Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

dyno vs battery lights

Notices
Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

dyno vs battery lights

Old 02-19-10, 10:53 PM
  #1  
chico1st
30mi/day commuter
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 797
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
dyno vs battery lights

hi im wondering if anyone uses dyno lights and what their advantages are. From afar the only thing i notice is that i dont need batteries... is that it? Is that a big deal?

Do you need to buy special lights?
chico1st is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 12:05 AM
  #2  
rrohret
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Iowa
Posts: 44

Bikes: Surly Steamroller

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I prefer battery power. It has been more reliable. The light remains on when stopped with batteries. Previous dyno units I have tried had issues with wet weather ( more than batteries).
rrohret is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 12:10 AM
  #3  
vantassell
Banned.
 
vantassell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: SLC, UT
Posts: 832
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Good question, i'm doing a new commuter build and ended up not going with a dynamo hub. I just feel like a simple AA fueled blinkie (or two) lasts pretty long and works well with lotsa reflective tape and a dynamo might be more trouble then it's worth.

Hopefully people with more knowledge and experience post though, because i'm not too much help.
vantassell is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 12:35 AM
  #4  
IanHelgesen
Riding the road to PARADISE...RIP
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 171
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You do need special lights. Dynamos put out AC power, which will need to be converted to DC if you are using LEDs. Incandescent and halogen lights don't need this, but they're on their way out. Good dynamo lights also have a capacitor (called a "standlight") which will keep the lights for a few minutes while you are stopped. Some will also have a light sensor that will turn them on automatically when it gets dark.

As for advantages, you've got it. Dynamo lights never need to be recharged. This isn't a big deal for "be seen" lights, since you will get months out of a battery with modern LEDs. However, a light bright enough to see by (like modern dynamo lights) will have a much shorter battery life, and so will generally need to be charged every night. Whether this is enough of a hassle to spend the extra money on a dynamo system is up to you.

Also, there are two kinds of dynamos. Bottle dynamos bolt on to the frame and are run by rubbing against the tire. These are cheap and can be completely disconnected when not using the lights, but will have noticeable drag when on and are prone to slipping in wet weather. Dynohubs use magnets built into the hub of the front wheel. These are more expensive, but they do not slip and are extremely efficient since they incur no mechanical losses. There will always be some drag with a hub dynamo, even with the lights off, but it is slight enough to be imperceptible to most people.

(Personally, I'm currently using battery lights, except for the vintage dynohub on my Raleigh Superbe. However, I am planning to move my bikes over to dynamos eventually.)
IanHelgesen is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 12:51 AM
  #5  
CliftonGK1
Senior Member
 
CliftonGK1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 11,375

Bikes: '08 Surly Cross-Check, 2011 Redline Conquest Pro, 2012 Spesh FSR Comp EVO, 2015 Trek Domane 6.2 disc

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Battery advantages:
- Constant light, even when not moving.
- More mount options (helmet, for instance)
- Dollar for dollar, usually brighter than a dyno light.

Battery disadvantages:
- Heavy
- Needs recharged
- Can run out of juice; faster in cold weather

Dyno advantages:
- It won't run out of juice until you do
- LED lights are lightweight and very bright

Dyno disadvantages:
- Expensive to get started with; a dynohub can cost more than an inexpensive, good battery light
- Wiring can be tricky (but it's not really difficult)
- Limited power output (but new lights are bright enough you don't need more than one for most situations)


You can get into a very nice dyno-light setup with a 3N72 wheel for around $190.00, and an IQ Cyo lamp for $125 plus a wired taillight for $30. Considering this is a system which never needs recharged and won't run out of power, plus has a standlight so you don't "disappear" at stop lights, the ~$350 intro price isn't much different than what you would pay for a 600L battery powered system with about 5 hours of runtime.

Things to weigh when deciding on a battery vs. dyno system are how often and how long you ride at night. Do you want the extra weight (and very very minor drag) of a dynohub and light on your bike all the time? Do you lock up in crummy areas where these things will be a target? Remember; you don't just take a dyno light off when you lock up; it's bolted in place.
Do you spend more than 3 or 4 hours in the dark at a time? You might want a dyno setup.

