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Schwalbe Tires - studded and general

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Schwalbe Tires - studded and general

Old 12-14-18, 03:51 PM
  #51  
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Damn. Nice brake track. What type of rim is that. Also, those Winters look a little old by the typeface?
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Old 12-14-18, 04:48 PM
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The beads on these Winter Pluses are really really tight. As tempted as I was to reach for a tire lever on mine, and being 2nd hand to begin with, I wonder if there was maybe an incident with the bead somewhere in that tire’s past. Maybe somebody wasn’t so patient
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Old 12-14-18, 07:35 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
It strikes me odd that people talk about how good a tire's grip is. I can't imagine how you can do that without being at the limit of grip as the tire begins to give way. Presumably, you change your stance so you don't wipe out, and that's fine, but isn't that a little reckless on a two-wheel machine?
I'm not sure I understand this question. Are you saying that you never feel the tires slip when you're riding? Obviously that's something to be avoided, but it happens if you ride in enough diverse conditions and I think most commuters do at least once in a while. (Incidentally, one of the reasons I recommend cyclocross racing for even people who aren't interested in racing is that you get to spend an awful lot of time feeling your tires slide, and so when it happens in normal riding you're prepared and can handle small slips.)

Usually when my tires slip it's in conditions that no stud-free tire would prevent -- wet leaves, loose gravel, mud on the pavement, black ice, etc. The grip comes into play when you get back onto a solid surface. You can feel a difference in how quickly the tire reengages. I don't think any tire on the market would slip on dry, smooth pavement, but add some water and it starts to become a possibility. Depending on how a tire responds in the unpreventable slipping conditions, I may be less cautious when riding on roads that are just wet.
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Old 12-14-18, 08:55 PM
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Good points. When I think of grip I also think of cornering. Maybe especially cornering, as I don’t really put enough power to the pedals to lose rear traction on the straight. I’ve had lots of tires that did OK on dry pavement and loose gravel and sand but were really squirrely on clean wet asphalt/concrete.
Those Armadillo tires had good grip on everything I tried them on, wet and dry. The roads were wet all day today, and the marathon winter pluses do fine. Just have to slow down for turns.
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Old 12-14-18, 11:44 PM
  #55  
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Yes I feel my tires slip when things are wet or slippery, but I don't have a sense of which tires slip more under a given condition. Maybe my technique is different from others. I was riding with a friend who warmed me sternly about the wet leaves on the paved trail. He told me to take it super easy. He was really scared of flipping and falling, but I wasn't. Then later we realized that he's heavy and I'm light, and maybe that has something to do with it. Maybe my reflexes are good enough. But I can't remember slipping on wet pavement when there is nothing loose on it.
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Old 12-15-18, 06:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Phamilton View Post
The beads on these Winter Pluses are really really tight. As tempted as I was to reach for a tire lever on mine, and being 2nd hand to begin with, I wonder if there was maybe an incident with the bead somewhere in that tire’s past. Maybe somebody wasn’t so patient
yeah & who knows, might have been me but I never broke a wire bead before or after that. they were quite old when I bought them. the tubes were still in them but they were kinda stuck to the inside of the tires. I had to peel them out & wipe them down before installing them w new tubes

I do take precautions especially w tuff tires like making sure one side is deep in the channel then strap it in place. I also carry those straps so I can do the same on the road



also use a CRANKBROTHERs Crank Brothers Speedier Lever which is useful getting them off & on



and I'm now using a Kool Stop Tire Bead Jack when I'm working on tuff tires



I tried using it on my current 29x2" Marathon winters but it's not a wide enough tool. turns out I didn't need it anyway. 29er tires seem easier to mount in general

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Old 12-15-18, 07:01 AM
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Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post
Damn. Nice brake track. What type of rim is that. Also, those Winters look a little old by the typeface?




seem to be standard issue on all our Trek FXs (4) but my road bike (diff. brand) has a groove like that too
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Old 12-15-18, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post




seem to be standard issue on all our Trek FXs (4) but my road bike (diff. brand) has a groove like that too
It's mandatory on all EU bikes from what I remember. A rim wear indicator track.
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Old 12-17-18, 12:45 PM
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Schwalbe Marathon

