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New bike suggestions?

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New bike suggestions?

Old 07-11-11, 09:48 PM
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Nel
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New bike suggestions?

Hello,
Been doing a short commute (< 7 miles) flat/small rolling hills, near Boston, on a 15-year old Klein mountain bike at the end its lifecycle.
I test drove a single speed but it's not for me. Looking for something faster, but not as fragile as a road bike. $1000 range. No need for a triple-ring or suspension or a comfy seat. Prefer a straight bar, and I like the idea of disc brakes. I wear a backpack so I don't needs racks, etc.
Saw a couple that looked interesting, although they had triple-rings...
Scott Sub 20
Trek Mendota
Any other models I should be looking at?
Thanks!
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Old 07-12-11, 06:42 AM
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Kona Dr Fine
Cannondale Hooligan 3
Jamis Coda Elite
Giant Seek 1
Redline Metro Disc
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Old 07-12-11, 06:56 AM
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Trek has thier FX line. I ride one (7.5) & like it quite a bit.
Specialized Sirrus/Sirrus Pro (not sure on the prices of these)
Marin has a line of flat bar road bikes-the ALP line. The Lucas Valley is around $850. I have a Mill Valley & it's also a great bike.
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Old 07-12-11, 07:49 PM
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GREAT suggestions!

Thanks for those. I will look for them at the bike stores. Don't know too much about the reliability of internal gear hubs...any thoughts?
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Old 07-12-11, 11:17 PM
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DG Going Uphill
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Got the Kona Dr. Fine two weeks ago and am loving it! Sturdy, light, easy to maintain, comfortable, somewhat fast, and an incredible parts and frame pick for the price. Only thing I had to change was the stem (I have really long arms, so I needed a longer one) and the seat (I can't remember the last time I used a stock seat). The dropout configuration is the best I have seen for this type of bike, allowing for standard fenders and racks in back.
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Old 07-13-11, 01:06 AM
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Over 2 years on a Giant Seek1. Love the bike, especially the 8 speed IGH. I do like steel frames though and the Seek1 is aluminum. Only maintenance on the IGH is annual cleaning and a dip in new oil by someone who knows the IGH. Very reliable. With Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires, I never have a second thought about any issues during my commute. If you are looking for comfort and reliability, I recommend the Seek1.
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Old 07-13-11, 08:48 PM
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Another choice

I started to call around to see if anyone carrried the bikes suggested. One shop said a good choice was the Raleigh Cadent I8.
It doesn't have disc brakes but then I thought, well maybe they are heavier and more expensive. I don't stop that much anyway...
http://www.raleighusa.com/bikes/perf.../cadent-i8-11/
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Old 07-14-11, 12:16 AM
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Internal hubs should decrease the frequency of your maintenance over a derailleur system (ie, stuff doesn't break as often), but they are much more complicated when something does go wrong. This includes changing a tire, because you have to wrestle the shift cable off before removing the rear wheel. If you park outdoors during the day (or at night) in all conditions, IGH is probably for you. If you store your bike inside, I would go with derailleurs. If you go IGH, check out the Trek Soho DLX. Disk brakes, Belt Drive, 8sp IGH... pretty much maintenance free until something breaks (no "tuning" or lubing stuff constantly).

If you go derailleurs, I would steer away from the commuting category and look purely at rigid mtb's and sport hybrids. Something like a fully rigid Niner with slicks and set up as a 1x9 drivetrain (or however many rear gears you want) would be my dream commuter for this area. Might be doable in your price range if you shop for your parts right (and do the labor putting it together yourself).

As for the hybrids, every major brand makes them, and there aren't a lot of differences between them. They are probably lighter than a rigid MTB and a little more efficient on road. Some err on the cheaper side, some give you some better "other parts" (saddle, tires, etc) at a little more cost, but they are basically the same. Unless one really catches your eye, buy one of the brands that your favorite shop sells, because the differences in dealing with them over the life of the bike will outweigh the differences between the bikes.

Don't settle on something too quick... sometimes the search is half the fun

EDIT: Disk brakes are nice if you get good ones... but most disk brakes on sub $1000 bikes suck. A nice set of V's with good pads is better than cheap disk brakes by a good margin, and is easier to deal with as well. Look for a mechanical brake by Avid, and don't bother with the cheap stuff. In a pinch I'd try the Shimano Mechs (M515 I think?) or a Hayes model (HFX-1?), but I'd try for Avid.

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Old 07-14-11, 05:22 PM
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The Trek Soho DLX ignknighted recommended looks like awesome commuter. Think I will go to the LBS and check it out.
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Old 07-14-11, 05:24 PM
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Imagine what you could do to that Klein with even half the price you're prepared to spend on a new rig.
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Old 07-14-11, 08:39 PM
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The Klein needs so many things. Cassette, rings, chain, shifters, all cables, brakes, and tires need replacement. Bike shop gave $400 estimate for those. Front shock does not work at all, and quick release on both wheels are corroding. Frame seems OK, but is missing quite a bit of paint. Fixing everything starts approaching the cost of a new bike - the Raleigh Cadent I8 is $700, for example, and is designed for commuting.
I'd rather list it on Craigslist or ebay for someone else to restore. It was great for mountain bike racing, but I don't do that anymore...
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Old 07-14-11, 09:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Nel View Post
The Klein needs so many things. Cassette, rings, chain, shifters, all cables, brakes, and tires need replacement. Bike shop gave $400 estimate for those. Front shock does not work at all, and quick release on both wheels are corroding. Frame seems OK, but is missing quite a bit of paint. Fixing everything starts approaching the cost of a new bike - the Raleigh Cadent I8 is $700, for example, and is designed for commuting.
I'd rather list it on Craigslist or ebay for someone else to restore. It was great for mountain bike racing, but I don't do that anymore...
It's a labor intensive job, yes. That's why the shop is quoting so much to replace very simple stuff. But if you have the slightest bit of mechanical inclination or willingness to learn, you could easily do it yourself and save the labor cost. There are tons of great online tutorials (ie, http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help).

