Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Riding w/ SLR Cameras

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Riding w/ SLR Cameras

Old 04-05-14, 09:36 PM
  #1  
CrankyOne
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
CrankyOne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,350
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Riding w/ SLR Cameras

On visits to various cities to collect photos I'll usually rent a bike and ride around to shoot. Most times the bikes (city, upright) have a front basket but occasionally not. All of my current bags are backpack style which I don't like to use if I'm doing a lot of shooting, nor is putting it on the rear rack a good solution. Both of these take too long to grab a camera.

When I've not had a basket in the past I've just kept one or two camera's on me using Black Rapid straps (very much my favorite system). Riding around with these hanging at my side isn't great, though it does allow me to grab shots quickly (sometimes with many apologies to the person behind me). Each camera and lens is about 5 to 8 lbs.

Any ideas for better options?
CrankyOne is offline  
Old 04-05-14, 10:42 PM
  #2  
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Posts: 7,262
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 657 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Get a handlebar bag with a quick attachment system that would let you use it with the types of bike you usually rent?
prathmann is offline  
Old 04-05-14, 11:01 PM
  #3  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,434

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6710 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 128 Times in 109 Posts
Of note: Ortlieb offers a drop in DSLR padded insert for Their HB bags.

and they make a dry bag and harness to keep the camera at chest height as well ..

Last edited by fietsbob; 04-05-14 at 11:05 PM.
fietsbob is online now  
Old 04-06-14, 07:18 AM
  #4  
chriskmurray
Senior Member
 
chriskmurray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Colorado Springs
Posts: 1,134

Bikes: Borealis Echo, Ground Up Designs Ti Cross bike, Xtracycle, GT mod trials bike, pixie race machine

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have a co worker who regularly rides with an SLR camera and he modified a small camera case (small meaning just fits the camera/lens) that he has strapped to the shoulder straps of his back pack. He can have the camera out in seconds and has used it on some pretty technical trails with no issues, he does complain that it bounces a lot but on pavement that should not be a problem.
chriskmurray is offline  
Old 04-06-14, 07:45 AM
  #5  
NOS88
Senior Member
 
NOS88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Montgomery County, Pennsylvania
Posts: 6,489
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've struggled with similar issues, and not found a perfect solution. Given you don't know what might be available in terms of a ride, I've decided to use a sling pack instead of a backpack. It keeps the camera secure, and allows me "quicker" access, because I can swing the pact around to the front and the camera opening is along the side of the pack, which now is facing straight up. While not perfect, it is quicker than a full backback and provide a level of protection I can accept. I'll be following this thread to see if others have different solutions. Thanks for starting this one.
__________________
A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. - S. Wright
Favorite rides in the stable: Indy Fab CJ Ti - Colnago MXL - S-Works Roubaix - Habanero Team Issue - Jamis Eclipse carbon/831
NOS88 is offline  
Old 04-06-14, 08:56 AM
  #6  
Paramount1973 
Senior Member
 
Paramount1973's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: The First State.
Posts: 1,153

Bikes: Schwinn Continental, Schwinn Paramount, Schwinn High Plains, Schwinn World Sport, Trek 420, Trek 930,Trek 660, Novara X-R, Giant Iguana. Fuji Sagres mixte.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That is a DSLR shoulder bag repurposed as a front bag. It is mounted via a front rack and a VO decaleur. In DSLR mode, I can get a camera with lens and one or two additional lenses in it. I am very happy with the setup.


P4170268 by galoot_loves_tools, on Flickr
Paramount1973 is offline  
Old 04-06-14, 12:08 PM
  #7  
jputnam
Senior Member
 
jputnam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Pacific, WA
Posts: 1,260

Bikes: Custom 531ST touring, Bilenky Viewpoint, Bianchi Milano, vintage Condor racer

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
For mid-size cameras (full 35mm SLR, DSLR) a handlebar bag has always worked well for me. Ortlieb or equivalent for water protection.

For larger cameras, an Oyster Bucket pannier with cubed foam hanging off my front rack gave quick access to a Mamiya Universal with 70mm roll film back for landscapes.
jputnam is offline  
Old 04-08-14, 06:28 PM
  #8  
WDH74
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 92

Bikes: Diamondback Wildwood Classic, Trek FX 7.3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've generally used a messenger bag on the bike, because I can swing it around and fish the camera out pretty quickly. Bear in mind I usually use a messenger bag for walking-around shooting too, so I have lots of practice. I don't know if I can do it while moving, because I won't try it.
WDH74 is offline  
Old 04-09-14, 12:47 AM
  #9  
Ozonation
Senior Member
 
Ozonation's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,064

Bikes: Rivendell Sam Hillborne DTT in Awesome Green; Brompton M6R (reduced gearing) in Sage Green; GT Timberline Hybrid (10 years old!)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Consider the "Cotton Carrier". Here's a cheesy promotional video: Cotton Carrier Camera Systems Action Video - YouTube

I have it, and yes, I have used it while biking. I was going to photograph a bike race and I thought it would be rather stupid to drive there - plus parking would be nonexistent. To be honest, I find the Cotton Carrier less than ideal if you're using the camera under "normal" circumstances; like you, I have Black Rapid straps. However, I was concerned about bumps and rattles while on the bike if I put my cameras into my basket or in panniers or strapped to the back rack. I figured if it was strapped to me, my body would provide the best shock absorption. I wasn't too keen on putting all my gear in a backpack because if I fell, I'd likely end up on my back or side, crush all my equipment, and likely hurt me in the process.

So, I split up my kit: camera on me via the Carrier; and accessories in a messenger bag. For you reference, I carried a Nikon D3s with a 70-200 f2.8 - a pretty large and bulky setup. It was a bit awkward, but it worked fairly well overall. The Cotton Carrier is a bit geeky, but for these circumstances, it worked well: my hands were free, and it was centered nicely on my body.

Good luck!
Ozonation is offline  
Old 04-09-14, 06:00 AM
  #10  
NOS88
Senior Member
 
NOS88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Montgomery County, Pennsylvania
Posts: 6,489
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Ozonation View Post
Consider the "Cotton Carrier". Here's a cheesy promotional video: Cotton Carrier Camera Systems Action Video - YouTube

I have it, and yes, I have used it while biking. I was going to photograph a bike race and I thought it would be rather stupid to drive there - plus parking would be nonexistent. To be honest, I find the Cotton Carrier less than ideal if you're using the camera under "normal" circumstances; like you, I have Black Rapid straps. However, I was concerned about bumps and rattles while on the bike if I put my cameras into my basket or in panniers or strapped to the back rack. I figured if it was strapped to me, my body would provide the best shock absorption. I wasn't too keen on putting all my gear in a backpack because if I fell, I'd likely end up on my back or side, crush all my equipment, and likely hurt me in the process.

So, I split up my kit: camera on me via the Carrier; and accessories in a messenger bag. For you reference, I carried a Nikon D3s with a 70-200 f2.8 - a pretty large and bulky setup. It was a bit awkward, but it worked fairly well overall. The Cotton Carrier is a bit geeky, but for these circumstances, it worked well: my hands were free, and it was centered nicely on my body.

Good luck!

It's an interesting system. Being a member of Club Tombay, I'd worry about landing on top of my camera.
__________________
A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. - S. Wright
Favorite rides in the stable: Indy Fab CJ Ti - Colnago MXL - S-Works Roubaix - Habanero Team Issue - Jamis Eclipse carbon/831
NOS88 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.