Have EZIP electric bike and almost gave up because of flats-rear is timely work -Then I tried Marathon mondial evolution DD and will never use anything else-does not seem heavy to me and on my 3rd pair with 1 flat total. Ride approx 3500 miles per year as this is my only transportation-live in warm Florida-USA. As all the weight is rear on my bike I decided to try Schwalbe Kojak on the front and have same opinion (never anything else) at first I thought this was too expensive for a bike tire compared to what I was used to paying--WAS I EVER WRONG worth every penny!
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Old 12-17-18, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by hingiswins View Post
Have EZIP electric bike and almost gave up because of flats-rear is timely work -Then I tried Marathon mondial evolution DD and will never use anything else-does not seem heavy to me and on my 3rd pair with 1 flat total. Ride approx 3500 miles per year as this is my only transportation-live in warm Florida-USA. As all the weight is rear on my bike I decided to try Schwalbe Kojak on the front and have same opinion (never anything else) at first I thought this was too expensive for a bike tire compared to what I was used to paying--WAS I EVER WRONG worth every penny!
Looks like it's not super heavy at around 600g but rolling resistance appears higher than other Marathon versions. Maybe less noticeable with electric power?

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Old 12-17-18, 01:37 PM
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Totally agree with Schwalbe tires!

Originally Posted by hingiswins View Post
Have EZIP electric bike and almost gave up because of flats-rear is timely work -Then I tried Marathon mondial evolution DD and will never use anything else-does not seem heavy to me and on my 3rd pair with 1 flat total. Ride approx 3500 miles per year as this is my only transportation-live in warm Florida-USA. As all the weight is rear on my bike I decided to try Schwalbe Kojak on the front and have same opinion (never anything else) at first I thought this was too expensive for a bike tire compared to what I was used to paying--WAS I EVER WRONG worth every penny!
I have an Izip E-3 Dash and I had two flats in my first 10 tens or so. I got a pair of Schwalbe Marathon Greenbelt (e-bike ready) tires off eBay for $78 delivered to me in Tampa, FL. One year and over 3800 miles later I have had no flats, and the tires still look new. I keep them at 50 psi, and the ride is smooth. They seem to roll just as fast as the Kenda tires that were on there.
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Old 12-17-18, 03:10 PM
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Yes, I'd expect rolling resistance to matter less with an ebike.
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Old 12-17-18, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
yes, i'd expect rolling resistance to matter less with an ebike.
but have you tried it, noglider? Have you tried it!!!???

😂😜

Edit: bummer, wouldn’t let me use all caps
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Old 12-17-18, 05:37 PM
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Nope. I'm sitting in an easy chair enjoying my central heating. What do I know about bikes?
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Old 12-17-18, 06:14 PM
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I actually went against my word and put the street tires back on this weekend. Wanted to see what it was like after riding the studs for a week. Street tires feel lighter, for sure, and FEEL faster but I’m not so sure that they’re faster. Maybe going to a studded 35mm tire from a skinwall 28mm would give a more impressive difference.

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Old 12-17-18, 08:43 PM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post
The things on Rugby Road looked like cobblestones to me - much worse than brick!
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Old 12-17-18, 09:57 PM
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I have used Marathons and then Marathon Pluses for a fairly long time, both on my Bianchi Volpe tourer and on my Bike Friday New World Tourer. The Bianchi does a fair bit of commuting, the New World Tourer sits in a basement in Sweden for 10 months a year and then gets ridden between 1,000 and 6,000 km in the remaining 2 months. In 2004 I started out with a puncture proof set of Contis (can't remember the exact name) on what turned out to be a 6,300 mile ride on the Bianchi. At about mile 5000 the tread wore through to show the Teflon barrier beneath it: the tread was not bonded to the Teflon. Within about 60 miles the entire tread had separated off and shed itself by the side of the road. This happened in the middle of Newfoundland, and in those days I was carrying about 45 lbs of gear plus 220 lbs of me (now, unfortunately, its 240 lbs of me and 25 lbs of gear - yer just can't win at my age!). The other Conti tire failed in rural Alaska a couple of years later about 600 miles into a 500 mile ride. I should explain that I'm a cheapskate and ride tires down to the canvas: I also rode the 2nd Conti for darn near 1000 miles knowing the sidewall was split - I just carried a spare ready for the day it died. The problem was that my hands were frostbitten when it died (due to another cheapskate episode - riding 30 miles fast after dusk in freezing temperatures to avoid having to pay for a cabin or camp). I had a terrible time getting the old tire off and the new one on.

