Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Reccomend Wheels for commuting

Notices
Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Reccomend Wheels for commuting

Old 03-17-16, 01:03 PM
  #1  
ammarolli
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Reykjavík
Posts: 194

Bikes: Trek Crossrip 2 2017, Cube Cruve Pro 2015 and Berlín Dutch Bike 3 speed 2014

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Reccomend Wheels for commuting

I need a new wheels for my disc cube curve pro 28" as my rear hub is irreparable.
I commute every day in all kinds of weather in Iceland like snow, ice, salty and sandy roads.
I need strong wheels that I can run 9 speed cassette that has a sealed hub and at least 30 spokes as the roads are full of potholes.
The current wheels on the bike are 24mm 29" disc. The new wheels needs to be able to run 45mm tires as I want to be able to ride 42mm tires with fenders.
Any recommendation?
ammarolli is offline  
Old 03-17-16, 06:31 PM
  #2  
old's'cool
curmudgineer
 
old's'cool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Chicago SW burbs
Posts: 4,365

Bikes: 2 many 2 fit here

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 240 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 33 Posts
Well, if you're willing to build a custom wheel, I'd recommend the nearly indestructible Van Schotthorst Saphir stainless steel rim
old's'cool is offline  
Old 03-17-16, 07:35 PM
  #3  
kickstart
Senior Member
 
kickstart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Kent Wa.
Posts: 5,332

Bikes: 2005 Gazelle Golfo, 1935 Raleigh Sport, 1970 Robin Hood sport, 1974 Schwinn Continental, 1984 Ross MTB/porteur, 2013 Flying Piegon path racer, 2014 Gazelle Toer Populair T8

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 396 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by old's'cool View Post
Well, if you're willing to build a custom wheel, I'd recommend the nearly indestructible Van Schotthorst Saphir stainless steel rim
I have those rims with 13 gauge spokes on my one dutch bike, "nearly indestructible" is correct.
kickstart is offline  
Old 03-19-16, 02:20 PM
  #4  
ammarolli
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Reykjavík
Posts: 194

Bikes: Trek Crossrip 2 2017, Cube Cruve Pro 2015 and Berlín Dutch Bike 3 speed 2014

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm not willing build a new wheels but I'm thinking about buying Fulcrum Red Power HP 29.r
ammarolli is offline  
Old 03-19-16, 02:27 PM
  #5  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,315 Times in 826 Posts
Consider the way you use them a wheel is a consumable , buy something adequate replace it as needed .

Hub? Shimano Is safe. as I guess that is he maker of your drivetrain.

I Have no clue as to Fulcrums spare parts availability where you are

if you are OK with just buying another whole wheel when that one goes DNF thats fine.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 03-20-16, 07:00 AM
  #6  
ammarolli
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Reykjavík
Posts: 194

Bikes: Trek Crossrip 2 2017, Cube Cruve Pro 2015 and Berlín Dutch Bike 3 speed 2014

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have 9 speed shimano cassette in the back.

The discs are 160mm put on the hub with 6 screws.

The fork needs 9mm qr and I'm not sure what size qr is in the back but i'm guessing i'ts 9mm as well. I think the fulcrum red power hp would work with my bike.

I have no clue weather there some bike store where I live that sells fulcrum wheels and spare parts but I know that the some bikes at the bike stores comes stock with fulcrum wheels. I's also easy to relatively fast to order spare parts online.

I've heard from guys that ride in the winter time that Shimano hubs goes really bad in the winter time here in Iceland, get all gunky and sticky from the salt and sand on the streets.

Last edited by ammarolli; 03-20-16 at 07:15 AM.
ammarolli is offline  
Old 03-20-16, 07:17 AM
  #7  
dunelt_1954
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 133

Bikes: 3 Speeds, DIY Recumbent Trike, Sun Tomahawk

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Salt eats any make. I second what fietsbob suggests, cheap 36 spoke wheel that can be replaced when kaput. Taylor Wheels in Germany seems to be inexpensive and decent.
dunelt_1954 is offline  
Old 03-20-16, 10:48 AM
  #8  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,315 Times in 826 Posts
Originally Posted by ammarolli View Post
I have 9 speed shimano cassette in the back.

The discs are 160mm put on the hub with 6 screws.

