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Recommend a bike for newbie

Old 10-09-17, 11:54 AM
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justabrowsing
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Recommend a bike for newbie

I need help in buying a bicycle for daily commute. My commute is around 10 miles each way. I'm new to bicycle commuting and don't have much idea on different styles(I did read about them, but too much info!).

Issue is that half of my commute (around 4-5 miles) is on paved roads and remaining half is on a trail(please refer attached photos). I'm not sure on which bicycle to buy. I may not be using bicycle during rainy season(mainly due to the trail roads. It will become very muddier). Also, I'm very concerned about flats. Not sure whether I'll be able to change tubes in the middle (those solid tires, tannus, sounds awesome).

----

My budget is around $1000. Though I might increase if electric ones are recommended.

Thanks!
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Old 10-11-17, 09:16 AM
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fietsbob 
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#1, find a Pro Independent, Bike shop, then buy a bike there. they can help fill in for your lack of experience.
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Old 10-11-17, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
#1, find a Pro Independent, Bike shop, then buy a bike there. they can help fill in for your lack of experience.
+1 that's the best way to do it when you're starting. you'll also get service and the like.
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Old 10-11-17, 03:53 PM
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I grew up in shops and I will recommend them first all day long. I do also recommend looking into the Priority Continuum. It is a bike that has many features that you cannot get for the price at a shop. It also checks your boxes and should not have issues with your terrain. I would recommend that if you do not know how to build a bike please find a shop to bring it to. They may charge you $50-100 but it is best to have it put together by someone who knows what they are doing. It is not hard to do but if you have any doubt bring it to a shop. https://www.prioritybicycles.com/products/continuumonyx
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Old 10-11-17, 04:17 PM
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Going to a bike that deals in commuter bikes is the way to go. Personally, I commute daily on my touring bike, tho if I were just getting into it, I'd want something lighter, maybe like the Handsome Devil. But go into a shop and let them help you find one that'll fit your needs and your body. You'll likely spend a bit more money than getting from a bike company that sells consumer-direct, but the value of being able to try the bike and have someone listen to your needs and make recommendations, answering all your questions, not to mention creating a relationship with the people who are going to be doing your service, is worth the few more dollars you may end up paying. You'll end up with a bike that's better for you personally in any case.
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Old 10-11-17, 04:38 PM
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One thing to note, as long as you don't get pinch flats, then gravel doesn't cause flats. I.E. get at least moderate volume tires (28mm or greater). Flats are often from glass or radial tire wires, both often more common on paved roads.

That canal trail looks well groomed, and you likely can ride anything on it, from road bikes to hybrids to MTBs. Cyclocross bicycles?

What does the trail look like after it rains? Fenders may not be a bad idea if you expect to ride when it is raining, or shortly after it rained.

I have Tannus tires on my winter road bike (700x23). They are a bit odd. The weight isn't so different from a rugged road tire like a Schwalbe Marathon Plus. I think a little extra road buzz from vibration. And they feel a little slow, bit it is hard to prove. Their wider tires might be different. I don't think I'd feel comfortable riding my tires on dirt for 10 miles a day.
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Old 10-14-17, 05:23 PM
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justabrowsing
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Bought Giant escape 1

Thanks a lot for the feedback.

I went to a local bike shop and told them all the details. And the guy in the shop suggested giant escape 1. They had other models like cannondale (and something else), but he said escape bike has pretty sweet price point and similar bike in cannondale costs more.

Anyway, I test rode it and it was fine. So, bought it. Swapped the seat/saddle as it was very hard.

Drove around 5 miles from shop to home and it was good.

Again thanks for the feedback.
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Old 10-15-17, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by justabrowsing View Post
Thanks a lot for the feedback.

I went to a local bike shop and told them all the details. And the guy in the shop suggested giant escape 1. They had other models like cannondale (and something else), but he said escape bike has pretty sweet price point and similar bike in cannondale costs more.

Anyway, I test rode it and it was fine. So, bought it. Swapped the seat/saddle as it was very hard.

Drove around 5 miles from shop to home and it was good.

Again thanks for the feedback.
That looks like a good commuter and good MSRP.
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Old 10-22-17, 06:36 AM
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Originally Posted by justabrowsing View Post
Thanks a lot for the feedback.

I went to a local bike shop and told them all the details. And the guy in the shop suggested giant escape 1. They had other models like cannondale (and something else), but he said escape bike has pretty sweet price point and similar bike in cannondale costs more.

Anyway, I test rode it and it was fine. So, bought it. Swapped the seat/saddle as it was very hard.

Drove around 5 miles from shop to home and it was good.

Again thanks for the feedback.
Nice choice, I got the Escape 3 with hybrid tires as a beginning commuter and it's served me well, 1.5 years daily.
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Old 10-22-17, 07:27 AM
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If you go outside the US you'll see that most people ride upright city bikes for a commute like yours. And that there are massively higher numbers of people riding bicycles for transportation rather than the recreational bikes and riding more common in the US.

City Bikes: City Bikes | LocalMile

While there are increasing numbers of shops selling these in the US, they can still be hard to find in some cities. Where are you located? Is your ride fairly flat like the photo shows or are there some larger hills to climb?

As to flats, one of the benefits of city bikes is a bit fatter tire. Schwalbe Marathon tires on these rarely get flats and are generally more reliable and smoother to ride than the thinner tyres on road or hybrid bikes. Some fat-tire bikes likely have a bit better reliability from a flat perspective though.
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Old 10-22-17, 09:12 AM
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escapes are a terrific value and depending on what you eventually want to do they can be outfitted for almost anything including full on loaded touring. you have chosen well my friend!
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