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East coast winter gloves?

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East coast winter gloves?

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Old 10-22-14, 08:25 PM
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randomguyy
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East coast winter gloves?

Looking for recommendations on winter gloves for an NYC winter of commuting. Would prefer to have something fairly thin (not looking for lobster gloves) with longer wrist coverage. Was considering something similar (if not) these: Castelli | An Unfair Advantage - Product details

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Old 10-22-14, 10:33 PM
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Here is what I do, they're not thin but the work really well! I have a pair of grippy heavy winter/snow gloves and I put my thin running gloves with smartscreen touch pads inside the heavy gloves. This allows me to use my phone , take on and take off my locks without having to expose my skin to the air. It's the best and cheapest solution I've yet to find.
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Old 10-23-14, 06:50 AM
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Originally Posted by walrus1 View Post
Here is what I do, they're not thin but the work really well! I have a pair of grippy heavy winter/snow gloves and I put my thin running gloves with smartscreen touch pads inside the heavy gloves. This allows me to use my phone , take on and take off my locks without having to expose my skin to the air. It's the best and cheapest solution I've yet to find.
Clever. I do the opposite. I put on heavy gloves with light cotton gloves over them so I can wipe my nose without irritating it (just irritating to those that witness it).
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Old 10-23-14, 07:29 AM
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those are a nice looking pair of gloves. I tend use two pairs of gloves. I have aero tech wind proof gloves and then i put some soft shell or wool liners inside the gloves. I like the options of multipair versus one pair. It helps to regulate temperature too.
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Old 10-23-14, 07:58 AM
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Layers, just like the rest of your body.
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Old 10-23-14, 08:38 AM
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Originally Posted by alan s View Post
Layers, just like the rest of your body.
Except not tight. The biggest mistake I've made with gloves is jamming in layers that were too tight, restricting blood flow, which made my hands even colder.
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Old 10-23-14, 08:59 AM
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^^^ Exactly this. ^^^

For my inner pair, I wear summer-weight full-finger MTB gloves in size large. Then I wear and extra-large pair of "cold weather" (read: Who cycles below freezing?) windproof, gloves for the outers. This combo gets me down to the mid-teens F. I can still work the STI levers just fine, and if I do need more dexterity, I still have the inner glove on.
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Old 10-23-14, 09:04 AM
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I use these Rivendell half-mitts over regular fingerless cycling gloves. They're easy to take off when I need dexterity.
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Old 10-23-14, 09:04 AM
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Happy with the Planet Bike Borealis, they have a liner that you can swap in and out with your own gloves to tune the temp.
Borealis

For really cold, and with a flat bar. I use a set of pogies:
IMG_2391 by mbeganyi, on Flickr

by mbeganyi, on Flickr

These are cheap ATV ones from the hunting section... but they work. I usually just wear a thin liner glove.
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Old 10-23-14, 11:33 AM
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Fleece, windproof gloves, I like the EMS versions but any outdoor/sports store should have them.
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Old 10-23-14, 11:48 AM
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Ski gloves are sold for pretty cheap Prices.. NB: Mittens are warmer than gloves..
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Old 10-23-14, 01:43 PM
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I wear cheap ski gloves with Glo-Gloves stretched over top. Keeps my hands warm down to around 15F for my 30 minute commute. If it's over 30F, I'll wear some fleece mittens instead. The mitten part can flip back to reveal fingerless gloves.
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Old 10-24-14, 01:29 AM
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These might help?

Auclair 4-Way Stretch Fleece Gloves - Recycled Polyester (For Men) - Save 66%

I have some thin recycled polyester gloves i got at macy's back in 2009. They need mending, but are absolutely amazing & can fit into both my thicker gloves and my snow gloves.

