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Old 11-07-19, 08:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post
Not sure, but IIRC, the early Specialized Turbo folding tires were also made in Japan.
Yes. Those tires were made by Mitsuboshi in Japan.
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