Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Is a suspension seat post worth it?

Notices
Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Is a suspension seat post worth it?

Old 04-06-16, 09:05 PM
  #1  
admrlawesome
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Is a suspension seat post worth it?

Again, I'm new. I really don't know a lot about bikes. Is a suspension seat post worth it? And, is there a great difference between brands? I'm not looking at is as a replacement for a rear suspension. Just something to take the edge off of the small bumps. I'm on a pretty nicely paved bike path for the most part. Thanks!
admrlawesome is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 09:21 PM
  #2  
kickstart
Senior Member
 
kickstart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Kent Wa.
Posts: 5,332

Bikes: 2005 Gazelle Golfo, 1935 Raleigh Sport, 1970 Robin Hood sport, 1974 Schwinn Continental, 1984 Ross MTB/porteur, 2013 Flying Piegon path racer, 2014 Gazelle Toer Populair T8

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 396 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by admrlawesome View Post
Again, I'm new. I really don't know a lot about bikes. Is a suspension seat post worth it? And, is there a great difference between brands? I'm not looking at is as a replacement for a rear suspension. Just something to take the edge off of the small bumps. I'm on a pretty nicely paved bike path for the most part. Thanks!
IMO, A traditional sprung saddle works better.
kickstart is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 09:27 PM
  #3  
admrlawesome
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Not a bad idea. I was looking at those as well. Is there anything I should really look for in that type of seat? Or, is there a particular brand you would recommend?
admrlawesome is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 09:40 PM
  #4  
techsensei
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 766
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
You will see a fair number of positive reviews for inexpensive suspension posts on Amazon, but long term, they all go bad ... over time the bushings inside wear, and the seat wobbles from side-to-side. So I agree with kickstart, get a sprung saddle instead.
techsensei is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 09:49 PM
  #5  
Kindaslow
Senior Member
 
Kindaslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Seattlish
Posts: 2,751

Bikes: SWorks Stumpy, Haibike Xduro RX, Crave SS

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 512 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
The Body Float seatpost is the one that works, and I have about 4,000 miles on my road bike version. Plus, it is sprung to your body weight and adjustable.

And, from someone who has owned sprung seats and the Body Float, the Body Float is far better.

By the way, it is not cheap...

https://www.cirruscycles.com

Last edited by Kindaslow; 04-06-16 at 09:56 PM.
Kindaslow is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 10:25 PM
  #6  
KBentley57
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Madison, AL
Posts: 693

Bikes: 2010 Felt DA, 2012/6 Felt F5, 2015 Felt AR FRD

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Since nobody has thrown it out - Maybe try a larger set of tires at a lower pressure? How much rattle are you trying to smooth over, say chip-seal or potholes?
KBentley57 is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 05:25 AM
  #7  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 5,811

Bikes: '71 Jeunet 640, '74 Fuji Special Road Racer, '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 940 Post(s)
Liked 554 Times in 318 Posts
Riding single track, rutted, rooty rock gardens? Get a full suspension bike.

Riding on pavement, groomed trails, MUPs, chipseal, or cinder? Get out of the saddle and use the legs as shock absorbers. I like the wider, lower pressure tire suggestion, too.
Phil_gretz is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 05:32 AM
  #8  
tclune
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Western MA
Posts: 216
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
My Specialized Expedition came without a suspension seat. The bike is basically a comfort bike -- you ride pretty upright with your weight on your seat. I got a cheap aftermarket suspension seat (it's some kind of bungee cord suspension that can be adjusted by twisting to the desired tension.) That was a few years ago. The bike gets a lot of abuse (I use it as my winter beater) and the suspension still operates like it did the day I got it. I wouldn't want that kind of seat on my touring bike, but it adds significant comfort to the ride on the Expedition. I don't recall the brand or where on the internet I got it. Sorry.
tclune is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 07:23 AM
  #9  
revcp 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA
Posts: 1,211