The fork needs 9mm qr and I'm not sure what size qr is in the back but i'm guessing i'ts 9mm as well. I think the fulcrum red power hp would work with my bike.

I have no clue weather there some bike store where I live that sells fulcrum wheels and spare parts but I know that the some bikes at the bike stores comes stock with fulcrum wheels. I's also easy to relatively fast to order spare parts online.

I've heard from guys that ride in the winter time that Shimano hubs goes really bad in the winter time here in Iceland, get all gunky and sticky from the salt and sand on the streets.
front axle, 9 diameter, is normal .. rear it's usually 10mm ..

I'd Recommend creating a place near a Fresh Water spigot to wash your Bike down more Often. Soap, Water, and Brushes .
fietsbob is offline  
Old 03-20-16, 03:24 PM
  #9  
ammarolli
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Reykjavík
Posts: 194

Bikes: Trek Crossrip 2 2017, Cube Cruve Pro 2015 and Berlín Dutch Bike 3 speed 2014

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
front axle, 9 diameter, is normal .. rear it's usually 10mm ..

I'd Recommend creating a place near a Fresh Water spigot to wash your Bike down more Often. Soap, Water, and Brushes .

Well I have a water hose in my garage and I have everything to clean my bike. I clean my bike regularly with muc off and I tend to rinse the bike after riding on salty streets or when it's get dirty. I think I might not have been careful enough around the rear hub and actually got some water inside the hub and therefore it have grinding sound coming out of the hub and i worn out.

Last edited by ammarolli; 03-20-16 at 03:38 PM.
ammarolli is offline  
Old 03-20-16, 04:02 PM
  #10  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,315 Times in 826 Posts
Shimano Hubs are pretty simple to clean and re grease ,,

some even cheaper ones are showing up on bikes with a rubber Boot over the bearings to keep stuff out.

so Go MTB even on a road Bike , for the rubber seals '29er' disc a MTB hub will do fine . get a wheel Built .

Last edited by fietsbob; 03-20-16 at 04:56 PM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 03-20-16, 04:44 PM
  #11  
ammarolli
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Reykjavík
Posts: 194

Bikes: Trek Crossrip 2 2017, Cube Cruve Pro 2015 and Berlín Dutch Bike 3 speed 2014

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm going to talk to my LBS Cube dealer tomorrow and see what they will offer.
ammarolli is offline  
Old 03-20-16, 04:55 PM
  #12  
gerv 
In the right lane
 
gerv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Des Moines
Posts: 9,565

Bikes: 1974 Huffy 3 speed

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by old's'cool View Post
Well, if you're willing to build a custom wheel, I'd recommend the nearly indestructible Van Schotthorst Saphir stainless steel rim
serrated brake surface - may contain swarf inside rim walls which can rattle.
Weight: 820g
That would convince me... I suppose these are great for braking too, especially in the rain.
gerv is offline  
Old 03-20-16, 07:16 PM
  #13  
old's'cool
curmudgineer
 
old's'cool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Chicago SW burbs
Posts: 4,365

Bikes: 2 many 2 fit here

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 240 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 33 Posts
Originally Posted by gerv View Post
That would convince me... I suppose these are great for braking too, especially in the rain.
My Saphir wheel build is very new and I haven't had occasion yet to try the wet braking; but dry is fine, about the same as with aluminum alloy rims. There is quite the high pitched buzz from the serrations when braking, that modulates according to speed (of course), but I don't find it objectionable.
old's'cool is offline  
Old 03-20-16, 10:26 PM
  #14  
chrislee99777
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 104
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm sorry I was not particularly aware of the terrain and climate in Iceland, so can not give you good advice.But you inspired me maybe I should be replaced with new tires to adapt to my city's environment.Very glad to see your thread.
chrislee99777 is offline  
Old 03-21-16, 08:26 PM
  #15  
gerv 
In the right lane
 
gerv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Des Moines
Posts: 9,565

Bikes: 1974 Huffy 3 speed

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by old's'cool View Post
My Saphir wheel build is very new and I haven't had occasion yet to try the wet braking; but dry is fine, about the same as with aluminum alloy rims. There is quite the high pitched buzz from the serrations when braking, that modulates according to speed (of course), but I don't find it objectionable.
Ok... I hope you like them. They do seem a little heavy... but I suppose that's a small price to pay for durability.
gerv is offline  
Old 03-22-16, 01:15 PM
  #16  
shlammed
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kingston, Ontario
Posts: 197

Bikes: Norco Bigfoot, Miyata 110, Giant TCR Advanced 0

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I will always choose the lightest wheel that I can for the way I ride. durability is only as good as your maintenance schedule, IMO.