Modern dynos and lights do not suffer problems when it's wet out. Bottle generators (sidewall-type) had issues with the contact wheel slipping. This can't happen with a dynohub. I've ridden in over 10 hours of constant rain with my SON28/Edelux/Seculite combo with no problems. Whether it's a Shimano 3Nxx series or a Schmidt dynohub, the reliability and ease of use is there. Shimano uses a quick release wire plug at the hub, and Schmidt (SON) uses twin spade connectors at the hub.
__________________
"I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
- Mandi M.
CliftonGK1 is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 01:38 AM
  #6  
busted knuckles
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: wa
Posts: 416
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have been using a fenix light with rechargeable batteries. Got tired of maintaining the batteries, on a few occasions I had to commute in the dark due to forgetting to charge batteries. The light was fine, bright enough. I decided to purchase a son dynohub and light. Should be here next week or so. It was pricey, but I dont drive so my bike is my only transportation, I think it will be worth it. Yes, keeping the batteries charged would have been cheaper but it is one less thing for me to have to do. The led dyno light should be lots brighter.
busted knuckles is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 07:36 AM
  #7  
MichaelW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Posts: 12,948
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Modern dynohubs from SON, Shimano or SRAM are reliable and efficient in all weathers. They all output 3watts of power. With modern LED lamps that can result in a very bright light, easily enough to light up a dark lane. Its not enough for high speed, off-road downhill riding but on the road its plenty. Ive done descents on isolated rural roads with no other source of lighting.
Dynohubs are heavier than normal so they are not so suited to riders who like to accelerate like a sprinter but if you a utility rider who likes to roll along at a steady pace they are ideal. Dynohubs have long been the favourite for endurance Audax/Sportiff riders who ride all night at quite a fast pace.

Dynohubs are better than sidewall/bottle dynamos for everyday use. I have a sidewall model on my tourer but only use the light occasionally. The key for bottle dynamos is effective mounting, I have mine bolted to a braze-on tab. The seatstay clamp style of mount is major source of problems.

A good dynohub setup is not cheap but is fit and forget. For some reason, no-one tampers with them or tries to steal them.
MichaelW is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 07:43 AM
  #8  
daven1986
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 2,324
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I use a Shimano alfine dyno hub with a B&M cyo on the front and a B&M seculite on the back. I also have a fenix L2D torch on my helmet and a dinotte 140-R-AA as an extra taillight. Also have a blinky on the front and space for another blinky on the back.

Redundancy is why I use all that. Also the helmet light is good for directional lighting, the cyo is good for lighting the road and the dinotte is just badass! Even with all that the road is barely lit up due to car headlights "polluting" my light.

I got the dynohub when I wanted to go for a night ride, but none of my batteries were charged. It is there so I don't have to worry if I forget to charge my batteries / can't charge them. Fairly high setup cost - but not moreso than a decent lighting system anyway.
daven1986 is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 09:55 AM
  #9  
peliot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 50
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I found a great solution that seems to be the best of both worlds. Try reelights (www.reelights.com). They are LED blinkies that are powered off magnets mounted on the spokes (no batteries). A pair is about $50, more than a normal set of blinkies but far less than a dynamo hub. They are as bright as a normal rear blinkie, run for at least few minutes after you stop (5-10 minutes when fully charged in my experience, more than enough for stoplights and so forth).The front white light is not bright enough to see where you are going on a dark path, but bright enough for cars to see you.
You don't have to worry about batteries, but you also don't have to pay the high cost of a dynamo hub. If you want a headlight bright enough to see with, you would need a dynamo, but for "be seen" lights, particularly a rear blinkie, the reelights are perfect.
peliot is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 11:14 AM
  #10  
vantassell
Banned.
 
vantassell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: SLC, UT
Posts: 832
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Just so you know, it's www.reelight.com

I remember seeing these about two years ago and have been trying to find the website again, thanks for posting it peliot.