Bikes: 2017 Carbon Salsa Beagrease, 1988 Miyata Twelve Hundred built with Campagnolo Veloce, 1985 Trek 720, 1995 Specialized Stumpjumper M2 steel frame dropbar build, 1986 Centurion Ironman

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 252 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 34 Posts
Originally Posted by tclune View Post
My Specialized Expedition came without a suspension seat. The bike is basically a comfort bike -- you ride pretty upright with your weight on your seat...
This is a key point. I've never felt the need for suspension seatpost, but my bike with the most upright positioning is my fat bike, and on that I have 4" of rubber at low psi to take the bumps. On my other bikes I'm positioned such that using my knees up out of the saddle for suspension is a very natural thing. The bike I'm presently using as my commuter, a Surly Troll, has a Cambium C15 saddle, and I've found it really absorbs little road and trail irregularities well, even with 1.5" tires at 75 psi. So, as everyone has mentioned, there are many things you can do, but if I were riding upright at 65psi+ I might consider an inexpensive suspension post. I wouldn't actually get one, but I might consider it
__________________
Don't complain about the weather and cower in fear. It's all good weather. Just different.
revcp is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 07:44 AM
  #10  
locolobo13 
Senior Member
 
locolobo13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Phx, AZ
Posts: 1,763

Bikes: Trek Mtn Bike

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 158 Post(s)
Liked 470 Times in 156 Posts
A few years ago I bought a hybrid with the seat post suspension. I also have a mountain bike without tho it does have front suspension. I can't tell much difference.
locolobo13 is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 07:52 AM
  #11  
NYMXer
Senior Member
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Posts: 1,495

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Raleigh Tamland 1 and Giant Anthem X

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I put one on my fat bike, which has FS only. I put on a decent middle of the pricing seat post w suspension and ride quality has improved.
I would recommend one
NYMXer is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 08:22 AM
  #12  
bmthom.gis
Senior Member
 
bmthom.gis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Columbia, SC
Posts: 2,980

Bikes: 2014 Cannondale Synapse Carbon 4 Rival; 2014 Cannondale Trail 7 29; 1972 Schwinn Suburban, 1996 Proflex 756, 1987(?) Peugeot, Dahon Speed P8; 1979 Raleigh Competition GS; 1995 Stumpjumper M2 FS, 1978 Raleigh Sports, Schwinn Prologue

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I wouldn't waste my time or money on a suspension seat post. I had a Specialized Expedition (my first bike as an adult) and it had one on it. Wider tires running lower pressure, or getting out of the saddle and using your legs is what. I would recommend..and if you feel like you need more, a sprung saddle. Brooks Flyer is a terrific one. It's not cheap, but properly taken care of will last decades and the leather will mold to your posterior, like a good pair of hiking boots mold to your feet.
bmthom.gis is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 08:32 AM
  #13  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 42,567

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 194 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7319 Post(s)
Liked 927 Times in 586 Posts
Worth it to Who? You or Me?

You Pinch every Penny or have money burning a Hole in your pocket?


cane creek thud buster , i have 1 of each , long travel came on my Bike-Friday,

I replaced a zero setback post , A German Airwings that Koga, OEM, selected ..

with the CC ST, which does offer a little set back. both are adjusted for my weight thru elastomer changes..

Most of my other bikes I dont have any , just the long distance tour rigs.


$25.00 seat posts bear no resemblance to those costing $250.00

Last edited by fietsbob; 04-17-16 at 01:50 PM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 08:44 AM
  #14  
corrado33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Bozeman
Posts: 4,094

Bikes: 199? Landshark Roadshark, 198? Mondonico Diamond, 1987 Panasonic DX-5000, 1987 Bianchi Limited, Univega... Chrome..., 1989 Schwinn Woodlands, Motobecane USA Record, Raleigh Tokul 2

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1126 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Every suspension seatpost I've ever come across has wobbled. Whether it's side to side or up and down. Sure, most, if not all, of these were years old, but that's not the point. A wobbling saddle would drive me nuts. I have no idea if they were cheap or expensive ones, as I never bothered looking.

