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New Chain Skips On Freewheel

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New Chain Skips On Freewheel

Old 11-23-23, 11:18 AM
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Yes, thanks to you and the others, this bike has been repaired, test ridden and is ready to ride.

Yesterday, I installed a new chain and an almost new, 5 speed Dura Ace freewheel (14-16-18-20-22T).

It didn't take long to do. I spent more time disassembling the freewheel and marvelling over the broken cog than the repair.

As P!N20 said, "Too much power".

Last edited by Bad Lag; 11-23-23 at 11:37 AM.
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Old 11-24-23, 06:50 AM
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Originally Posted by noglider
@Bad LagYou often have to change the chain and freewheel together. < > The wear may not be visible, but it's there.
Exactly the takeaway. Wear of components, sufficient to cause issues with their performance or longevity, isn't something readily visible even with the use of tools.

I guess I was lucky this year changing stuff on my MB. Did the FW first but nothing else, got away with it OK only to learn I needed to go further with changing stuff to gain the gearing advantage I was seeking.

Ended up swapping crankset (eBay / needed smaller inside ring), chain rings (ended up with three), BB (VeloOrange cassette vs. cup & balls), rear derailer too (donor bike / longer cage), plus a new chain.

Chain was the least $$ bit. (I don't get paid for my time invested in the work either, save for the benefit of the experience and performance once it's all done.)

Never looked back once I tried it all, it simply works!
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Old 11-24-23, 07:13 AM
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I'd guess that most of us who spent years working in shops as bike mechanics read the opening post and knew that (a) the problem was, as usual, new chain/old freewheel and (b) the OP and many subsequent posters would come up a dozen alternative theories (some more plausible than others, to put it delicately). This thread ran a bit longer than most "but the freewheel looks fine" threads, though, so it was pretty entertaining.
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Old 11-24-23, 07:38 AM
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I should add that it is sometimes possible to change the chain alone. I change mine frequently to avoid wearing out my cogs. By "wasting" chains (replacing them before they're fully worn), I can go through approximately three chains before I have to change my cassette.

I'm glad to hear the bike works well and that we've been able to help.
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Old 11-24-23, 07:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Bad Lag
It's time to buy some replacement cogs or even a whole new freewheel. I have a lot of freewheels in my kit but this one was my favorite and most used - 14-16-18-21-24. It is a Suntour Pro Comp.
^key phrase
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Old 11-24-23, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by noglider
I should add that it is sometimes possible to change the chain alone.
That had already been made abundantly clear in this thread.
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Old 11-24-23, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by noglider
I should add that it is sometimes possible to change the chain alone. I change mine frequently to avoid wearing out my cogs. By "wasting" chains (replacing them before they're fully worn), I can go through approximately three chains before I have to change my cassette.
I've noticed the 3 (chains) to 1 (cassette) ratio in my bikes too.

In fact, on the bikes that get the bulk of my miles, I will actually rotate between three chains so they wear at the same rate as the cassette. This might be a bit too attention to a small detail, but it seems like a better idea than throwing a new chain onto a cassette with 1/3 of its life remaining. It does require actually keeping track of the chains so they stay in the rotation sequence, though.
I pull my chains off for cleaning and lube every 500 miles, which is when I swap to the next chain in the sequence.

Drive train wear is one of those things that is slow and progressive, and it's easy to ignore until it's no longer possible. All of us eventually learn the subtle details of what wears first and what the symptoms are.

Steve in Peoria
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Old 11-24-23, 01:36 PM
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@steelbikeguy, yes, that's too complicated BUT I did accidentally buy two chains so maybe I'll do that. I generally avoid cleaning chains, as I find it to be unrewarding, but maybe I'll take this one off, clean it, store it, and install the other one. Keeping track of the miles or months is another complication. Thanks for the idea.
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Old 11-24-23, 06:09 PM
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I've spent the last month focused on the drive train while riding. It was either the broken crank, the replacement crank, the noises, the grinding, the freewheel or the chain. .

The recent rides are nice and quiet now - no grinding; no slippage; super-fast, unambiguous shifting. I can get back to enjoying the scenery.

I may buy another one of these IZUMI chains just to have it on hand. I also need to get some spare freewheel cogs and set those aside, too.
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Old 11-25-23, 07:59 AM
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The purists here won't like reading this, but I've converted all of my derailleur bikes to cassette hubs. They are better in many ways. Axles don't break, and it's easier to get cassettes than cogs for freewheels.
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Old 11-27-23, 07:45 PM
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The wheels I am riding are almost 40 years old - MAVIC MA2 rims on Performance Bike sealed bearing hubs. They remain rock solid but it is just a matter of time.

I have some VO rims in the rafters, waiting. I have sets of Record and 1st Gen Dura-Ace hubs, waiting.

This bike is and will remain 120 mm spacing with a 5 speed freewheel.

As heavy as I am, I have never broken an axle. (knocks on wood).


