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Public Repair Stands

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Public Repair Stands

Old 05-01-16, 05:30 PM
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Leo H.
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Public Repair Stands

I'm looking to select a public workstation for our new bike parking structure and I'd appreciate any comments from riders who have used them and what they like or didn't like about the one you have access to.

Our new badge access, camera'd structure:

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Old 05-01-16, 06:43 PM
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From my experience, the pump always sucks, and that gets used the most I would say. Condensation always ends up building up in the gauge and eventually it quits working. Now, being in Nevada, you don't have to worry about this haha. One thing that I might want to suggest for you is to place it in the back of the caged area out of the sun. If you do need to work on your bike or pump your tires, the shade will definitely be nice.

Oh, and just to add to this.....I am totally jealous of this set up. Would love to see this implemented at the hospital I work at.
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Old 05-01-16, 07:08 PM
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My only suggestion (other than the shade idea) would be to make sure the cables securing the tools are long enough to EASILY reach wherever needed.
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Old 05-01-16, 09:37 PM
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We had one locally on one of my normal routes. I went to check it out and all the tools were stolen or broken as a result of vandalism. Your structure looks pretty secure though so I don't imagine that will be a problem.

A couple of small suggestions: make sure there is a tray with good lips to hold nuts, bolts, etc. and maybe a magnet on a stick to help track down those nuts, bolts, etc. that fall, bounce once on the ground, then disappear into the aether.
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Old 05-01-16, 09:45 PM
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There is a Fixit stand right outside my co-op; it was installed by the city. Some people use it, and even we use it when the shop is overflowing with customers. But primarily the pump is what gets used. The pump head has been broken for months now. Supposedly new parts were going to be sent, but that hasn't happened. I kept having to go outside and tell people who attempted to use it that is was broken. We eventually chained up one of our own pumps out there.
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Old 05-01-16, 09:52 PM
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Good idea about the magnetic tray. I'm not concerned about the tools disappearing but that's a good point to watch as to how the tools are attached. One person advised me, their stand was placed too close to the wall and that made it awkward to get at the tethered tools on that model repair stand.
My reflex is to place the stand where the lockers now are, so that during the day, you'll at least have some daylight to use. I don't know when the spotlight comes on at night, that's something good to find out.
Thanks for the comments about the pumps. MAN! They are spendy!! I definitely want to be sure we get one that is going to last more than a year. I don't expect it to get used much more than weekly, but we'll see. I agree, this shelter has turned out to be very nice. Plans are in the works to have an artist paint a bicycle theme across the sides and on the roof, since it is visible from the hospital cafeteria windows on the floor above.
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Old 05-01-16, 10:12 PM
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Originally Posted by TenSpeedV2 View Post
From my experience, the pump always sucks, and that gets used the most I would say.
This is just in the cage for commuters?

Maybe a pump on a chain? Add a few tire irons on a chain too, if you want.
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Old 05-02-16, 07:20 AM
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My thoughts - avoid the cheapest tools out there. You shouldn't really need all that much - I would think a full set or so of hex wrenches, phillips and slotted screwdriver, needlenose pliers, and adjustable wrench, a chain tool, tire levers, and a pump would probably be all you need. A ratchet set is always nice as well, but often not necessary. I don't see any reason to need cone wrenches or bottom bracket tools if this is just for employees to make some quick repairs, unless you want to provide them.

Since you have badge access, I am going to guess you have a security office, as well? If so, a nice amenity would be to stock up on some common size tubes that someone who needed one could purchase, or take. I wouldn't stock many, but someone needing an emergency tube would sure appreciate having access to one if needed.
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Old 05-02-16, 08:22 AM
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We had a relatively big thread about this a while back. I think I started it. Let me see if I can find it.
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Old 05-02-16, 09:54 AM
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Originally Posted by bmthom.gis View Post
My thoughts - avoid the cheapest tools out there. You shouldn't really need all that much - I would think a full set or so of hex wrenches, phillips and slotted screwdriver, needlenose pliers, and adjustable wrench, a chain tool, tire levers, and a pump would probably be all you need. A ratchet set is always nice as well, but often not necessary. I don't see any reason to need cone wrenches or bottom bracket tools if this is just for employees to make some quick repairs, unless you want to provide them.

Since you have badge access, I am going to guess you have a security office, as well? If so, a nice amenity would be to stock up on some common size tubes that someone who needed one could purchase, or take. I wouldn't stock many, but someone needing an emergency tube would sure appreciate having access to one if needed.
The tubes are a great idea.

I still think one might simply need a pump.