Anyone know anything their 'new lights' that are going to be available on the webstore very soon?
vantassell is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 11:52 AM
  #11  
Pedaleur
Je pose, donc je suis.
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Back. Here.
Posts: 2,898
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by MichaelW View Post
Modern dynohubs from SON, Shimano or SRAM are reliable and efficient in all weathers. They all output 3watts of power.
They are all rated for 3W, but you can actually get a lot more out of them by wiring LEDs in series.

Another plus for dynohubs is that if you're capable, they provide lots of opportunity for tinkering. You can make a light with an integrated battery (or large capacitor) for standing lights. I'm in the process of incorporating a charging circuit for an extra battery for a helmet lamp. You can even rig them up to power electronics (with care).

All of this, however, is more costly than just buying a rechargeable battery, but it's fun.
Pedaleur is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 11:56 AM
  #12  
Pedaleur
Je pose, donc je suis.
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Back. Here.
Posts: 2,898
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by peliot View Post
I found a great solution that seems to be the best of both worlds. Try reelights (www.reelights.com). They are LED blinkies that are powered off magnets mounted on the spokes (no batteries). A pair is about $50, more than a normal set of blinkies but far less than a dynamo hub. They are as bright as a normal rear blinkie, run for at least few minutes after you stop (5-10 minutes when fully charged in my experience, more than enough for stoplights and so forth).The front white light is not bright enough to see where you are going on a dark path, but bright enough for cars to see you.
You don't have to worry about batteries, but you also don't have to pay the high cost of a dynamo hub. If you want a headlight bright enough to see with, you would need a dynamo, but for "be seen" lights, particularly a rear blinkie, the reelights are perfect.
I find these very minimal. I almost always ride with a battery powered head light to supplement; not just to see, but to be seen as well.
Pedaleur is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 12:26 PM
  #13  
no1mad 
Thunder Whisperer
 
no1mad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: NE OK
Posts: 8,852

Bikes: '06 Kona Smoke

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 274 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 1 Post
There is another dyno light option, not as popular and thus not as well known. The bottom bracket (or roller). According to this, it's similar to a bottle generator, but doesn't wear down the tire. Looks like yellowjersey has one with halogen for 60 bucks. Please note that I have no experience with either BB dynos or yellowjersey, just pointing out that there was/is a third option for dyno lights.
__________________
Community guidelines
no1mad is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 12:44 PM
  #14  
narr33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 100
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I have been using a hub dynomo with lumotec headlight and taillight for several years on my commuter. Return trip is at night so I use it 5 day a week. I still use battery lights as backup but after a couple years charging the batteries has become more of a chore. Batteries last about 6-8 months before they no longer hold a charge and are about $50 to replace. Over the years the dyno hub was definetly worth it in terms of overall cost and provides hassle free light. Batteries also have to be disposed of, so dyno hubs are more earth friendly.
narr33 is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 12:46 PM
  #15  
chico1st
30mi/day commuter
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 797
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
i think i have actaully decided to not go with one of these... i had no idea the lights themselves were so expensive I have seen them all for 80$+

I leave my bike in sketchy places and try not to sink too much money into it... so that WHEN its stolen i wont be crushed
chico1st is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 12:46 PM
  #16  
HardyWeinberg
GATC
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: south Puget Sound
Posts: 8,728
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 463 Post(s)
Liked 47 Times in 26 Posts
Even though batteries get better and better and last longer and longer as lights also get more efficient, it's such a relief to know w/ a dyno that I will make it home w/ the light working no matter what. In northern latitudes that's less of an issue in summer but much more of one ... outside of summer.
HardyWeinberg is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 12:59 PM
  #17  
Arcanum
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 903

Bikes: 2010 Kona Dr. Dew, Moose Bicycle XXL (fat bike), Yuba Mundo V3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by chico1st View Post
i think i have actaully decided to not go with one of these... i had no idea the lights themselves were so expensive I have seen them all for 80$+

I leave my bike in sketchy places and try not to sink too much money into it... so that WHEN its stolen i wont be crushed
You can get them for less than that.
https://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...s.php?id=26606

I've seen dynamo lights for even less ($30-$40ish). There are probably also some that are easily detachable to carry with you like normal battery powered lights.