- Andy
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Old 10-24-14, 04:38 AM
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I went to the old school leather store on bleecker st. just east of sixth ave. and bought some deerskin gloves. They have them lined or unlined. I actually have both styles. I think they're light warm and flexible, kind of ideal. I also have merino liners that work with either pair.
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Old 10-25-14, 06:59 AM
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Originally Posted by rickbern View Post
I went to the old school leather store on bleecker st. just east of sixth ave. and bought some deerskin gloves. They have them lined or unlined. I actually have both styles. I think they're light warm and flexible, kind of ideal. I also have merino liners that work with either pair.
Wow, what a great tip for me. I live two blocks from Bleecker St! I had lined deerskin gloves years ago and have been looking for replacements since then.
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Old 10-25-14, 05:26 PM
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Two layers is the only thing that keeps my hands warm during the coldest days. I use a pair of thin lightweight gloves made from wool or fleece with heavier mitts over it. In my experience mitts is the only thing that works on longer rides during very cold weather.
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Old 10-26-14, 09:35 AM
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Originally Posted by bmike View Post
Happy with the Planet Bike Borealis, they have a liner that you can swap in and out with your own gloves to tune the temp.
Borealis

For really cold, and with a flat bar. I use a set of pogies:
IMG_2391 by mbeganyi, on Flickr

by mbeganyi, on Flickr

These are cheap ATV ones from the hunting section... but they work. I usually just wear a thin liner glove.
^^this.

I have them for my road bike. Completely wipes out the whole glove controversy. I use the same thin gloves I use at 40-50F inside of the Bar Mitts and my hands stay nice and warm, dexterity is terrific, and the fooling around with gloves is over. It's really tough to get a pair of gloves that are going to work right when they on on your hands, out there in a 20mph steady wind at cold temps. I don't think there is a glove on the planet that will hold up to that for long periods of time (I have some experience in this - I'm used to working at outside at extreme low temps down as far as -30F).

I get the ones designed for older shimano (i.e. brake cables not routed under the tape) even though I have the new style. The reason is that they have a zipper to let you get the brake cables through. Even though I don't need that, the zipper allows me to open them up a bit when it's warmer and let some cooling air in. Yep, that's right - they can be too warm.

I will use these when the temp is sustained at 30-40F or so and then lower. Then I wear a very light fleece glove by Pearl Izumi that breathes well but has some windproofness.

J.
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Old 10-26-14, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Wow, what a great tip for me. I live two blocks from Bleecker St! I had lined deerskin gloves years ago and have been looking for replacements since then.
Small world,
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Old 11-04-14, 08:37 AM
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gloves, can't have enough, just bought a pair this weekend, it's my addiction. for winter commuting though my favorite combo was separate glove liners (high quality) and roomy winter gloves. when it was 17 degrees I added a chemical warmer pack. I wasn't riding urban though so I was able to occasionally curl up some fingers and blow into the outer gloves to rewarm them switching off from one hand to the other when necessary
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Old 11-04-14, 03:52 PM
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Being a fashionable city guy I need elegant riding apparel, comfort and function is secondary.

These work gloves are nicely insulated, and I find having the reflective back improves visibility from ahead of the bike when hands are on the flat bars, and for signaling lane changes.
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Old 11-04-14, 06:31 PM
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I don't commute, but my hands get cold easily. I've tried lots of gloves, including some goretex windproof ski gloves. The ski gloves still left me with cold hands below 40F.

Now I have some different layers to combine.

1. REI glove liners. I just bought a second pair of these, in case REI stops selling them. These are really thin, and but somewhat wind resistant. They actually fit under my fingerless gloves, and that's a great combination at 55-60F. They have a smooth surface, so they are easy to fit inside other gloves.

2. "Windblocking" fleece gloves. I tried them alone in past years, but they weren't too warm. But I wore them last weekend with the thin liner gloves at 45F, and they worked great. My hands don't get damp from sweat. And I removed the liners when it got to 50F.

3. Marmot shell gloves. These are windproof and have a thin fleecy lining. They are sized quite a bit larger, to fit liner gloves. REI sold these in previous years, but I don't see them at REI online now.

I've worn these shells with thin liners and with fleece liners. The liners can get pretty wet from sweat, but dry pretty fast when removed from the shells. And if it warms up, the shells can be worn by themselves. It's nice that I can wash the liners and dry them quickly, and just air dry the shells, no washing needed.

The long cuffs keep cold air off my wrists and jacket cuffs. And the tether loops let me pull off the shells and let them hang if I need temporary finger dexterity with just the liners.

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Old 11-04-14, 07:03 PM
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Those are my DIY mitts. Tested at -36C, 5hrs. They are an improved version of the Choko mitts. I don't know what their temperature limits is. But i have no doubt they are good at -40F.
The wool liners are Ortovox wool liners (pretty much like dachstein)



My gloves are also DIY from Choko. They have been tested at 0F which is their limit. Comfort is better at 5F or 10F. Without those modifications they are good up to 30F.


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