The Marathon Pluses on my Bianchi have been ridden at least 10,000 miles each (basically from Alaska to Mexico and from Gibraltar around the coasts of Europe to Belfast and Sczezcsyn (Stettin), Poland. One is now threadbare but just won't wear out. I had two punctures on one tire within 20 minutes on the road to Homer, AK: clearly I failed to find the source of the first one. I had one puncture on the other as I was riding into Houston on I-59: the wire from a shed truck tire went right through the puncture-proofing: the only thing that will kill a Marathon Plus! They've been on the bike for about 8 years: the rubber in the sidewall is a bit cracked, but no sign of impending failure (unlike the Coti, which I admit I probably pumped too hard at some point). They been over all sorts of cobbled roads in Europe, and pushed/ridden along forest roads in Portugal made of the butt ends of pine logs packed together and buried in sand. I got caught in a 'orrible thunderstorm on the Top of the World Highway 40 miles out of Dawson City in a year when the entire thing was ground up for re-surfacing. The abrasive grit tore all my clothes to shreds and caused the brake shoes to practically wear through the rim of my rear wheel (it's a 5,000 ft descent), but the Schwalbes did not show a sign of wear.

The Marathon pluses on the Bike Friday have been to Germany to Georgia, Germany to beyond Moscow and back to Scotland and then Sweden, from Sweden to Sicily and from Greece to Italy up the Dalmatian Coast: about another ten thousand miles. I have replaced one tire with a ?Chinese brand (the Schwalbes were not available in remote France), so one has done over 10,000 miles and the other did about 8,000 miles. It was on the rear for some punishing roads in Belgium and France, and some off-road riding along the banks of the Volga in Russia. I have had one puncture, in France, when in a hurry to get to a hostel by the deadline (this is the reason why I hate punctures: they always happen at the wrong time - when you're illegally riding a freeway, or on the gravel Alaska Highway miles from anywhere at nightfall, etc). As people have said, the Marathon + is hard to get off a wheel, ESPECIALLY a 20" wheel - I broke 2 tire levers on the change in France.

Before I bought the Friday, I rented a Brompton to tour the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, to see whether it was better than the Friday. It's a great Bike: you have a relatively low center of gravity when the winds howling off the Atlantic at 70 mph. There are two problems: one, don't even THINK of riding across a cattle guard on a Brompton, and two, it cost me 3 tire levers and two hotel spoons to get the @!#$% tire off that 16" wheel when I got a flat. The Brompton tires were some brand I didn't recognize. So I think the difficulty of changing a tire is mostly related to the wheel size.

On the subject or riding comfort and speed: I had the Friday with Marathons up to 47 mph riding a brand-new freeway past the site of Stalin's birthplace 4 years ago - slight downgrade, and totally estupido of me, I know. I haven't noticed any difference between the Marathon+ and the Chinese tire on the Friday. I've got a Trek with racing tires, and though they are completely different I wouldn't say they "feel" faster - if that means anything. They just get a heckuva lot of punctures - like one every 200 miles. I'm getting old enough (77) now that uphill is uphill with any kind of tire or bike, and fiddling around with a wheel in a crouched position by the side of road is just agony! But I LOVE my Schwalbe Marathon pluses: sorry it's taken so many words to tell you that!
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Old 12-17-18, 11:37 PM
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The Marathon Touring tires (Greenguard) are an excellent commuter. I have used these for the last few years and gotten excellent treadwear as well as great puncture protection. The last set on my main commuter gave me about 5,000 miles on the rear tire, and 8000 on the front tire. In that time, I believe I had one flat on the rear from a nail. Rolling resistance on these tires is minimal, and they are a smooth riding tire as well. The touring version of the Marathon Tire is available in many sizes as well. I also run the Marathon Winter plus tires in the winter, and when I switch back to the touring tires in the spring, it feels nimble like a race bike!
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Old 12-18-18, 01:46 AM
  #69  
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Originally Posted by JohnBerry View Post
The things on Rugby Road looked like cobblestones to me - much worse than brick!
Yes, those are cobblestones. Sorry mate, too early!
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Old 12-18-18, 10:42 AM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
But I can't remember slipping on wet pavement when there is nothing loose on it.
I went down on wet pavement once right after a rainstorm and got bad road rash on my elbow. I had just bought a new expensive biking rain jacket, and actually lucked out that somehow the sleeve pushed itself up and I got road rash (which healed on it's own) rather than making the jacket useless by tearing up the sleeve.

