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Shimano RS20 wheelset

Old 03-31-09, 10:19 PM
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Shimano RS20 wheelset

Okay, I'm a big guy @6'1" & 245lbs. I'm looking at a new bike that comes with a Shimano RS20 wheelset. The rear wheel is just 20 spokes. I've talked to a couple bike shops and they say no problem, but in my mind any number less than 32 just ain't gonna hold up this old bag of bones. Any one have any experience with these wheels? Am I too paranoid? Will Buffalo go to the superbowl? Will Jack save the Country one more season???
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Old 03-31-09, 10:49 PM
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there are some of us in your class (6'1" 245lbs) that ride the new style wheels. i use mavic ksyrium elites and bontragers, puck uses gossamer wisps.

id actually like to get a spreadsheet going where we plot the clydes on spiderweb wheels, where they ride, how far they ride and the particular riders height and weight, to actually see if technology has caught up with our weight.

a wheel builder buddy of mine, whos has ben paid to built more wheels than everone on bf combined, x2, oked the new style and i trust him. so have some of the other good local wheelbuilders. ok, to be honest, they oked mavic and hed, i dont know about the other brands.

Last edited by grimace308; 04-01-09 at 02:46 PM.
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Old 03-31-09, 11:18 PM
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Originally Posted by DennyV
Okay, I'm a big guy @6'1" & 245lbs. I'm looking at a new bike that comes with a Shimano RS20 wheelset. The rear wheel is just 20 spokes. I've talked to a couple bike shops and they say no problem, but in my mind any number less than 32 just ain't gonna hold up this old bag of bones. Any one have any experience with these wheels? Am I too paranoid?
I don't have personal experience with those wheels. Are they actually RS20 (I've never heard of that model), or are they R520? I know a lot of people have had rather poor experience with the R500, another shimano wheelset. I don't know if R520 is any better, but I wouldn't put my money on it.

Spoke count isn't the only determining factor in quality of the wheels, but the quality of the rim, spokes, and hubs all in combination is what matters. My main road bike has mavic aksiums, a 20-spoke wheelset. My other bike has bontrager race select, also a 20 spoke wheelset. Both have been holding up fine under my pounding, 6'0 @ 260 lbs, 300lbs when I started.

Here are some wheelsets commonly recommended here in C&A:
- Mavic Open Pro rims with Ultegra Hubs (32 spoke)
- Mavic CXP33 rims with Ultegra hubs (32 spoke)
- Velocity Deep V's with ultegra hubs (32 spoke)
- Mavic Aksium (20 spoke)

All of these should cost you around $250ish or less for the pair. Mavic Ksyriums are also pretty highly recommended, but will cost substantially more.

Buy what makes you comfortable; if that's 32-spoke wheels, it's fine. But not all 32 spoke wheels are made alike, and there are many bad 32-spoke wheels out there too (mostly rims are the issue.) But there are a few 20 spoke wheelsets like the aksiums which will fly straight and true for many thousands of miles.

32-spoke wheels do have some advantages, namely if you do break a spoke, your rim won't likely be as far out of true as on a 20-spoke wheel. Even on 19 spokes on a solid wheel like the aksium, you can ride home no worries though. 20 spoked wheels are a bit lighter and zippier and blingier, 32 spoked wheels get the advantage that even out in the middle of nowhere you can probably find spokes at a bike shop, while it's less likely for someone to have a replacement mavic bladed spoke on hand.

Will Buffalo go to the superbowl?
We'll see in January.

Will Jack save the Country one more season???
Denny
I don't see why not; as long as contracts are renewed.
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Old 03-31-09, 11:24 PM
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Originally Posted by grimace308
id actually like to get a spreadsheet going where we plot the clydes on spiderweb wheels, where they ride, how far they ride and the particular riders height and weight, to actually see if technology has caught up with our weight.
I'd like to say yes the tech has caught up, at least for the mavic wheels, hed, some bontrager, maybe some alex rims. I ride with panniers in addition to my weight on my commuter bike on 20 spokes, and it's not really been an issue I have given a second thought. My LBS okayed the combo too. I'd ride a 32 spoked wheel if I had one, but I don't and won't get one until these break, which they don't seem to be

I'd be interested in seeing/participating in this spreadsheet.
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Old 03-31-09, 11:56 PM
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Thanks for the thoughts and replys From the Shimano Website:
https://bike.shimano.com/publish/cont...-S.-type-.html
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Old 04-01-09, 06:22 AM
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FWIW: I'm 240-250 ish and ride Xero 20/24 spoke wheels with no issues. I recommend getting the wheels trued / spokes retensioned after the first few hundred miles.

Hmmm......Just a thought -- more spokes = more holes in the rim = a weaker rim??

Most importantly, enjoy your new bike !!

Last edited by Bone Head; 04-01-09 at 06:29 AM.
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Old 04-01-09, 08:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Bone Head
Hmmm......Just a thought -- more spokes = more holes in the rim = a weaker rim??
Only if you have SO many holes that you've placed them close enough together such that the remaining bits of metal aren't strong enough to hold the spokes any longer when under tension.

