Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

my first time!

Old 04-12-11, 01:09 PM
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c_mack9
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my first time!

today i commuted to work today with my bike. it feels great, i had a good ride here, and the traffic was nice and even at the big intersection i was concerned about, i caught it green and went on through while traffic waited for me. i made the mistake of wearing a cotton tshirt, stupid i know and i need to find another backpack to use. mine is to big and bulky. nyone know of a smaller, lightweight, streamlined backpack i can fit my shoes, clothes, and maybe a few grocery items in? i did some research in the commuting forum over them weekend, yall are TONS of help. what is normal and second nature, is stuff us newbs have never thought about so thanks for sharing your insights and experience to help newcomers commute safely, and effeciently.
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Old 04-12-11, 01:57 PM
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Some of this commuting stuff is learn by doing. I was a fair weather commuter for many years without the luxury of the internet. I have definitely learned a lot since joining this forum and for the past 2-3 years have been a year round commuter.

For quick jaunts around with not a lot of weight a backpack maybe fine. However, if you want to start carrying bulky and/or heavier items then a rack is the way to go. For hauling items like groceries get some panniers and/or basket(s).

Right now I have a milk crate attached to my rack so I can put my backpack in it when I carry it; or I can throw a couple bags of groceries in it when I go shopping.

Anyways its always great to see more and more commuters so keep it up .
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Old 04-12-11, 02:02 PM
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Congrats on your first trip!
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Old 04-12-11, 06:56 PM
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Originally Posted by exile View Post
Some of this commuting stuff is learn by doing. I was a fair weather commuter for many years without the luxury of the internet. I have definitely learned a lot since joining this forum and for the past 2-3 years have been a year round commuter.

For quick jaunts around with not a lot of weight a backpack maybe fine. However, if you want to start carrying bulky and/or heavier items then a rack is the way to go. For hauling items like groceries get some panniers and/or basket(s).

Right now I have a milk crate attached to my rack so I can put my backpack in it when I carry it; or I can throw a couple bags of groceries in it when I go shopping.

Anyways its always great to see more and more commuters so keep it up .
thanks. i will be a fair weather commuter. this is the only bike i have and its main purpose is for fitness and distance so i dont want to add a bunch of bulky crap to it. a backpack is fine, but i would rather have a larger saddle bag that i could put some shoes and my change of clothes in. thats really all i need the backpack for. is there a bad made that is that large?
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Old 04-12-11, 07:10 PM
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A backpack will work but eventually, (particularly come summer), you'll appreciate putting your load on a rack instead of on your back. You're shoulders will also thank you a million times over.

I highly suggest looking into a rack and a set of panniers. To get an idea of the size of panniers which are measured in cubic inches, visit Jansport's website. Their basic backpack is rated at 1900 cubic inches. I have medium-sized panniers which are rated at 1830 cubic inches and I can easily fit a pair of jeans, a shirt, and a pair of shoes in 1 pannier. I got a good deal at my local bike shop (commonly referred to around these parts a an LBS) on a set of Axiom Kootenay panniers. My point is that you don't need a particularly large bag or set of bags to transport a change of clothes.

I wouldn't consider a rack and panniers to be adding "a bunch of bulky crap" to your bike. I've got a rack and panniers on my road bike and I can take the bags off faster than you think and the rack is only 4 allen bolts and I'm done. However, I'll admit I rarely take off the rack and having the bags are nice in case I end up needing the room mid-ride.

Not sure how you feel about spandex roadie gear but as far as cycling clothing goes, a pair of padded cycling shorts and a jersey makes all the difference in warm weather. I started with just swimming trunks and a cotton undershirt and it was miserable.

Keep up the commuting and stay safe. Sorry for the novel too.
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Old 04-12-11, 07:15 PM
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Originally Posted by c_mack9 View Post
thanks. i will be a fair weather commuter. this is the only bike i have and its main purpose is for fitness and distance so i dont want to add a bunch of bulky crap to it. a backpack is fine, but i would rather have a larger saddle bag that i could put some shoes and my change of clothes in. thats really all i need the backpack for. is there a bad made that is that large?
It would be hard to find a seatpost bag that would fit a pair of shoes. Maybe a handlebar bag, or you could use a seatpost rack.
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Old 04-12-11, 07:29 PM
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no need for apologies, i appreciate your time to help me. i wont be adding a rack or panniers. is there a different frame bag that would be big enough? maybe like one of those triangle shaped ones that goes in the 90 frame bend under the seatpost?
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Old 04-15-11, 07:09 AM
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Originally Posted by CbadRider View Post
It would be hard to find a seatpost bag that would fit a pair of shoes. Maybe a handlebar bag, or you could use a seatpost rack.
well i said i wouldnt be using a rack but dicks' has a seatpost rack that has a quick release, are these safe for carbon seatposts or would they crush it?
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