However, controlled access, one might be best off just building a tool kit / stand. Buy your favorite Park Professional tool stand. Tie a set of tools to it, folding Allen wrenches, screwdrivers, and 15mm wrench?

Then if you really want people to work on their bikes, build a full tool set. Cassette tools, freewheel tools, cone wrenches, etc. Then have a check in/check out policy at the security desk.

I would guess that most use would simply be commuters, and not a lot of people dragging bikes from home to work on them, but who knows.
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Old 05-02-16, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
The tubes are a great idea.

I still think one might simply need a pump.

However, controlled access, one might be best off just building a tool kit / stand. Buy your favorite Park Professional tool stand. Tie a set of tools to it, folding Allen wrenches, screwdrivers, and 15mm wrench?

Then if you really want people to work on their bikes, build a full tool set. Cassette tools, freewheel tools, cone wrenches, etc. Then have a check in/check out policy at the security desk.

I would guess that most use would simply be commuters, and not a lot of people dragging bikes from home to work on them, but who knows.
I was thinking just commuters, too. Provide some basic tools to get back on the road if there is a mechanical suffered, or a quick adjustment needs to be made...but I think mostly it would just be a pump that's needed 9/10 times. I have dug into the toolbox at my work to make some small adjustments or change out some brake pads, but all I needed was an allen key and an adjustable wrench. I don't really even see a need for a work stand unless it's an amenity for people to come by on their off time to do some serious wrenching. Not saying that it wouldn't be a great thing to have, but for most quick repairs isn't needed.
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Old 05-02-16, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by bmthom.gis View Post
I don't really even see a need for a work stand unless it's an amenity for people to come by on their off time to do some serious wrenching. Not saying that it wouldn't be a great thing to have, but for most quick repairs isn't needed.
Much of my work on bikes has been at ground level. Perhaps the work stand helps a bit with new new indexed gearing systems.

And, in a professional office, people might not like getting their hands and clothes dirty.

One big thing might be PUBLICITY, even if the stuff doesn't see heavy use. Show everyone that the office takes bike commuting seriously.

I assume warm water and plumbing is not available. Goop can be used dry, so a Goop dispenser + paper towels? And/Or put Goop and/or Borax into a close public restroom for cleanup after working on the bike (or after a hard commute).

Rubber Gloves?

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Old 05-02-16, 10:45 AM
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Some Places in Europe have wall mounted Bike stands at airports that see a lot of cycle tourist arrivals.
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Old 05-02-16, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
We had a relatively big thread about this a while back. I think I started it. Let me see if I can find it.
Sweet! Thank you very much for looking that up.
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Old 05-02-16, 02:31 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
This is just in the cage for commuters?

Maybe a pump on a chain? Add a few tire irons on a chain too, if you want.
Since this set up is pretty much hands off, I think that's the motivation for the folks overseeing this project to make it idiot proof as much as possible. My original proposal was to have a sign up for the people using it at this facility to offer to stock it with a few tools, tubes and an air pump or two, of their own effort. When someone in this committee came across the picture of the outdoor repair stand, things took off from there. I saw those originally and wouldn't have thought to ask for another 1 large for a pump and repair stand, so I'm not fighting their intentions. Just going with the corporate flow.
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Old 05-02-16, 02:33 PM
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Here was this chain:
http://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-me...ns-needed.html

But, Nevada shouldn't have that big of an issue with rust in a covered/enclosed bike locker.
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Old 05-02-16, 02:38 PM
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Originally Posted by bmthom.gis View Post
My thoughts - avoid the cheapest tools out there. You shouldn't really need all that much - I would think a full set or so of hex wrenches, phillips and slotted screwdriver, needlenose pliers, and adjustable wrench, a chain tool, tire levers, and a pump would probably be all you need. A ratchet set is always nice as well, but often not necessary. I don't see any reason to need cone wrenches or bottom bracket tools if this is just for employees to make some quick repairs, unless you want to provide them.