New bike, stock tires with the bike, slightly aggressive riding (though not overly so). After that I threw out the tires and put on gp4000's, and it was very obvious in riding that they had a lot more grip on wet pavement.
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Old 12-18-18, 10:44 AM
  #71  
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@paulrivers, which tire slipped?
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Old 12-18-18, 12:23 PM
  #72  
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Originally Posted by JohnBerry View Post
I have used Marathons and then Marathon Pluses for a fairly long time ...
...
... I'm getting old enough (77) now that uphill is uphill with any kind of tire or bike ... But I LOVE my Schwalbe Marathon pluses: sorry it's taken so many words to tell you that!
I’m about halfway at 37, and uphill is always uphill! I appreciate the shared experience, thanks. No apology needed, I’m a “little” long-winded myself LOL


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Old 12-18-18, 12:30 PM
  #73  
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Originally Posted by SalsaShark View Post
The Marathon Touring tires (Greenguard) are an excellent commuter. I have used these for the last few years and gotten excellent treadwear as well as great puncture protection. The last set on my main commuter gave me about 5,000 miles on the rear tire, and 8000 on the front tire. In that time, I believe I had one flat on the rear from a nail. Rolling resistance on these tires is minimal, and they are a smooth riding tire as well. The touring version of the Marathon Tire is available in many sizes as well. I also run the Marathon Winter plus tires in the winter, and when I switch back to the touring tires in the spring, it feels nimble like a race bike!
I’ve only been commuting for just over a year but I expect to continue doing so at about 4-6k miles/yr. I only really started tracking my mileage in August of this year but I think I did about 3-4K miles in the last 12 months, didn’t ride much Feb-July.

I think I’d like to put new tires on about once a year. Sounds like Marathons of most flavors could make it close to that, especially fitting the winter tires from say December through March-ish.

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Old 12-18-18, 05:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Phamilton View Post


I’m about halfway at 37, and uphill is always uphill! I appreciate the shared experience, thanks. No apology needed, I’m a “little” long-winded myself LOL


Thanks for being tolerant, Phamilton
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Old 01-11-19, 06:01 PM
  #75  
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Got my first chance to try the MWP on ice/snow/slush. We got a little freezing rain Wed pm followed by maybe 1/2-3/4” of snow. NWS was not predicting precip so Thurs am was a surprise. Our residential street is one of the last to receive attention from the plow/salt trucks so although the rest of the roads I ride are now clear, our neighborhood still has some ice patches. Anyway, I was a little nervous about it so I did a slow lap around the neighborhood before I decided to give it the green light. It really was weird. The street was so slick I had to walk carefully but on the bike it was as though nothing were different. If I stood on the pedals the rear would slip a little but I wasn’t able to get the front or rear to slip under hard braking. I didn’t feel like testing the front while cornering so I just took it easy. I usually take it easy anyway. I ran them at full pressure, figured I could stop and air down if needed but never felt the need. They did really nice through slush, too, and the 1/2 to 3/4” of snow was like nothing. They were expensive but I’m glad I bought em. They’re still really heavy and I enjoy them much less with a 20mph headwind - 3 such days this week - so I’ve gone back on my decision to just leave them on. For occasional and short-distance commuters I could see the logic but for me 25 miles a day 5 days a week is too much for that heavy/slow of a tire. If the roads are ok, the street tires are going back on. For me, that was the point of having a spare wheel set, so in the winter I could keep the studded tires on the spare wheels, and in the other 3 seasons keep knobbies on them for off-road stuff. I really want to try to enjoy all the capabilities of this bike. The spare wheels also have a 14-34 7s FW as opposed to the 11-28 7s cassette on the “main” wheels. It takes less than 2 minutes to flip the bike over, swap the wheels, and flip it back upright ready to roll. The spare wheels are just a cheap used set I bought off Facebook for $40 w/ tires,
they were off of some low end hybrid. It made a lot of sense to get them as they’ll fit my wife’s bike too.
As far as other versions of the Marathon, I’m not so sure I want the extra weight and rolling resistance for a tire I’ll be using every day 3 seasons out of the year. I’m already carrying a spare tube and mini pump
100% of the time. I think I’d rather have a lighter, faster tire with less puncture protection. I’ve heard Gatorskins have a pretty good reputation as a commuter tire.

Correction: this was Tuesday night going into Wednesday morning. Rough week.

Last edited by Phamilton; 01-11-19 at 06:07 PM.
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