For about $500, you could get:
-new disc front wheel
-new rigid disc-compatible fork (FYI, you need one with a 1" steerer)
-new, great quality mechanical disc brakes, and you could maybe sell the rear(?) since you won't be able to use it with the frame. Doesn't even matter since the front is really all you need for good stopping power.
-new headset, stem, and handlebars (~$70, another $20 for the shop to install the headset since it's a specialty job)
-new cables, housing ~$20
-new top quality commuting tires
-new cassette ~$25 depending
-chainrings ~$50
-chain ~$15
-Add $100 for tools assuming you have entirely none, and you're still under $600.

Some people just want 'new.' But that Klein probably has a great frame, and the geometry is probably perfectly suited for commuting (15 years ago the geometry wasn't as aggressive); and you've ridden the heck out of it so you know you like it. Outfitted as above, you will get a *much* better bike than that mediocre Raleigh, at a lower cost. *Fact* That Raleigh is no more designed for commuting than any other bike is. It is marketed for commuting. This is an important distinction.

Even if it were the same price you'd still get a better bike out of it, and learn all the skills you need to do your own maintenance for the rest of your cycling life. But, again, it is a labor intensive job, and if you don't wish to spend the time on product selection and installation, then of course buying new is a more cost-effective option.

As an aside, you could get the bike totally repainted for another probably $150. That's a total guess, because who in the world cares about a slick paint job on a function-oriented commuting bike

Last edited by powitte; 07-15-11 at 05:50 AM.
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Old 07-15-11, 11:13 AM
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Hmm...I'm listening! It was my original thought to keep the Klein and rebuild. I do like the feel and fit and I think the handlebar/stem and headset are fine...and I'd probably feel better that I had "recycled".
I still want to test ride IGH/disc brakes. That should give me a better idea of my options. Looks like an IGH by itself is $300 though...
I saw another thread here that talked about do-it-yourself painting...with a brush!
http://www.mytenspeeds.com/My_TenSpe..._A_Bicycle.htm
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Old 07-15-11, 02:19 PM
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If you can live with a triple-ring, here are three that I looked at before I finally got one. Giant Seek 2, Trek PDX and Cannondale Quick CX4. I went with the Quick CX4 and have been very happy with it. They are all around 600 dollars. There are not that many hills where I live but I have already had to use the small gear on the front twice now and I`m glad I have it. Just throwing that out there.
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Old 07-16-11, 10:56 AM
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If you get a new fork, it will be the 'threadless' variety. This is good, but it will require a new headset and stem, though you could reuse the handlebars assuming the clamp size is the same on your new and old stems.

Consult the mechanics forum for more/better information.
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Old 07-16-11, 12:59 PM
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Just curious, is a folder like the Brompton a possibility? I don't need to commute (I work at home) but if I did, rather than locking my bike somewhere, I like that in the same time as locking I could fold the bike and simply take it with me. A folded Brompton is something like 21x22x11 and weighs under 30#. However, they're about $200-500 over what your budget is (price depends on gearing and accessories).

http://www.brompton.co.uk/
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Old 07-16-11, 01:36 PM
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Having read the entire thread, here's what I'd suggest:

1. Since the OP doesn't quite feel the need for a triple chainring (which seems to be the standard on most bikes nowadays), the Redline Metro 9 (1x9) might be an option.
2. OP is now on the fence about disc brakes and is open to the idea of restoring current Klein.
3. Get the Redline for the daily driver AND turn the Klein into a project bike.

End result? Two bikes and a skill set/knowledge base to keep both running.
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Old 07-16-11, 08:50 PM
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Tried the IGH today (on a Trek Soho). Not sure if that is an option anymore. It also felt bulky or heavy. Back to a double (or single) ring! Without disc brakes.
Sounds like I should start looking for an aluminum(?) fork. Any suggestions for finding parts? ebay?
Thanks for all your replies so far...I am definitely "on the fence" on most decisions but feel a better sense of direction now.
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Old 08-08-11, 12:45 PM
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Changed my mind again!

I pursued fixing the Klein, but trying to spec out all the parts, find out what fits together, purchasing parts and tools, learning to assemble it, etc. just won't work for me. And I don't have the time (I have 2 kids). I'll put the frame on ebay for someone more ambitious!

I think I'd rather do what "igknighted" said.

So, now I'm to looking for a (relatively) lightweight steel 29er with a rigid fork, with 1x9 gearing, disc brakes. I think that will be the best thing for Boston winters. The Redline D460 was spec'ed like that, but they stopped making it...any other ideas?
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Old 10-30-11, 08:35 PM
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What I ended up doing...

I know you've all been on the edge of your seats for 3 months!

I bought a "used" GT Peace Multi 29er. It only had about 5 miles on it. Then I parted out the Klein on e-bay. I actually learned a lot about bikes by taking it apart...

Love the new bike. It doesn't have top of the line components and it's not a 1x9, but the steel frame and disc brakes are nice. The bike is kind of a tank so I think it will be great in the winter...

http://www.performancebike.com/image...-TAN-ANGLE.jpg

Thanks again for the advice.
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Old 11-01-11, 02:43 PM
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Some guy just posted about how much he likes this bike:
http://www.swobo.com/catalog/product...Path=2448_2449

It would seem to fit the bill. I really like the Specialized Globe models for commuting.

I do think internal hubs make ideal commuters and the Nexus 7 and Nexus 8 have a very nice range. I make due with a 5 but my area is pretty flat.
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