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What to carry with tubeless wheels?

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Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational) This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like : "Unbound Gravel". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

What to carry with tubeless wheels?

Old 12-20-22, 09:15 AM
  #26  
Canker
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If you crank the valve nut on with pliers then yeah your going to need a pair to get it back off. Suppose to only put them on finger tight but I've been guilty of busting out pliers myself when one ticks me off and won't quit leaking. I carry a leatherman with me on my mountain bikes but I don't bother on my road bike. My new valves that are on my roadie have a larger nut with a big flat spots on the sides that makes doing and undoing them by hand much easier so hopefully not an issue.

oh and a trick that helps. When you get the tire off the rim push down on the rubber part of the valve stem in the rim to take pressure off the nut while turning it. If you are having trouble getting the nut by hand that can make all the difference.

Last edited by Canker; 12-20-22 at 09:18 AM.
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Old 12-20-22, 12:07 PM
  #27  
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Minimum:
Plug kit, pump.

Medium:
Add CO2, tire boot, spare tube, tire levers.

Maximum:
Add spare valve core, valve removal tool, extra sealant.

All of this assumes you carry tools needed for thru-axles, if you have them
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Old 12-20-22, 12:29 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Canker View Post
oh and a trick that helps. When you get the tire off the rim push down on the rubber part of the valve stem in the rim to take pressure off the nut while turning it. If you are having trouble getting the nut by hand that can make all the difference.
Cleverest thing I've read on bf in a while.
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Old 12-20-22, 12:34 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Canker View Post
If you crank the valve nut on with pliers then yeah your going to need a pair to get it back off. Suppose to only put them on finger tight but I've been guilty of busting out pliers myself when one ticks me off and won't quit leaking. I carry a leatherman with me on my mountain bikes but I don't bother on my road bike. My new valves that are on my roadie have a larger nut with a big flat spots on the sides that makes doing and undoing them by hand much easier so hopefully not an issue.

oh and a trick that helps. When you get the tire off the rim push down on the rubber part of the valve stem in the rim to take pressure off the nut while turning it. If you are having trouble getting the nut by hand that can make all the difference.
A stuck valve nut on my road bike resulted in a call to Uber to get home. I check my nuts a lot more often now.
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Old 12-20-22, 12:50 PM
  #30  
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I literally just redid my 27.5er hardtail a couple hours ago. Had to redo my rim tape so the valves had to come out. Resorted to pliers on the front valve when reinstalling. A little leak is fine since you can bounce it around and get the sealant to fix it but it was leaking like crazy till I got the pliers out. I used a new valve I had bought for my road bike on the rear and I think I'll be replacing all my valves with that style. It has a better designed nut that you can get tight by hand and works with tire inserts which I plan to run on the rear.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...TF8&th=1&psc=1
one I used but probably 500 other people have the exact same valves for sale on aliepress for $5 give take.
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Old 12-20-22, 02:52 PM
  #31  
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In the early days of tubeless I had the front blow off while commuting to work. Doesn't take a lot of pressure.
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Old 12-20-22, 05:07 PM
  #32  
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I've had 1 tubeless flat in 3 years of riding.
I sliced the sidewall of a tire on a broken beer bottle that was hidden in grass - I was warming up for a CX race and was able to fix the tire by booting it with a dollar bill and inserting a tube.

I carry a spare tube, 2 levers, dynaplug racer, 2 CO2's/head, and a multi-tool. I think I might have a spare valve core in my bag too, and that same dollar bill. This all fits into a tiny saddle bag.
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Old 12-20-22, 05:16 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by msu2001la View Post
...a spare tube, 2 levers, dynaplug racer, 2 CO2's/head, and a multi-tool.
That's my "standard" gravel/MTB kit, too. For longer days or rides further away from civilization, I'll add a mini pump and a second tube.
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Old 12-20-22, 09:43 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by msu2001la View Post
I've had 1 tubeless flat in 3 years of riding.
I sliced the sidewall of a tire on a broken beer bottle that was hidden in grass - I was warming up for a CX race and was able to fix the tire by booting it with a dollar bill and inserting a tube.

I carry a spare tube, 2 levers, dynaplug racer, 2 CO2's/head, and a multi-tool. I think I might have a spare valve core in my bag too, and that same dollar bill. This all fits into a tiny saddle bag.
I'm thinking about ditching the bacon strips and buying the Racer Pro. Have you used the Dynaplugs much -- and if so, are you happy with them?
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Old 12-20-22, 10:35 PM
  #35  
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Any problems with sealant working on cold days or rainy and cold days?
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Old 12-21-22, 01:29 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
I'm thinking about ditching the bacon strips and buying the Racer Pro. Have you used the Dynaplugs much -- and if so, are you happy with them?
I'm a convert. So far they've proven more reliable at working the first time than bacon, and the insertion tool is a big improvement, IMO.
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Old 12-21-22, 01:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Rolla View Post
I'm a convert. So far they've proven more reliable at working the first time than bacon, and the insertion tool is a big improvement, IMO.
Seems like it's a lot quicker, too. Last thing I want to do in a gravel race is fiddle around with threading a bacon strip through a tiny fork.
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Old 12-21-22, 02:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
Seems like it's a lot quicker, too. Last thing I want to do in a gravel race is fiddle around with threading a bacon strip through a tiny fork.
No doubt -- it's very efficient. Plunge the tip, top off the air, and go chase the pack.
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Old 12-22-22, 09:00 AM
  #39  
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Every bike I have is tubeless.