P.S. - I am really liking the all-new drive train and am quickly regaining my confidence in it. It is smooth-shifting and runs quietly.
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Old 11-28-23, 05:50 AM
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Much the Same Here

Originally Posted by Bad Lag
The wheels I am riding are almost 40 years old...
51+ on my MAVIC rims -


Wired to Campy Record wide-flange 36h hubs front & back, ball & cap still (but with new bearings this last spring). Have a pair of eBay'd Ukai 19mm clincher rims sitting idle, waiting to be wired to an identical pair of Campy hubs (eBay'd again) so I can try riding on clinchers next season. Don't ride that Kona I bought last April much, the MB GR is vastly more fun & 12 pounds lighter.

Originally Posted by Bad Lag
I have some VO rims in the rafters, waiting. I have sets of Record and 1st Gen Dura-Ace hubs, waiting.

This bike is and will remain 120 mm spacing with a 5 speed freewheel.
Same here though I futzed with the gearing front & back this year. Stock 2x5 (din't work where I ride now, once I got back on the saddle after over ten+ years lapse) changed to 3x5 with a VO BB cassette & Stronglite 93 crankset.[/QUOTE]

Originally Posted by Bad Lag
As heavy as I am, I have never broken an axle. (knocks on wood).
Seems from your OP there's other bits in your drivetrain that may be less up to the challenge?

My personal gremlins are lack of habituation (to getting out and riding), shortish riding season (it's 10F outside as I key this in) and a bit of Arthur Itis showing his face the last few months.

Originally Posted by Bad Lag
P.S. - I am really liking the all-new drive train and am quickly regaining my confidence in it. It is smooth-shifting and runs quietly.
Same here. Season slammed shut too soon for me to get many miles done but what few I managed proved the worth of the various upgrades. Looking forward to warmer weather's returning in a few months.
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Old 11-28-23, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by spclark
Seems from your OP there's other bits in your drivetrain that may be less up to the challenge?
Indeed!, so you'll understand that I may be a little concerned about wear, fatigue and corrosion. My crank snapped, chainrings wore out, freewheel wore out, chain wore out, dust caps snapped, rim eyelets show some corrosion,...

The good news is, my tires and brakes are wearing out. <-- That's my attempt at a humor, a way of saying I am riding a lot. It is 70 degrees and sunny here, today, with a beautiful on-shore breeze.
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Old 12-13-23, 12:16 PM
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I've been riding with the new chain and freewheel for a month now.

The new IZUMI chain has been great! This chain is so quiet, I'm not sure I've ever had one so quiet before.

It is so quiet, it is almost a problem because you cannot even hear it shift (but I'm not complaining). There's no "snick" or "chunk".

I'm wondering what the lube is. It seems very viscous, almost like 90W gear oil. It certainly smelled like a petroleum product.

That $25 was well spent. I also ordered a spare, as this one will eventually wear out.

Thanks for all the help and guidance, especially to Fried Chicken for the suggestion of an IZUMI chain. It has worked out well.

I'm heading out for a ride soon.

Last edited by Bad Lag; 12-13-23 at 11:18 PM.
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Old 12-13-23, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Bad Lag
I'm wondering what the lube is. It seems very viscous, almost like 90W gear oil. It certainly smelled like a petroleum product.
Could very well be 90W if it smells like petroleum. Let us know if you find that, over time, it collects grit like something sticky ought to.

I've been taking advantage of some occupational therapy for arthritis in my left thumb. Tech suggested a hot wax 'bath' (paraffin @ 125F) which I found really messy but helpful in relieving the pain after a day at work.

Messy though, so I may save the thing I bought off Amazon for $45 for waxing chains instead. Hot water bath (for my hand, in a 2 qt measuring cup) works just as well, isn't nearly as messy. Save the wax for bike chains next year.
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Old 12-13-23, 06:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Bad Lag
I've been riding with the new chain and freewheel for a month now. The new IZUMI ES410 chain has been great!
Interesting. The Izumi 410 series site says it's only available in 1/8".
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Old 12-13-23, 07:00 PM
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Originally Posted by SurferRosa
Interesting. The Izumi 410 series site says it's only available in 1/8".
... and single speed only? Yikes!
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Old 12-13-23, 07:17 PM
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Their naming conventions are confusing. Here it says the ES410C is for 5-6 speed clusters:

https://medium.com/@IZUMICHAIN_1916/...n-77507c8e0c67

It's a bushing chain that weighs about 80 grams more than a KMC X8.
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Old 12-13-23, 09:24 PM
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Originally Posted by SurferRosa
Interesting. The Izumi 410 series site says it's only available in 1/8".

ES410 vs numeric only?
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Old 12-13-23, 11:26 PM
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Link to Izumi Chain

410C

from $20.99

All the style and durability of the 410 in a chain made for 5-6 speed bicycles. Pick the striking Jet Black/Silver finish for style, or the Silver 410CNP for exceptional rust resistance even when used in the nastiest urban riding conditions.

Available in 1/2x3/32 width only

362g (116 links)

Select the chain that is right for you from the 410C series
410C - The Original
410C_JB-S - Jet Black/Silver
410CNP - Silver, Exceptional Rust Resistance

The package is correctly labeled as 1/2" X 3/32" but the 410C code does not appear. Also, the ES410C I was originally given appears to be incorrect, so I edited my post, above.


Last edited by Bad Lag; 12-14-23 at 12:58 PM.
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