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700 x 45 for commuting on pavement only ?

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700 x 45 for commuting on pavement only ?

Old 06-28-20, 07:44 PM
  #26  
greatscott
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Originally Posted by jeffwhitfield View Post
While you don’t need a 45c tire for pavement, some people prefer wider tires. Saying that it’s far too wide of a tire is a matter of opinion. I personally ride on Rene Herse 38’s for my main road tires. But I also have a 650B wheelset with 47mm WTB Horizons on them. I love riding on those Horizons for casual riding. Super comfy and plenty fast. Really don’t lose any rolling resistance with them being that wide.

Going wider gives you more traction, more free suspension, and a smoother ride. How wide is “too wide” is anyone’s guess. With the right tire, it really doesn’t matter how wide it is. You’ll still be able to maintain a high rate of speed regardless. What really matters is what the goals are for the rider. If they’re after a more comfortable ride then I tell them to go as wide as you can with lower pressure in a tubeless setup. Otherwise, find a middle ground that is a bit wider than normal.

Plus, what’s the goal of the “commuter bike”? What’s the purpose? Speed? Comfort? Traction? Maneuverability? You can have all those things in a tire that’s a bit wider than you think. I used to run 32c tires on my road wheelset. They worked and was pretty happy with them. But after switching to a 38c, I don’t think I’ll ever go back to a 32c. 35c is probably the smallest I would go now.
But with using a wider tire comes more rotational weight and more rolling resistance. I don't know about you, but I don't mind losing a small amount of comfort for ease of pedaling a loaded bike up grades mile after mile, or on flat ground for 50 or 60 miles. This is why on my touring bike I will be using (when they come back in stock again) Schwalbe Marathon Almotion tires, because they only weigh 500 grams for a 700x38c, they have the least rolling resistance of any touring tire, and they will last a long time with high degree of puncture resistance. I've toured on tires that weighed 900 grams and you can feel the weight dragging you down the more miles you ride, and my new bike came with tires that weigh 1600 grams the effect is even worse. I'm more tired at the end of 50 miles on the 1600 gram 45c tires than I was on the 38c 900 gram tires even though the 45c tires do feel more comfortable, but it's the muscles that don't like the extra weight, I don't need the extra cushioning.

More Traction? I didn't notice any better traction when I toured on 32c tires as I do with 45c tires, I'm not racing my touring bike in off road races where that width of a tire might be useful. The same with maneuverability. Speed, your on a loaded touring bike, speed is not really an issue, but if the bike has lighter tires and less rolling resistance than you'll gain a little bit of speed at the same time you'll be less tired.

Like I said before, you can commute on any bike, I commuted for years on bikes with just 23c tires and never thought anything about it, in fact my current commuter uses 25c tires and I have no comfort issues and I'm an "old" man at 67.

Just my opinion of course.

Last edited by greatscott; 06-28-20 at 09:20 PM.
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Old 07-02-20, 01:09 AM
  #27  
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Well, it’s a little more complex than that.

Consider the bike Ted King rode to complete his recent 310 mile 1-day romp across Vermont (https://cyclingtips.com/2020/06/ted-...-entire-state/). He did that on a set of Rene Herse Switchback Hill 650×48 mm tubeless tires. I have a set of WTB Horizon’s, which are a 650bx47 mm tire. Both of these are around the same diameter as a 700cx32 mm tire. That’s the main thing that impacts tire choice the most: diameter.

The idea that wider means more rolling resistance is a bit of a myth. Well, at least with tubeless it is which are designed to be more supple than most clinchers. Most of your wider tubeless tires have tan sidewalls which help give them more suppleness. The suppleness of wider tires is the key to reduced rolling resistance. The reason is that skinnier tires have to be stiffer to handle the higher pressures. With lower pressure tires, the tire can be more supple and, as a result, can handle impacts on the road better. They essentially “spring back” quick with changes in road conditions. Upside of this is that you can run a tire with more surface area hitting the road and not lose any additional rolling resistance.

Now, are there limits? Absolutely. If you’re goal is higher speeds then a really wide tire might not be best. I ride a 700cx38 mm Rene Herse tire as a road tire and cornering at higher speeds can feel a little weird. The reason is that higher volume, wider tires tend to shift a bit when going at higher speeds in corners. So, basically, you have to narrow down how wide you want to go before cornering starts to crater. I find that 32c is a pretty fair trade off. Even 35c tires can work for some.

As for weight, that too is better than you think. Those same 650bx48 mm tires by Rene Herse are around 441g. My 700cx38 mm Rene Herse tires are 385g. The WTB Horizons are a little on the heavier side at 515g. That’s pretty much on par with the 38c tires you mentioned...and with a wider tire no less.

For commuting, I don’t think skinnier tires give you any real advantage. Unless you’re going for sheer speed, it’s better to go with a wider tire for more surface area, better rolling resistance, traction, and added suspension. The only conditions where narrower slicks have an advantage is on smooth pavement which, depending on the city, isn’t always the case. I live in Dallas and road conditions are a mixed bag. As such, riding on a 700cx38 gives me a good advantage. I’ve even ridden on my WTB Horizons on group rides and it was fine. Didn’t notice any reduction in rolling resistance at all.