Get a wheel built on a good quality, self serviceable hub (DT350 would be great) and some double butted spokes to a rim. if you need it to be stronger, higher spoke count would help over a heavier rim... again in my opinion. if your always bashing the rim off a curb or riding down stairs a slightly heavier rim might help.
shlammed is offline  
Old 03-22-16, 05:17 PM
  #17  
old's'cool
curmudgineer
 
old's'cool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Chicago SW burbs
Posts: 4,365

Bikes: 2 many 2 fit here

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 240 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 33 Posts
Originally Posted by gerv View Post
Ok... I hope you like them. They do seem a little heavy... but I suppose that's a small price to pay for durability.
I consciously made that trade-off, since I was in the market to upgrade from a rather tired set of alloy rims on that particular bike, and wanted wheels that would last the remaining lifetime of the bike, and probably mine as well.
Derailleur geared rear wheels are inherently weak anyway, due to dish; add commuting loads, high utilization and road hazards to that, and you have potential for warped wheels/broken spokes and other issues that may delay your trip and add maintenance time when back at home. Thus, for my heavy duty commuters, I'm happy to add a little weight in order to gain reliability and the peace of mind that comes with it.
BTW, my other main commuter bikes feature alloy rear rims, with 40 and 48 spoke counts. The 48 spoke wheel was actually originally spec'd for a tandem.
FWIW, these are all drop bar road bikes, which is the only way I roll, so a strength upgrade (at least on the rear) from the typical narrow alloy rims is usually in order, for commuting purposes.
old's'cool is offline  
Old 03-22-16, 05:26 PM
  #18  
tjspiel
Senior Member
 
tjspiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 8,097
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by old's'cool View Post
My Saphir wheel build is very new and I haven't had occasion yet to try the wet braking; but dry is fine, about the same as with aluminum alloy rims. There is quite the high pitched buzz from the serrations when braking, that modulates according to speed (of course), but I don't find it objectionable.
Had serrated steel rims on an old Peugeot. Wet weather braking was scary. Dry weather braking was just noisy. The serrated rims also ate up brake pads pretty fast. For disc brakes like the OP has you don't have those downsides but I'm not sure of a reason to choose stainless steel rims unless you're going for a particular look or period correctness.

Last edited by tjspiel; 03-22-16 at 05:34 PM.
tjspiel is offline  
Old 03-22-16, 07:17 PM
  #19  
old's'cool
curmudgineer
 
old's'cool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Chicago SW burbs
Posts: 4,365

Bikes: 2 many 2 fit here

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 240 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 33 Posts
Originally Posted by tjspiel View Post
Had serrated steel rims on an old Peugeot. Wet weather braking was scary. Dry weather braking was just noisy. The serrated rims also ate up brake pads pretty fast. For disc brakes like the OP has you don't have those downsides but I'm not sure of a reason to choose stainless steel rims unless you're going for a particular look or period correctness.
Indestructibility...: better corrosion resistance than chromed steel or aluminum alloy, and higher strength than aluminum alloy.
The Peugeot rims I've seen are dimpled, rather than serrated. Dimpling is a clever way to retain water rather than let it drain away.
I'd much rather replace my brake pads regularly (wear item) than, e.g. alloy rims, due to braking wear, or warping. That's just me... I'm not trying to convince you that my way is right for you; but if my info helps others, that would please me.
old's'cool is offline  
Old 03-23-16, 10:30 AM
  #20  
gsa103
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 4,401

Bikes: Bianchi Infinito (Celeste, of course)

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 752 Post(s)
Liked 103 Times in 76 Posts
Originally Posted by old's'cool View Post
Well, if you're willing to build a custom wheel, I'd recommend the nearly indestructible Van Schotthorst Saphir stainless steel rim
That rim literally weighs more than my entire rear wheel (minus cassette & tire).
gsa103 is offline  
Old 03-23-16, 10:34 AM
  #21  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,315 Times in 826 Posts
but it"s stainless steel .. logical application is a MoPed. eBike, .. or at lesast hub brakes.

