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1970's peugeot brake levers

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1970's peugeot brake levers

Old 12-26-13, 06:33 PM
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1970's peugeot brake levers

is it easy to remove the extra arm coming off the brake lever ( not sure what its called) it run along the handle bars, useful occasionally, but butt ugly...
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Old 12-26-13, 06:39 PM
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Safety levers, turkey levers.... lots of names and many ways to detach them but might not be good for the brakes. Quite a few will leave a screw attachment sticking out the side. What make of levers are these ? Pics will be a plus !
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Old 12-26-13, 07:18 PM
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That would be Weiman
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Old 12-26-13, 07:58 PM
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Older Weinmann levers can be modified, but you have to be comfortable completely disassembling them.

There are two different pivot pins inside the lever, one is longer and internally threaded on one end for the safety lever.
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Old 12-26-13, 07:59 PM
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Check under those black plastic caps at the pivot, I think there could be a screw or bolt under it that you could remove to take off the levers..... IIRC, those caps just snap on and off so maybe you could use a butter knife to pop them off.....
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Old 12-26-13, 08:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Pistard
is it easy to remove the extra arm coming off the brake lever ( not sure what its called) it run along the handle bars, useful occasionally, but butt ugly...
Yes indeed, more about that here: https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...suicide-levers
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Old 12-26-13, 10:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Pistard
is it easy to remove the extra arm coming off the brake lever ( not sure what its called) it run along the handle bars, useful occasionally, but butt ugly...
Originally Posted by Metacortex
What Metacortex points out in the referenced thread is the way to go. Just a hacksaw will make quick work of it, and there is generally a step on the pivot which serves as your guide to flush them out with the brake lever body. This enables you to slip on some hoods w/o any unsightly bulge.

I've performed this Turkey-wing-ectomy on scores of bikes. I generally did it to all my flips, and I've even had to do it on some higher-end bikes. - Not sure if they came stock or if the original owner had them installed, but IMO it's best to dispense with them because their flex greatly compromises stopping distance.

Some people argue that beginning riders (who often abjure the drops) are better off with the turkey wings than without (asserting that "some brakes are better than none") - but I think their presence just creates a very bad habit.
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Old 12-27-13, 08:25 AM
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I learned a new word from that post.
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Old 12-27-13, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by auchencrow
What Metacortex points out in the referenced thread is the way to go. Just a hacksaw will make quick work of it, and there is generally a step on the pivot which serves as your guide to flush them out with the brake lever body. This enables you to slip on some hoods w/o any unsightly bulge.
Been there ... done that. In the good ol' days it was pretty easy to find replacement pivots, for a finished look sans hoods. Fortunately, aftermarket hoods for Weinmann are pretty widely available.

Originally Posted by auchencrow
I've performed this Turkey-wing-ectomy on scores of bikes. I generally did it to all my flips, and I've even had to do it on some higher-end bikes. - Not sure if they came stock or if the original owner had them installed, but IMO it's best to dispense with them because their flex greatly compromises stopping distance.

Some people argue that beginning riders (who often abjure the drops) are better off with the turkey wings than without (asserting that "some brakes are better than none") - but I think their presence just creates a very bad habit.
If you ever feel the need for turkey wings, get aero handles and cable housing interrupters, which are what suicide levers should have been, but weren't.
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Old 12-27-13, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by John E
If you ever feel the need for turkey wings, get aero handles and cable housing interrupters, which are what suicide levers should have been, but weren't.
Or use guidonnet levers:

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Old 12-27-13, 06:03 PM
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When Peugeots came with Mafac brakes as standard, they came without "comfort" levers. A local machine shop made a pivot kit that secured with a C clip. Easy to add them for a customer, knock out the press fit pivot pin, insert the aftermarket pin with the Dia-Compe extension lever kit, install the clip and done. A nice $15-18 dollar time of sale upgrade. Adding extension levers to plain Weinmann brakes required taking apart the lever- much more shop time.

Add a kickstand and a ******** Rack and there is where a shop back then made money. Not much on the bike as a "free service" came with it to take in stretched cable slack and note of the client could remember how you taught them to use a quick release skewer.
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