More spokes will distribute the force of impact (potholes, etc.) over a greater area, so no one spoke is taking the full brunt of the shock. It's a stronger wheel in terms of being able to endure a heavier load over a longer period of time (if all aspects of the wheel builds being equal, except spoke count.)

It's why you see 40 and 48 spoke wheels on touring tandems, and 36 spoke wheels on many brevet bikes (even when the rider is well under 200 pounds.)
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Old 04-01-09, 08:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Bone Head
Hmmm......Just a thought -- more spokes = more holes in the rim = a weaker rim??

Most importantly, enjoy your new bike !!
With all the mention of low spoke count wheels I just through I'd mention I personally would avoid mavic crossrides. I blew the rear wheel quickly when the spokes nipples started tearing the rim apart. Not sure on the 700 size equivilent hopefully it is better although you'd expect the offroad version to be tougher?

As far as more spokes.. I would have these on my bike even just for weekend social rides if they had ones with a freewheel
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Old 04-01-09, 09:28 AM
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Originally Posted by DennyV
I've talked to a couple bike shops and they say no problem, but in my mind any number less than 32 just ain't gonna hold up this old bag of bones.
What concrete evidence do you have to support that idea? At 245, the RS20s should be fine for you assuming the spokes are properly tensioned. Buy the bike, ride it. Upgrade if you run into problems with the wheels. No reason to spend money fixing problems you're not having yet...
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Old 04-01-09, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Bone Head

Hmmm......Just a thought -- more spokes = more holes in the rim = a weaker rim??
My feable attempt at humor was obviously wasted.
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Old 04-01-09, 01:37 PM
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I am 6' 2.5" and weight about 215lbs, but always carry some handlebar bag w/ tools, etc with my so that adds an other 5 Lbs. So around 220 lbs I'm only a little lighter. My LeMond came with low spoke count Bontrager wheels. Suprisingly these wheels still are in good shape after about 1100 miles. My 32 spoke Bontrager wheels on my Gary Fisher hybrid was blowing the rear spokes starting around 700 miles and around 900 miles was replaced under warrentee. A well made low spoke wheel therefore is better than a marginal quality. If I were to buy a replacement wheel, I'd go with deep V and a few more spokes. I think my LeMond has 20 F 24 R, but I don't have the bike in front of me to confirm.

Happy riding,
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Old 04-01-09, 03:23 PM
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I understand the technology caught up statement but I'm at 210 lbs and have destroyed many rear wheels climbing hills. I've gone through three Mavic Ksyrium Elites and two Ksyrium SLs because wheelbuilders have told me that these wheels have a maximum of 250 lbs. I also went through the problem with Neuvation M28 Aero and aero 2 wheels. I now have a Neuvation M28 Aero3 rear wheel with Neuvations redesigned hub and haven't had anyproblems in the 14 months I've owned it. Those are 16 front 20 rear set up. However, I don't ride on those wheels regularly. My main wheelset are a pair of Velocity Deep Vs. These things are like practically indestructable. A 32 or 36 spoke set up is your best bet. One of my riding buddies is 6'4" 250 lbs and he rides on a pair of Mavic Open Pros. This guy climbs like he's 100 lbs less and his wheels seem to do a fine job handling his weight and torque. I'm confident that my Deep Vs would be able to handle his weight and then some on any given day too. High tensioned, low spoke count wheels are fun to ride on. My Neuvations spin up fast and spin forever, but a Clydesdale and a pair of low spoke count wheels= A recipe for disaster. I've seen more than enough Trek's and Specialized with higher spoke count rear wheels because of this. To you Clydes riding low spoke wheels, if it hasn't happened yet, it will.
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Old 04-01-09, 03:31 PM
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What's considered low spoke count I have 24 on th eback of a set of Shimano R500 with over 10000k on them and have broke 5 spokes. None after the wheel was totally rebuilt.
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Old 04-16-09, 09:55 PM
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I am a large clyde and I took the advice of the other Aces here and bought the Deep V 36 spoke with Ultegra hubs before the bike was ordered. I have never had a problem with them, and I ride some very rough roads. Sure you can use a stock rim for awhile, but why bother with something that could cause you trouble at a less than desirable time.
Good Luck,
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Old 09-04-11, 10:38 PM
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I'm 6-3/240 and I pulled three spokes out of the rim on my Shimano RS20. If you generate a lot of power I would not recommend these. That said I did log about 2000 miles on them before destroying the rear wheel. I had to scratch a couple rides after breaking spokes on these rims as well. Once at the top of a 2500ft climb and once on some rollers. They are very responsive and I felt good riding on them. I really liked them on descents. Just not durable enough for me. Rolling on a Mavic Kysium Race since then. It's been rugged, but feels slower than the RS20.
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Old 09-04-11, 11:05 PM
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If the RS20s are as good as my RS10s ask the LBS to keep the wheels and buy something better.

I broke a spoke on my second ride on RS10....bought some higher spoke wheels that day and ride the on commutes night rides etc.... as for the RS10s I baby them and they've still have been to the bike shop 4 more times after the initial broken spoke (total 3 broken spokes and 2 pulled nipples).

Mike
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