To your point, I agree...you can commute on anything. Hell, I ride gravel and I always say any bike can be a gravel bike with the right tires. In the end, just go with whatever you feel comfortable with.
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Old 07-07-20, 08:56 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by basketbro View Post
okay, basketbro is a jackass and I love it
First off I didn't say that, you changed everything I said...oh, gee, look what you said! LMAO dumb****.
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Old 07-07-20, 09:17 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by jeffwhitfield View Post
While you don’t need a 45c tire for pavement, some people prefer wider tires. Saying that it’s far too wide of a tire is a matter of opinion. I personally ride on Rene Herse 38’s for my main road tires. But I also have a 650B wheelset with 47mm WTB Horizons on them. I love riding on those Horizons for casual riding. Super comfy and plenty fast. Really don’t lose any rolling resistance with them being that wide.

Going wider gives you more traction, more free suspension, and a smoother ride. How wide is “too wide” is anyone’s guess. With the right tire, it really doesn’t matter how wide it is. You’ll still be able to maintain a high rate of speed regardless. What really matters is what the goals are for the rider. If they’re after a more comfortable ride then I tell them to go as wide as you can with lower pressure in a tubeless setup. Otherwise, find a middle ground that is a bit wider than normal.

Plus, what’s the goal of the “commuter bike”? What’s the purpose? Speed? Comfort? Traction? Maneuverability? You can have all those things in a tire that’s a bit wider than you think. I used to run 32c tires on my road wheelset. They worked and was pretty happy with them. But after switching to a 38c, I don’t think I’ll ever go back to a 32c. 35c is probably the smallest I would go now.
So then why are you not floating down the road on fat tire bike that only needs 15 psi if wide tires are more comfortable and have the same rolling resistance? Which you know that a 25 to 28c tire has the least amount of rolling resistance, as the tire goes fatter from that point the rolling resistance increases along with the weight of the tire as well as the aero dynamics decreases, you should know that being a cyclist and all.

https://ridefar.info/bike/cycling-sp...ir%20pressure.

Yes, wider tires are more comfortable, but you won't feel much of a difference between 38 and 45, but it will take a bit less energy to pedal, unless you're looking for a workout then go with the 45's, in fact for a really good work out you could use the Kenda Drumlins, which weigh 1,600 gram a piece, those will surly give a person a nice workout while commuting or touring...except for touring it may wear you out faster especially after adding another 40 pounds or so of gear to your bike.

Like I said before I tour, and almost everyone I've ever met, or read about on the internet use tires that run between 32 to 38, a few go narrower and few go wider, but the vast majority ride with those size ranges, and they seem to be plenty comfortable.

BUT, you are right, it is your decision, and all I was doing was giving an opinion, and that's why these forums are here for, I gave an opinion, and you gave an opinion, as did others, now it's up to the poster to decide.
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Old 07-07-20, 10:01 PM
  #30  
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It largely depends on the kind of bike you’re riding, what kind of terrain you’re riding on, and your goals. And, like I said, there are limits to how wide you can go before you start to see drops in performance, Same applies to going more narrow though.

To your point, yes, there is a difference between a 38 and a 45. But the loss in energy depends largely on the tire. I’ve noticed that I don’t really lose all that much energy on my 650bx47mm compared to my 700cx38mm wheelset. Why? Tire choice I think. The WTB Horizon’s I ride on don’t have heavy tread on them and thinner sidewalls, making them more supple and thus don’t lose the same amount of energy compared to a similar 47c tire with more tread.

Now, what about a 700cx47mm or higher? Would you lose more energy with a tire that big? Probably. But it’s not necessarily because the tire is wider. The real culprit has more to do with the added circumference of the tire. HUGE difference between a 38 and a 47 on a 700c rim. I honestly wouldn’t go above a 38. Any bigger and you have to work your ass off on steep climbs in lower gears.

But, again, depends on your goals. For a commuter, I would likely stick with something close to a 38 like I ride now. Really like the Rene Herse tires. Just comfy, grippy, with low rolling resistance. Noice! I like the added “free suspension” they give me compared to the 32’s I was running before. And they’re plenty fast too.
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Old 07-13-20, 08:38 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by basketbro View Post
greatscott keep acting like a boomer, i'll keep calling you out.
No you won't.
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Old 07-13-20, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by BillyD View Post
No you won't.
lol watch me.
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Old 07-13-20, 06:05 PM
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I put my money on the guy with the Ban Hammer

wrt the OP though... I have Schwalbe Hurricane on my Surly Crosscheck. 45 in the front, 50 in the back. Wire-bead, and not specifically designated TR, but my rims are TR anyways, and I don't have the energy to go split-tube ghetto. I'm thinking about buying new removable-valve presta tubes just so it's easy to put tubeless sealant in.
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