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Philly-Area Folks: No Sleep 'til Brooklyn!

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Philly-Area Folks: No Sleep 'til Brooklyn!

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Old 08-08-12, 08:04 AM
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indyfabz
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Philly-Area Folks: No Sleep 'til Brooklyn!

That day of the year is quickly approaching:

http://phillybikeclub.org/newbcp/eve...cridemain.html

I am looking forward to another great edition. It's not for everyone. You need to be more self-reliant than you do on many other event rides. The roads are not marked, and SAG support is limited. But how often do you get ride to the coolest city in world?
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Old 08-08-12, 11:03 AM
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chefisaac
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Can you tell us more about the ride? I was thinking of doing it this year.
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Old 08-09-12, 07:20 AM
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indyfabz
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What do you want to know? The terrain is not overly difficult but can sneak up on you because of the total mileage. Mostly rolling with some moderately to fairly challenging hills thrown in until about mile 68. After that, it's mostly flat except for a short hill in Jersey City and a couple of bridges.

Believe it or not, the route is not primarily "urban combat" riding. Except for the area around Somerville, NJ, traffic ranges from none to light until the ice cream store stop in Kenilworth, NJ around mile 68. From there, you have some traffic to deal with, but there is a stretch of 7 miles through the Port of Elizabeth & Newark that has almost no traffic. Traffic picks up again as you enter Jersey City but then we take mostly quiet residential streets north to Hoboken, Once you cross the Hudson from Hoboken, NJ to Midtown via a scenic ferry ride, you ride south on the bike path paralleling the river. Then your ride about 5 bolocks through Manhattan to the bike/ped path on the Brooklyn Bridge. The path is in the center of the bridge above the car deck so you get a great view of the bridge architecture, the East River and the Manhattan skyline.





From the Brooklyn side of the bridge it's about a half mile to the finsish at the hip Nu Hotel, where there will be free beer and a shower waiting for you. Bikles are put on a truck driven my Mombo Movers. Dinner is on your own. Cobble Hill, Brooklyn Heights and environs have an endless variety of places to eat that range from cheap to expensive. The night view of the East River, lower Manhattan and the Statue of Libery from the promendade in B' Heights is one of the coolest urban views in the world. Busses leave at 9 pm. sharp. The busses and bike truck stop first at New Hope and then proceed to Philly. Unless you don't have transportation, I recommend driving yourself to New Hope in the morning so you can drive yourself home at night.

Food and water is available at well enough spaced intervals, but you need to be prepared to do at least the first 22 miles (measured from New Hope) without any services. There is also a stretch between the "lunch" stop at mile 45 and mile 68 where you won't find much.

I serve as an informal ride leader. If I leave New Hope by 7:30 a.m. I can usually finish between 4:00 and 4:30 asuming to flats or things like that. Part of it depends on the ferry. If you just miss one, you have to wait 20 min. for the next one. That can affect your time.

Everything except transportation, the free beer and the shower is pay as you go. In general, it's not the sort of ride for one who expects to be fed at a rest stop every 15 miles and driven the rest of the way simply because they are tired. It's also not really for anyone who wants to ride 20 miles and then rest for an hour. If you are having trouble finishing, you may be given public transit options (like NJT and PATH) to get you to the finish. You most definitely need to be able to follow a cue sheet and be able to realize when you have gone of course (if you do) and correct your mistake. With that said, every year slower riders easily complete the shorter distances.
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Old 08-09-12, 08:16 AM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
The night view of the East River, lower Manhattan and the Statue of Libery from the promendade in B' Heights is one of the coolest urban views in the world.
"But Patty's only seen the sights a girl can see from Brooklyn Heights..."
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Old 08-09-12, 01:59 PM
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chefisaac
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
What do you want to know? The terrain is not overly difficult but can sneak up on you because of the total mileage. Mostly rolling with some moderately to fairly challenging hills thrown in until about mile 68. After that, it's mostly flat except for a short hill in Jersey City and a couple of bridges.

Believe it or not, the route is not primarily "urban combat" riding. Except for the area around Somerville, NJ, traffic ranges from none to light until the ice cream store stop in Kenilworth, NJ around mile 68. From there, you have some traffic to deal with, but there is a stretch of 7 miles through the Port of Elizabeth & Newark that has almost no traffic. Traffic picks up again as you enter Jersey City but then we take mostly quiet residential streets north to Hoboken, Once you cross the Hudson from Hoboken, NJ to Midtown via a scenic ferry ride, you ride south on the bike path paralleling the river. Then your ride about 5 bolocks through Manhattan to the bike/ped path on the Brooklyn Bridge. The path is in the center of the bridge above the car deck so you get a great view of the bridge architecture, the East River and the Manhattan skyline.





From the Brooklyn side of the bridge it's about a half mile to the finsish at the hip Nu Hotel, where there will be free beer and a shower waiting for you. Bikles are put on a truck driven my Mombo Movers. Dinner is on your own. Cobble Hill, Brooklyn Heights and environs have an endless variety of places to eat that range from cheap to expensive. The night view of the East River, lower Manhattan and the Statue of Libery from the promendade in B' Heights is one of the coolest urban views in the world. Busses leave at 9 pm. sharp. The busses and bike truck stop first at New Hope and then proceed to Philly. Unless you don't have transportation, I recommend driving yourself to New Hope in the morning so you can drive yourself home at night.

Food and water is available at well enough spaced intervals, but you need to be prepared to do at least the first 22 miles (measured from New Hope) without any services. There is also a stretch between the "lunch" stop at mile 45 and mile 68 where you won't find much.

I serve as an informal ride leader. If I leave New Hope by 7:30 a.m. I can usually finish between 4:00 and 4:30 asuming to flats or things like that. Part of it depends on the ferry. If you just miss one, you have to wait 20 min. for the next one. That can affect your time.

Everything except transportation, the free beer and the shower is pay as you go. In general, it's not the sort of ride for one who expects to be fed at a rest stop every 15 miles and driven the rest of the way simply because they are tired. It's also not really for anyone who wants to ride 20 miles and then rest for an hour. If you are having trouble finishing, you may be given public transit options (like NJT and PATH) to get you to the finish. You most definitely need to be able to follow a cue sheet and be able to realize when you have gone of course (if you do) and correct your mistake. With that said, every year slower riders easily complete the shorter distances.
Thanks for the great info. When are cue sheets available? I would like enough time to map it out and load it to GPS.
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Old 08-10-12, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by chefisaac View Post
Thanks for the great info. When are cue sheets available? I would like enough time to map it out and load it to GPS.
Old versions are available at the BCP cue sheet library, which is accessible by all:

http://phillybikeclub.org/newbcp/rides/library

However, the 2011 versions that are in the library are for the "new" way between the ice cream store and the port. I follow the old way, which is much better. Nearly a mile shorter, fewer turns and no missing street signs. A few years ago I practically begged two people we caught up with at the ice cream store to wait and ride with my group rather than take the "new" way beause the route was much harder to follow. They were a smug pair and didn't want to wait for us. We ended up leaving about 10 min. after they did. As I thought they might, they got lost. I was showered, changed and working on my third beer by the time they finished some 90 min. after my group had. You can't save some people from themselves. The funny part was that one of them tried to play it off by poiting out that they got to spend more time on the road. Yeah. Lost in Linden, NJ is my idea of a great picnic.

There is a cue sheet for the 90 mile route labled "old." I would use that. The 70 mile starts at about mile 20.7 on the 90 mile "old" cue sheet. The 50 starts at the shopping center noted at mile 41.5.
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