why weight weenie everything ?
fietsbob is offline  
Old 03-23-16, 01:29 PM
  #22  
shlammed
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kingston, Ontario
Posts: 197

Bikes: Norco Bigfoot, Miyata 110, Giant TCR Advanced 0

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
weight weenie aside, you don't need it to be heavy as a tank to be reliable.

a good build of the rim and proper amount of spokes is more important than the actual rim, save some cheap aluminum rims.
Buy something nice, the metallurgy of aluminum rims drastically changes when you go from a bargain bin rim to a mid priced ($60-80/RIM).

This said, if you run any rim into a curb repeatedly your going to have a bad time. Riding technique will help in this case. It would be the same if you drove a car into a curb repeatedly. I wouldn't go out and buy solid stainless rims for my car if they were available just so I could practice poor technique. This is in no means directed at any individual since I don't know anyone here but its been my experience.


Plus, all of that rotating mass makes it a bear to accelerate. it feels fine when riding it, but when you get the lighter wheel set on you feel so free.
shlammed is offline  
Old 03-23-16, 03:31 PM
  #23  
tjspiel
Senior Member
 
tjspiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 8,097
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by old's'cool View Post
Indestructibility...: better corrosion resistance than chromed steel or aluminum alloy, and higher strength than aluminum alloy.
The Peugeot rims I've seen are dimpled, rather than serrated. Dimpling is a clever way to retain water rather than let it drain away.
I'd much rather replace my brake pads regularly (wear item) than, e.g. alloy rims, due to braking wear, or warping. That's just me... I'm not trying to convince you that my way is right for you; but if my info helps others, that would please me.
I've seen the dimpled variety too, but the ones I had were serrated and I as I said, wet weather braking was pretty bad, - not nearly as good as with a machined braking surface on an alloy wheel. If you're using hub or disc brakes that's not a problem though.

Stainless steel will rust. It happens to the brake rotors on my winter bike, yet I've had no corrosion problems with my alloy rims.

As far as strength and durability goes, a good, strong double walled alloy rim with a sufficient number of spokes would be as good or better than a traditional single walled steel rim (imo). Probably one of the biggest factors though is being built and tensioned properly. If the spokes on your wheel are breaking on a regular basis and/or it's constantly going out of true, - it probably has more to do with being poorly built and not being properly tensioned than it has to do with rim or spoke quality.

Agree though that a steel rim would suffer less from brake wear.
tjspiel is offline  
Old 03-23-16, 06:10 PM
  #24  
old's'cool
curmudgineer
 
old's'cool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Chicago SW burbs
Posts: 4,365

Bikes: 2 many 2 fit here

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 240 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 33 Posts
Originally Posted by tjspiel View Post
I've seen the dimpled variety too, but the ones I had were serrated and I as I said, wet weather braking was pretty bad...
Fair enough

Originally Posted by tjspiel View Post
Stainless steel will rust...
Yes. or otherwise corrode, or not, depending on the grade of stainless and the conditions to which it is subjected. I don't anticipate problems with my Saphir rims.

Originally Posted by tjspiel View Post
As far as strength and durability goes, a good, strong double walled alloy rim with a sufficient number of spokes would be as good...
Certainly competitive, I agree, and in fact, as I mentioned, two of my rugged wheels have aluminum alloy rims. The Saphir rims are double wall, by the way.
old's'cool is offline  
Old 03-24-16, 08:55 AM
  #25  
shlammed
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kingston, Ontario
Posts: 197

Bikes: Norco Bigfoot, Miyata 110, Giant TCR Advanced 0

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
we run alloy rims on our tandem. they are more than enough, but they are built with more spokes (32). Proper build and tension as mentioned is key.
shlammed is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
cormacf
Road Cycling
6
12-18-17 01:38 PM
MinnMan
Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational)
10
07-05-17 03:44 PM
dougphoto
Road Cycling
4
03-23-16 01:16 PM
santinuro
Commuting
20
06-30-15 12:26 PM
BROOKLINEBIKER
Commuting
6
11-11-10 10:28 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.