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Looking for a new commuting bike

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Looking for a new commuting bike

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Old 04-16-14, 04:25 PM
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anaddict
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Looking for a new commuting bike

Hi,

I am pretty new at this. I'm looking to spend around 200-350 for a new bike to commuting to work with. So far what looks appealing to me is the Retrospec Mantra Fixie or the Vilano Rampage, but im not really sure what is considered good. any help?
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Old 04-16-14, 04:56 PM
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TransitBiker
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Vilano Rampage looks to be the better of the two, especially with that reversible rear hub... Might want to invest in fenders if they are not included. Have you learned about fixed & single speed bikes? Depending on the topography of the routes you plan on riding, you may want to get even just 3 speed rear hub so you get a high, medium and low gear for flats & hills.

I personally am not a fan of fixed gear, as i find the design is better suited to track and competition applications vs transportation. There are drawbacks, like if the pedal hits something, it directly affects the rotation of the rear wheel. Things to consider.

Whatever you end up buying, make sure it really fits you & your needs. Nothing more frustrating than a bike that can't do what you need it to.

Good luck on your hunt!!

- Andy
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Old 04-16-14, 05:36 PM
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I ride an aluminum road bike with steel fork, fenders and a rack. Yeah its heavier than a bike with carbon fork, and definitely heavier than a pure carbon race bike. But even with panniers and a trunk I can easily cruise at 14-17 in jeans after busting my butt at a very physical day job. Reaching 20mph isn't that hard if I'm trying either.

Now take off the trunk bag, panniers and wear my kit and a morning ride on my day off and I can blow the wheels off someone with a "faster" bike.

The bike won't make you go faster, that's your job.
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Old 04-16-14, 05:37 PM
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Originally Posted by anaddict View Post
Hi,

I am pretty new at this. I'm looking to spend around 200-350 for a new bike to commuting to work with. So far what looks appealing to me is the Retrospec Mantra Fixie or the Vilano Rampage, but im not really sure what is considered good. any help?
I've been commuting on fixed gears for few years and there is a learning curve. If you are new to riding fixed then it's better to start of slow and easy until you become comfortable controlling and handling the bike. Riding fixed in traffic takes skill. If you never commuted on a fixie in traffic then start with a freewheel until you get the feel for the bike and become good at riding, then change over to fixed. The more you ride the better you will become. Riding fixed is a lot of fun.
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Old 04-16-14, 06:28 PM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
I've been commuting on fixed gears for few years and there is a learning curve. If you are new to riding fixed then it's better to start of slow and easy until you become comfortable controlling and handling the bike. Riding fixed in traffic takes skill. If you never commuted on a fixie in traffic then start with a freewheel until you get the feel for the bike and become good at riding, then change over to fixed. The more you ride the better you will become. Riding fixed is a lot of fun.
I am used to fixed but on a smaller scale, like bmx bikes.

Originally Posted by TransitBiker View Post
Vilano Rampage looks to be the better of the two, especially with that reversible rear hub... Might want to invest in fenders if they are not included. Have you learned about fixed & single speed bikes? Depending on the topography of the routes you plan on riding, you may want to get even just 3 speed rear hub so you get a high, medium and low gear for flats & hills.
The route is mostly city, flat. I was plannong on going with fix because i hear they give somewhat of more control which is better for the city.
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Old 04-16-14, 10:06 PM
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Yea, if you're going to pick from those two, get the one with the reversible hub, that way you can ease into it. It is not like riding with free wheel, you really gotta focus on what your legs are doing plus think a few steps ahead so you have enough time to slow if need be. You may end up loving it or loathing it, so you may want to go to a shop and test a few models out, as they all have different feels to them, and ultimately the feel is what you're after. You won't be good with a bike that you don't feel in sync with, and you may end up taking a spill. Ask the bike shop folks about all the features and options you might want for your specific uses.. the more info you give about your needs the better recommendation they can make.

I do like the idea of a rack for anything transport, that way you can put anything on there, and leave your body free to do what it needs to corner etc a lil easier.

One last thing, is that you should always keep your mind open to different things. As much as i love hub shifters, i'm not going to go after a bike if the gearing ratios aren't what i am into or the fit and feel is wrong, and with a hub it is what it is, no changing it. Same with fixed speed, you might want to look into a shaft or belt drive if you don't want to worry about a chain, or maybe you do end up getting something with a cassette or IGH vs fixed. You may want to get a smaller or larger chain ring, which would alter your pedaling speed or cadence, that way it fits you perfectly. A guy i know who has a fixed speed has three chain rings that he alternates between. It's all about what fits you best!

- Andy
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