I think a proper saddle and a chamois would do you better.
corrado33 is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 08:56 AM
  #15  
gregjones 
Senior Member
 
gregjones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: West Georgia
Posts: 2,823

Bikes: K2 Mod 5.0 Roadie, Fuji Commuter

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bmthom.gis View Post
I wouldn't waste my time or money on a suspension seat post. I had a Specialized Expedition (my first bike as an adult) and it had one on it. Wider tires running lower pressure, or getting out of the saddle and using your legs is what I would recommend..
^^^^This^^^^
__________________
Current Bike Stages--Click PR Logo
PedalRoom
gregjones is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 09:18 AM
  #16  
Kindaslow
Senior Member
 
Kindaslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Seattlish
Posts: 2,751

Bikes: SWorks Stumpy, Haibike Xduro RX, Crave SS

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 512 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Clearly nobody here has tried the Body Float. Even though it is expensive, it is worth it.
Kindaslow is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 06:57 PM
  #17  
loky1179 
Senior Member
 
loky1179's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 963

Bikes: 2x Bianchi, 2x Specialized, 3x Schwinns

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 91 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Worth it to Who? You or Me?


cane creek thud buster , i have 1 of each , long travel came on my Bike-Friday,

I replaced a zero setback post , A German Airwings that Koga, OEM, selected ..

with the CC ST, which does offer a little set back. both are adjusted for my weight thru elastomer changes..

Most of my other bikes I dont have any , just the long distance tour rigs.
Good advice. Is it worth it to YOU??

I have a spinal curvature, which makes it impossible to sit on the seat squarely. This means that 70% of my weight is on my left sit bone. For me, definitely worth it.

Agree with Fietsbob, Thudbusters are great. I have two of the long travel posts. Probably overkill for commuting, but I love it. Every little curb cut, bump or expansion joint I ride over, and don't feel, I think to myself "that could have been my a$$!"
loky1179 is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 08:42 PM
  #18  
PaulRivers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 6,299
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 453 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Any suspension you put in the back will reduce your power. Rear suspension on mountain bikes (until you get into expensive stuff but that stuff just locks out the suspension when it's flat and only kicks in when it gets bumpy) kills you power.

The best solution as some people have said is usually better or fatter tires. Schwalbe Marathon Supreme's are built with comfort as their top priority:
Marathon Supreme HS 469 | Schwalbe North America

Above a certain point fatter tires are also going to make you a little slower, but that's where I'd start - generally fatter tires also do a much better job of absorbing bumps than suspension is able to.
PaulRivers is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 09:34 PM
  #19  
alan s 
Senior Member
 
alan s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 6,915
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1464 Post(s)
Liked 147 Times in 103 Posts
Not worth it. Neither are e-bikes.
alan s is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 11:31 PM
  #20  
ColonelSanders
Senior Member
 
ColonelSanders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 3,942

Bikes: 2017 Surly Troll with XT Drive Train, 2017 Merida Big Nine XT Edition, 2016 Giant Toughroad SLR 2, 1995 Trek 830

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1279 Post(s)
Liked 32 Times in 29 Posts
Originally Posted by Kindaslow View Post
Clearly nobody here has tried the Body Float. Even though it is expensive, it is worth it.
How long do the springs last before they need replacing?
ColonelSanders is offline  
Old 04-08-16, 01:01 AM
  #21  
Darth Lefty 
Disco Infiltrator
 
Darth Lefty's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Folsom CA
Posts: 10,876

Bikes: Schwinn Paramount, Salsa Timberjack, Diamondback Expert TG, Burley Samba

Mentioned: 64 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1956 Post(s)
Liked 521 Times in 361 Posts
Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
How long do the springs last before they need replacing?
Springs basically don't wear out unless they're junky. And for $250 those won't be. if that thing fails it will be fatigue. The pivots might wear out but since it's all under compression you'd have a hard time telling. Also, the page says they've been around since 2011 so the answer is probably "at least 5 years"

