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You know you're a Clydesdale when your fork and headset break after a race

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You know you're a Clydesdale when your fork and headset break after a race

Old 05-16-23, 05:44 PM
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You know you're a Clydesdale when your fork and headset break after a race

I made a goal to ride the Paris to Ancaster gravel race this spring, the 70km classic. It was awesome, soaking wet, and full of mud!

I started cleaning my bike afterward and realized every thing that spins on my bike either didn't or sounded like it was grinding sand.





Around 60km in my steering was erratic and stem was loose. I think I found out why! Anyway, a new rebuild is underway and Im hoping to contribute some more this summer as I get some miles under my belt.
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Old 05-17-23, 06:23 AM
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I'm thinking heavy and strong riders need a new complete bicycle on a regular basis. My riding buddy is 215 lbs and I'm amazed how fast he burns up rims, spokes, chains, etc. The shifters and derailleurs are keepers, but he uses up most of the machine in 5000ish miles.
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Old 05-17-23, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by BTinNYC
I'm thinking heavy and strong riders need a new complete bicycle on a regular basis. My riding buddy is 215 lbs and I'm amazed how fast he burns up rims, spokes, chains, etc. The shifters and derailleurs are keepers, but he uses up most of the machine in 5000ish miles.
hopefully not a regular thing for me lol! That said Iíve broken three spokes this year, broken the fork and headset, replaced the bottom bracket. Iím also upgrading the brakes and cables/housing to help make everything easier.
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Old 05-17-23, 03:36 PM
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Originally Posted by BTinNYC
I'm thinking heavy and strong riders need a new complete bicycle on a regular basis. My riding buddy is 215 lbs and I'm amazed how fast he burns up rims, spokes, chains, etc. The shifters and derailleurs are keepers, but he uses up most of the machine in 5000ish miles.
Depends on what youíre riding. I easily put at least 1,500 miles of loaded touring miles on my LHT every year, plus commuting and general transportation miles. The rims lasted 7 years without one broken spoke. New chain and cassette maybe every three years, but thatís primarily due to how the bike is used, not my 220 lbs. Iíve replaced other parts, but again, it has been primarily due to riding conditions. For example, a headset doesnít last as long when your bike sits out all night in rain with only a pine tree for cover. Then there are the hilly/ mountainous, unpaved miles under load.
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Old 05-17-23, 03:45 PM
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I am surprised they're still slotting the steer tubes. That weakness has been known for several decades.

Did your bike have cantis or V-brakes?

It looks like some more modern high quality components would fare better, although steel should be good.

Don't over-tighten the stem.
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Old 05-17-23, 04:41 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK
I am surprised they're still slotting the steer tubes. That weakness has been known for several decades.

Did your bike have cantis or V-brakes?

It looks like some more modern high quality components would fare better, although steel should be good.

Don't over-tighten the stem.
Iím building it back up with quality components. Iím installing an Ultegra bottom bracket, Tektro CR720 cantis to replace the vintage Diacompe 980s, FSA Duron 1Ē headset, and narrower bars too. The 46cm cowchippers were too wide and Iím not sold on the flared drops.
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Old 05-21-23, 11:41 PM
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I weigh in at 265lbs and ride in mud and rain a bit every winter. I haven't had any problems because I don't beat my bike and I always clean it after uses looking for problems. Usually headsets and bottom brackets of any quality can keep out mud. I did break a rear drive side spoke last year. None this year so far. Regular checks on spoke tension is a given at my weight. Rain might get in but again better headsets and bottom brackets have pretty good seals to stop that. Lower quality headsets and bottom brackets will allow in dirt and water and have to be rebuilt/replaced fairly regularly if you are in bad conditions. Looks like you are on the right track with the purchase of better quality replacement parts. The brake upgrade for this type of braking system is V-brakes. This would also mean you would have to buy long travel handlebar levers and a pair of brake wire noodles along with the V-brake arms. V-brakes are definitely more powerful than cantilever but both are more than adequate brakes for everything up to and including MTB riding in the mountains.
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