Edit: $40 https://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...&category=3679
Arcanum is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 04:58 PM
  #18  
znomit
Zoom zoom zoom zoom bonk
 
znomit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 4,244

Bikes: Giant Defy, Trek 1.7c, BMC GF02, Fuji Tahoe, Scott Sub 35

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 383 Post(s)
Liked 413 Times in 204 Posts
Originally Posted by vantassell View Post
Just so you know, it's www.reelight.com

I remember seeing these about two years ago and have been trying to find the website again, thanks for posting it peliot.

Anyone know anything their 'new lights' that are going to be available on the webstore very soon?
I think the generator thingee is remote from the lighthead. Looks kinda ugly. I use SL150s on my commuter but usually run battery lights as well.

Regarding dynos. Just get on and go, night after night, year after year.
znomit is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 05:41 PM
  #19  
interested
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: KÝbenhavn
Posts: 465

Bikes: Kinesisbikes UK Racelight Tk

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by chico1st View Post
hi im wondering if anyone uses dyno lights and what their advantages are. From afar the only thing i notice is that i dont need batteries... is that it? Is that a big deal?

Do you need to buy special lights?
The convenience of a hub dynamo and a LED dynamo light is great; you never have to worry about batteries or whether you need a light or not later that day since you always have a light source handy. Just jump on the bike an go.

My dynamo hubs and lights have also been the most reliable light systems I have ever owned, they just works day in and day out for years without trouble. I think some of its reliability is because the light source is bolted to the bike, and that it is very light since it doesn't contain heavy batteries and therefore doesn't rattle itself to death like some battery powered lights I have owned. Since the light is permanently attached, you don't drop it on the concrete floor either; putting on and taking off lights twice a day means that most people will drop them one time or another.
I also like that when visibility drops in the daytime because of rain or snow, I just turn on the light.

Not having to depend on batteries is a big deal for me, I simply got tired of researching batteries and battery technology; Nimh, Li-ion, Li-Po, NiCd, LSD, protected or unprotected, is this battery pack charged in parallel or serial, which battery has memory effect, should you top off this battery type every day, or does it harm it, delta trickle charging is a must have feature except for these new Zinc batteries, does this battery explode when overcharged, etc etc.

Many rechargeable batteries have unpredictable shorter run times when it is very cold, but also have so high a self discharge that spare batteries becomes a logistic burden.
Many new high power batteries can be quite dangerous if damaged or if they short circuit, eg. one guy who had bought a Magicshine light, had to throw it out the train window when it suddenly caught fire for no apparent reason. So you really have to babysit them, taking care that they don't get damaged, and use quality chargers etc.

For my usage pattern, batteries are too much trouble. Just the fact that I don't have to carry bulging lights in my pockets when stopping for an errand makes me prefer dynamo lights.

--
Regards
interested is offline  
Old 02-20-10, 06:50 PM
  #20  
akohekohe
The Professor
 
akohekohe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Center Sandwich, New Hampshire
Posts: 899

