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Will it hold up?

Old 06-24-19, 07:33 PM
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Halfpoundbobby
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Will it hold up?

OK. So I just picked up an absolutely gorgeous old Raleigh from LetGo for a steal. I intended on stripping it down to the frame and building it back up with more modern components from my parts hoard and donor bike harem.

But... this thing is too nice to turn into a Frankenstein. The previous owner (1 owner!) really kept it up. Everything is smooth as buttet. All the bike really needs is new bar tape... and a thread bushing on one of the cranks, which is stripped and devoid of a pedal.

I'm totally comfortable doing the repair, but I'm not convinced it will stand up to my heft, especially with me standing up and going over bumps. Every time I've done this repair, it's been for a child's bike. And I am the size and weight of many children.

It's an old-school cottered crank and I am 6'5" and 330-ish pounds. Should I do the thread bushing or just get new cottered cranks?

If this belongs in a repair sub-forum instead, I apologize.
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Old 06-24-19, 09:25 PM
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From what I’m reading, it sounds to me like you might have the skills to make it right and keep it right, so why not? Without seeing the situation with my own eyes, I’d be inclined to go with a new crankset but if you can realistically save what you got, give it a go. True up the wheels, dial in the brakes and ride it.

Every once in a while I’ll stumble onto a “Garage Queen” and it’s kinda fun to just strip it down, clean it up, and ride a piece of history.


-Kedosto
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Old 06-24-19, 10:37 PM
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Halfpoundbobby
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Cheers to that.

I'm going to go for it. Worst case scenario, I take a little tumble and replace the crank anyway. Some of those crazy downhill guys have surviving cranks with repair bushings, so my flat pavement riding should hopefully work out.
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Old 06-24-19, 11:45 PM
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Cotter crank, or Cotterless Crank?

If the crankset has cotters, then it should be steel. It will be hard to break that, although perhaps you'll be able to successfully bend it.

Upload some photos and close-ups to your Album/Gallery page:
https://www.bikeforums.net/g/user/500264

It is quite possible that even if it is in pristine condition, it is not an extremely valuable bike. And, in that case, have at it to make it into your dream bike.

Wheels are likely to take more of a beating than the crankset, but you've likely got 36 spoke wheels which should be reasonably good. Steel rims?
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Old 06-25-19, 03:45 AM
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Yeah, steel cottered cranks. I just cut another little jig for beating those little suckers out so I don't destroy the bb. Hopefully I can get to it tomorrow. It's the softer brass of the bushing that gives me a little bit of paranoia when I think about putting all my weight on it.

The bike is a 1980 or 81 Rapide Mixte, so it was definitely not anything special back in the day (lowest on the totem pole), but I haven't found a speck of rust anywhere, and everything spins and shifts smoother than my newest bikes.

Wheels and steel rims are totally true, which was a pleasant surprise. I don't know if they're original or not. The front has a QR, so maybe not.

I can't think of another $25 I've been more satisfied with in recent memory.
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Old 06-25-19, 03:55 PM
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What is the cost of rethreading the existing crank for a pedal, vs buying a replacement crankset? Since you're doing the work, I assume the cost of the repair is essentially zero. I'd go ahead and attempt the repair, and if it works, great, you've avoided the cost of a crankset. If it fails, not much lost.

I don't think the failure mode would be catastrophic, surely the pedal would bend noticeably before flying out completely.

I had to have a stripped alu crank repaired by a shop once, they used helicoil. It cost me I think $40. I have had no issues with it since (thousands of miles of riding). I'm 230ish, but I also always use 20mm pedal extenders, which significantly increase the leverage on the pedal eye.
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