Every ride:
1. Dynaplug Racer, in jersey pocket. Stan's Darts and generic bacon strips both are inferior to Dynaplugs. Dynaplugs are expensive but worth it.
2. 16g generic threaded CO2 cartridge. I've found that every sealant works fine with CO2, despite what I've read. I still let the C02 out of the tire and reinflate when I get home.
3. Inflator with a controllable flow mechanism. There are lots of these, the $26 Pro Bike Tool with the little lever that is on Amazon is good, I also like the PDW Shiny Object.
4. Spare tube, which I have never had to use. Dynaplugs have sealed all of the (very rare) tubeless punctures the sealant can't deal with that I've had. I still bring a tube.
5. One lever.

For very long rides in rural areas, I add:
6. A minipump in the frame bag. I like designs with a little rubber hose. The Silca one is really good.
7. Motorcycle tire patch kit + vulcanizing fluid. This saved my ass once, they work really well and they're easy to use.
8. Another tube.
9. A couple more CO2 cartridges.
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Old 12-22-22, 09:11 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
I'm thinking about ditching the bacon strips and buying the Racer Pro. Have you used the Dynaplugs much -- and if so, are you happy with them?
Others covered it, but they're super easy to use. I haven't needed them while out on a ride yet, and just practiced using them on an old tire in my garage, but it was simple.
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Old 12-22-22, 09:22 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by fooferdoggie View Post
Any problems with sealant working on cold days or rainy and cold days?
I'm sure this varies depending on type/brand.
I use Orange Seal (regular) and have never noticed any problems with cold weather - but I store my bikes indoors and don't really ride in temps below 20F.

Orange Seal makes a "subzero" product that has a lower temp range. I know people who do winter fat-biking and use it. I see on their website that they state the following:
What is the temperature range of Orange Seal sealants?Regular: 12 F, Endurance: 8 F, Sub Zero: 20 F
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Old 12-22-22, 09:35 AM
  #42  
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I don't mean cold in that way does the seal work as well? but rain is the big one I have gotten flats when its wet more often then any other time. wet and cold of course.
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Old 12-22-22, 09:53 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by fooferdoggie View Post
I don't mean cold in that way does the seal work as well? but rain is the big one I have gotten flats when its wet more often then any other time. wet and cold of course.
When roads are wet, debris is more likely to stick to your tires and work its way through the casing.
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Old 12-22-22, 12:29 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
When roads are wet, debris is more likely to stick to your tires and work its way through the casing.
yes what I am asking is will the sealant work ok in wet weather?
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Old 12-22-22, 01:59 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by fooferdoggie View Post
yes what I am asking is will the sealant work ok in wet weather?
I don't know why it would be any different than dry weather in that regard. It's plugging the tire from the inside, so moisture shouldn't be much of an issue.
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Old 12-22-22, 02:28 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
I'm thinking about ditching the bacon strips and buying the Racer Pro. Have you used the Dynaplugs much -- and if so, are you happy with them?
Originally Posted by Rolla View Post
I'm a convert. So far they've proven more reliable at working the first time than bacon, and the insertion tool is a big improvement, IMO.
Originally Posted by msu2001la View Post
Others covered it, but they're super easy to use. I haven't needed them while out on a ride yet, and just practiced using them on an old tire in my garage, but it was simple.
Just ordered the Dynaplug Racer Pro. Like all such items, I'm hoping to never need it. But I'm pretty sure I will.
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Old 12-22-22, 03:44 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by fooferdoggie View Post
yes what I am asking is will the sealant work ok in wet weather?
People ride tubeless tires for wet and muddy CX racing and winter fat biking all the time.
Wet weather or roads/terrain doesn't affect sealant.
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Old 12-22-22, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by msu2001la View Post
People ride tubeless tires for wet and muddy CX racing and winter fat biking all the time.
Wet weather or roads/terrain doesn't affect sealant.
ok thats what I was after. I had sealants in tubed tires and it seldom worked but most of the time that was when it was raining.
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Old 12-31-22, 09:54 AM
  #49  
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It really depends on the gravel where you ride. If you are riding on crushed limestone, your tires won't last nearly as long and you are more likely to experience a failure like cut sidewall or large hole in tread that will require a boot and/or tube at some point. If you are riding on mined gravel/river gravel like we have where I live (the plains states) you really don't need to carry much. I always have a pump and I only carry a tube on race day and even then I've not used one. Same goes with type of tire you ride. Obviously, tire choice should match what you are riding and will reduce your likelyhood of roadside repair dramatically.

I keep an eye on my sealant level (remove valvecore and use a dipstick to make sure there is some) and I don't have to do roadside repairs. Maybe once in the last 5 years and that was in Missouri, deep crushed limestone with potholes. Where I live I have never done one. I've had to stop and pump up the tire a few times due to an outrageous amount of goathead stickers but never taken a tire off the rim.

Last edited by pipeliner; 12-31-22 at 09:59 AM.
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Old 01-07-23, 08:46 AM
  #50  
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Is it worth carrying a small bottle of extra sealant? And how about a small pocket knife to trim off the back strip after you plug the hole? Is it worth carrying a mini pump Or better to just have extra co2 instead?
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