Bikes: Alex Moulton Double Pylon, Surly Big Dummy, Alex Moulton GT, AZUB TiFly

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
I've used both over the years. I was never really satisfied with the old dynamos because I really didn't think they were bright enough and the old dyno hubs were heavy. I now have a new generation SON and the thing only weighs 270 grams more than a regular front hub ... and I've combined it with an Supernova E3 triple that puts out 650 lumens. I leave it on all the time for visibility, sort like motorcycles do with their headlights. I rode it the other day when there were flash flood warnings and one inch an hour rain (fun, fun, fun ... people at work were all saying: you didn't ride today did you?) and while my Garmin 705 took some water (it recovered after I dried it out) the light worked flawlessly. The other advantage of the dynamo is if I forget to charge the mobile phone, the GPS, or my camera batteries I can charge them off the dynamo (with an inverter), particularly useful when on tour. Of course the whole thing cost more than many complete bikes, but what I save by not having a car allows me to splurge on the bike.
akohekohe is offline  
Old 02-21-10, 01:27 AM
  #21  
chico1st
30mi/day commuter
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 797
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hmmm, im being sold... do you recommend a certain hub or light? I'm trying to keep cost down.. i can get a nice Sturmy front dyno/drum for a good price... are those decent?
chico1st is offline  
Old 02-21-10, 04:34 AM
  #22  
IanHelgesen
Riding the road to PARADISE...RIP
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 171
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by chico1st View Post
Hmmm, im being sold... do you recommend a certain hub or light? I'm trying to keep cost down.. i can get a nice Sturmy front dyno/drum for a good price... are those decent?
The cheapest option (if you know what you're doing) is to build your own. I just picked up parts to retrofit the old chrome bullet headlight on my Superbe with a high-powered LED and standlight for about $30. I'm not certain whether I really know what I'm doing, but one of the members at our coop is holding workshops to help people with DIY lighting projects.

For off-the-shelf lights, the B&M IQ Cyo seems to be about the best value out there. You could save a few more bucks by looking for the older (and dimmer) IQ Fly, but the price difference didn't seem to be large last time I looked. They aren't exactly cheap (~90 dollars), but neither is anything else in this class (there are some cheaper dynamo lights, but most won't be bright enough to see by, and many use Halogen bulbs instead of LEDs). If you do go for this light, you should be aware that there are a large number of versions. The light comes in either a Sport (bright main beam) or Nearfield/Reflector version (dimmer main beam but more illumination of the area just in front of you). Both of these have further options: the Plus includes a standlight and the Senso will turn on automatically in the dark. I believe it also comes in switched (for dynohub) and non-switched (for bottle dynamo) versions.

I haven't found a ton of information on the Sturmey hub (I actually have one, but still need to build it into a wheel). However, the electronics are made by Sanyo, who also make them for the Shimano dynohubs. The newer Sturmey drum brakes are supposed to be quite effective, and the hub seems to be of good quality.
IanHelgesen is offline  
Old 02-21-10, 07:59 AM
  #23  
chico1st
30mi/day commuter
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 797
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I assume the of the shelf products would be a bit more rugged than anything I make... I am an electrical engineer though (not really but close enough)
Does anyone have an opinion on DIY projects vs. premade?
Or more recommendations?

What is wrong with halogen lights, they are cheap and provide lots of light, no?
chico1st is offline  
Old 02-21-10, 08:06 AM
  #24  
gitarzan
Lost Again
 
gitarzan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Columbus, Oh!
Posts: 1,041

Bikes: Soma Saga, 1991 Sirrus, Specialized Secteur Elite, Miele Umbria Elite.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I run the dyno and have a cheap battery light for stops. Also I point the dyno light well ahead and the battery light just in front of the wheel. The pattern looks like an exclamation mark.
gitarzan is offline  
Old 02-21-10, 10:14 AM
  #25  
BarracksSi
Bike ≠ Car ≠ Ped.
 
BarracksSi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 13,861

Bikes: Some bikes. Hell, they're all the same, ain't they?

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by chico1st View Post
What is wrong with halogen lights, they are cheap and provide lots of light, no?
True, but they need more speed to give that much light (and if they're battery-powered, they need lots of battery to have a usable runtime). They can work with a standlight, but they'll drain the capacitor more quickly than an LED does.

LEDs are bright enough now that they can compete with halogen on brightness while retaining the efficiency advantages inherent to LED.

My go-to bike has a dynohub and LED lighting. My next commuter will also have a dynohub and LED lighting. I've got good battery lights for my other bikes (Superflash, Dinotte), but the convenience of generator lighting is just too nice to give up. I can't feel the drag from the wheel, either -- a breeze imparts more drag.

My setup, fyi: Shimano dynohub, B&M DLumotec Senso Plus headlight ("Senso" = automatically turns on in the dark; "Plus" = standlight), B&M Selectra 3-LED taillight with standlight circuit.
BarracksSi is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.