Since you have badge access, I am going to guess you have a security office, as well? If so, a nice amenity would be to stock up on some common size tubes that someone who needed one could purchase, or take. I wouldn't stock many, but someone needing an emergency tube would sure appreciate having access to one if needed.
Well, that was one of the ideas I was hoping to learn from users of these public stands. I would assume the tools they have attached are going to be more rugged than finely finished. The expectation is, the tools are likely for simple fixes to get you home, flats, etc. I'm also keeping in mind that most people using this repair stand now and in the near future, are going to be new to cycle commuting, so I don't anticipate it turning into a weekend mechanic habit. I do like the idea on the stands that they have QR links to videos for basic bike repairs. As I pitch this, that's a feature I can advertise to help new riders cycling to work.
I think the tubes are something regular riders can offer to bring in an extra or two to leave in one of the lockers. For those riders who aren't up to speed with carrying extra tools, pump and tubes with them yet.
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Old 05-02-16, 02:45 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Here was this chain:
http://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-me...ns-needed.html

But, Nevada shouldn't have that big of an issue with rust in a covered/enclosed bike locker.
No, we shouldn't, BUT, I am glad to learn of this issue to be aware of in the future. I don't ride to this facility, but we are planning on engaging 1 or 2 regular riders who will be using this to monitor things like the stand, tubes, general issues and this can be something to be added to the maintenance list.
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Old 05-02-16, 02:45 PM
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Have the powers above you seen the price tag? Those repair stands can be extraordinarily expensive. In excess of $1000 for a stand.

I found this stand up in Portland.


It seemed nice enough. I tried out the pump. Presta wouldn't work for me, but Schrader (plus my adapter) was just fine.

I just see it as overkill. And I might prefer a standard shop stand if it was in a secure area.
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Old 05-02-16, 10:54 PM
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Yes they did. This route is their suggestion so I'm not tilting at any windmills. I do think the convenience of the tools and the QR instruction avenue is likely attractive to riders not familiar with what to do, so, as a lure/training wheel for new riders...along with the pretty bling factor, I think it's part of the investment in installing a gadget like this in a setting like this.
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Old 05-03-16, 12:25 AM
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In my city. DIY cheap one:

U Novom Sadu javni ?tand za popravku bicikala - 2Bike.rs
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Old 05-03-16, 09:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Slaninar View Post
Those are a really good idea, i'd use it.. Not often but would really be good for for those twice yearly repairs..maybe even take a picnic lunch out to and do some major stuff..
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Old 05-03-16, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by heywood View Post
Those are a really good idea, i'd use it.. Not often but would really be good for for those twice yearly repairs..maybe even take a picnic lunch out to and do some major stuff..


They are put in few public places where lots of people come to by bikes - for emergency on site fixes.
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Old 05-03-16, 11:19 AM
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How close is the bike shack to the security desk? I ask because the solution that's been implemented at my workplace is to just have a set of tools at the security desk available for the asking. No need to tether them. I don't know how often they get used. They have a pump, but I've opted to leave a pump of my own at my desk because my desk is closer to where I park the bike than the security desk is (I don't come in the main doors).

Most people who know how to fix their bike with basic tools are going to carry a multitool with them. If you want to be helpful, you really need to offer better tools for cases when the multitool isn't cutting it. For instance, my multitool has a chain tool and a spoke wrench, but they are kind of awkward to use. In my garage, I always prefer a proper chain tool and a good four-sided spoke wrench. It's kind of the same concept as the pump. I carry a small pump with me, but given the choice I'd much rather use a proper floor pump. My wish list would be (in this order of priority):

A high quality floor pump that supports presta and schraeder valves
Kool Stop tire jack (makes a huge difference with difficult to mount tires)
Park CT-4.3 chain tool (CT-3.2 would be OK)
Abbey Bike Tools dual sided Crombie with chain whip (for cassette and brake lockrings)
P-handled 4, 5 and 6 mm hex wrenches

As for the repair stand, I'd suggest something like the Park PCS-10. You're telling people that this shack is a secure place to leave their bike. If you believe that, you should have no problem leaving a portable repair stand there. If you have the budget for something like one of Park's pro repair stands that mount more permanently to the floor, all the better. Just don't spend a fortune on something that isn't functional.

Finally, I can't help but notice that the two bikes pictured in your shack are at the ends of the rack. That's not coincidental. That type of rack isn't inviting to anyone who cares about their bike. The ends approximate something better.
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Old 05-03-16, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
Finally, I can't help but notice that the two bikes pictured in your shack are at the ends of the rack. That's not coincidental. That type of rack isn't inviting to anyone who cares about their bike. The ends approximate something better.


It depends on how secure the shack is, and perhaps how tightly bikes are jammed in there.

I think there was a discussion earlier. Wheels are pretty strong unless someone is smashing the bikes. But, it is difficult to reach that type of a rack with a U-Lock. A cable lock will work, but it can also be a stretch.

Our local Walmart uses a wheel lock with rubber cushions + swing arm that I like (I've meant to get photos. Maybe next time).

Those wiggle bike racks, or whatever they're called are popular, perhaps because they are easy to snag a lock to. Not necessarily the easiest on a bike's paint though.
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