I'm not sure why it's better than a springer saddle and/or a cheap straight suspension post of the $15-30 variety found on inexpensive comfort bikes.
__________________
Genesis 49:16-17
Darth Lefty is offline  
Old 04-08-16, 01:18 AM
  #22  
ColonelSanders
Senior Member
 
ColonelSanders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 3,942

Bikes: 2017 Surly Troll with XT Drive Train, 2017 Merida Big Nine XT Edition, 2016 Giant Toughroad SLR 2, 1995 Trek 830

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1279 Post(s)
Liked 32 Times in 29 Posts
Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
Springs basically don't wear out unless they're junky. And for $250 those won't be. if that thing fails it will be fatigue. The pivots might wear out but since it's all under compression you'd have a hard time telling. Also, the page says they've been around since 2011 so the answer is probably "at least 5 years"

I'm not sure why it's better than a springer saddle and/or a cheap straight suspension post of the $15-30 variety found on inexpensive comfort bikes.
The way they list the springs on the website, it gives me the impression at least, that these springs are effectively consumable items, even if it is years in between replacement.
ColonelSanders is offline  
Old 04-08-16, 08:24 AM
  #23  
Kindaslow
Senior Member
 
Kindaslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Seattlish
Posts: 2,751

Bikes: SWorks Stumpy, Haibike Xduro RX, Crave SS

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 512 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
Springs basically don't wear out unless they're junky. And for $250 those won't be. if that thing fails it will be fatigue. The pivots might wear out but since it's all under compression you'd have a hard time telling. Also, the page says they've been around since 2011 so the answer is probably "at least 5 years"

I'm not sure why it's better than a springer saddle and/or a cheap straight suspension post of the $15-30 variety found on inexpensive comfort bikes.
I have had all three over the years. The spring seats are nice, but if your weight does not match the window of those springs, you are likely to get little benefit or bounced off. The less expensive seatposts, in my opinion, felt about the same for me. In both cases, they were very obvious during the ride, yet better than nothing on some bikes. The Body Float is amazing, in that it just disappears under you once the adjusting is done. On my commuter bike it saves my back and butt from those unseen holes and bumps (and, during the winter, my commutes are often in the dark and some things go unseen). On my fully rigid MTB it really saves my back and butt at times, given I am not standing 100% of the time and sometimes things just sneak up when you have been out riding for hours and are tired. In a nutshell, I have two of these on two different types of bikes and they are the best I have ever experienced.
Kindaslow is offline  
Old 04-08-16, 08:29 AM
  #24  
Kindaslow
Senior Member
 
Kindaslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Seattlish
Posts: 2,751

Bikes: SWorks Stumpy, Haibike Xduro RX, Crave SS

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 512 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
The way they list the springs on the website, it gives me the impression at least, that these springs are effectively consumable items, even if it is years in between replacement.
They are small springs tasked with doing a lot of work, so they might fatigue from so many "cycles." I have about 1 year and 4-5k miles on the one. The other is about 6 months and maybe 30 MTB rides of 2-4 hours. And, there are no obvious signs of wear on either of them.
Kindaslow is offline  
Old 04-08-16, 08:40 AM
  #25  
gsa103
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 4,148

Bikes: Bianchi Infinito (Celeste, of course)

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 630 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
Any suspension you put in the back will reduce your power. Rear suspension on mountain bikes (until you get into expensive stuff but that stuff just locks out the suspension when it's flat and only kicks in when it gets bumpy) kills you power.
Suspension seatposts shouldn't have any effect on power (just more weight). Pedaling forces wouldn't compress the seat at all (if anything they lift you). Rear frame suspension is different because the downstroke also causes the rear suspension to compress. Even then its clearly possible to have modest suspension without much power impact (Roubaix, Domane, K8-s, etc).
gsa103 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.